• KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 61 - 66 of 84

Tajikistan Seeks EU Cooperation on Energy Projects

Tajikistan believes that the European Union (EU) will encourage energy projects that are being implemented in the country and throughout Central Asia to mitigate climate change. That's the view held by Sirojiddin Mukhriddin, the head of Tajikistan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, expressed during a speech at the diplomatic forum “New Dynamics of Cooperation in Eurasia” in Antalya, Turkey. “Just five percent of the nation’s current hydropower potential has been utilized up to this point. Our projects are wonderful. Among them is the Rogun HPP, one of the world's biggest hydroelectric power stations. Of course, we also invited all of our partners to help us build these initiatives, [and] the European Union is one of them,” said Mukhriddin. The minister mentioned that the United States and the EU are funding the construction of a hydroelectric power plant in the republic's mountainous Badakhshan autonomous region. Mukhriddin claimed that this would contribute to the energy supply for both this area and Afghanistan, a neighboring country with its own pressing electricity needs. Mukhriddin mentioned the Sustainable Energy Connections in Central Asia project, which is being managed by the EU. “We believe that the program will fortify the institutional, legal, and regulatory framework for the region’s shift to a sustainable energy system,” the minister said. “With the help of our partners, especially the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and others, we anticipate that this project will be implemented successfully,” he added.

World Bank Supports Development of Tajikistan’s Emerging E-Commerce Market

On March 1st, Dushanbe played host to ‘Elevating Global Access through E-Commerce (E-GATE)’, a conference organized by the World Bank and the IFC. A first for Tajikistan, its goal was to facilitate knowledge and resource exchange amongst the country’s small and medium enterprises as well as with regional and global players in the e-commerce ecosystem. “Recognizing the pivotal role e-commerce plays in modern economies, the World Bank is actively supporting Tajikistan in its journey to develop appropriate platforms, including E-GATE,” said Ozan Sevimli, World Bank Country Manager for Tajikistan. “The E-GATE program offers Tajik small and medium enterprises highly valuable membership of global B2B e-commerce platforms to access markets unavailable offline, and provide technical support to the government on drafting enabling legislation, and channel global knowledge to Tajik e-sellers through capacity building activities.” The conference attracted e-commerce stakeholders from Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, as well as global e-commerce giants including Amazon and Alibaba. In landlocked Tajikistan, as in the whole of Central Asia, the emergence of e-commerce is proving a powerful tool to tap into global markets for locally made products, modernize traditional supply chains, and foster growth in employment opportunities. To ensure the smooth functioning of E-commerce operations, Tajikistan recently introduced a ‘On Electronic Commerce’ law. According to ECDB, a specialized e-commerce data analytics company (https://ecommercedb.com/markets/tj/all), Tajikistan is currently one of the smaller markets for e-commerce. The predicted revenue for 2024 is $17.1 million but once developed, is expected to increase by 5.4% per annum resulting in a projected market volume of $21.1 million by 2028.

EBRD Helps Increase Reliability of Tajikistan’s Electrical Grid

An announcement was made on February 28th that the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) is to increase the reliability and sustainability of electricity supply in Tajikistan. The national transmission network operator Shabaqahoi Intiqoli Barq (SIB) will be awarded some €31 million, comprising two EBRD sovereign loans and an investment grant of up to €8 million to help restore the existing transformer and construct a new one at the Sugd-500 substation in the north of the country. The northern Tajikistan power system depends on the 500 kV Sugd-Dushanbe high-voltage line connected to the Sugd-500 substation. Once upgraded and expanded, the substation will allow for a more sustainable electrical grid able to meet domestic and export demands. It will also help SIB integrate up to 700 MW of renewables in line with Tajikistan’s 2030 National Development Strategy to diversify its energy production. In 2023, Tajikistan’s energy capacity exceeded 6,000 megawatts, and electricity production amounted to 22 billion kilowatt-hours; 4.8 billion kilowatt-hours or 28% more than in 2017. Addressing the issue last December, Tajik President Emomali Rahmon announced that the government was making sound progress in its strategy to establish a ‘green economy’. To achieve this goal, he explained that over the next seven years, Tajikistan aims to increase electricity exports to 10 billion kilowatt-hours, and by 2030, the construction of power plants employing renewable energy sources will increase the production of green energy to 1,000 megawatts. Looking ahead, the country aims to source all its electricity from renewable sources, primarily hydropower, by 2023.

Two Hydrometric Stations Open On Uzbekistan, Tajikistan Border

Two hydrometric stations have been opened along the cross-border Great Fergana Canal and North Fergana Canal, according to a report by news portal Gazeta.uz. Construction of the stations was facilitated by the Swiss government’s Blue Peace Central Asia initiative. The project was started in 2017 in response to the need for a cross-border strategy for water management in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. The hydrometric stations were opened as part of the sixth meeting of the Uzbekistan-Tajikistan working group on the coordinated use of the transnational rivers’ water resources in Central Asia. The two countries signed a protocol on the automated computations and real-time transfer of cost data to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan from the two stations. The Gazeta.uz report claims that Switzerland has been assisting water reform initiatives in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan for nearly 20 years, employing an integrated approach to national water resources management. Blue Peace Central Asia supports the creation of guidelines for regional cooperation aimed at ensuring water security for the entire population of Central Asia. Recently, the data source Meteojurnal released statistics regarding the use of Amudarya water by Central Asian nations in 2023, based on information from the scientific information center of the Central Asian interstate water management coordination commission (Afghanistan was not taken into account). The largest user of river water was Turkmenistan, which diverted 42% of river water (20 cubic kilometers) to its own country. In second place was Uzbekistan, which used 38.4% of the river’s water (about 18.3 cubic kilometers). The next largest user, Tajikistan, accounted for 19.8% of water (more than 9.4 cubic kilometers).

Peace Following Kyrgyz-Tajik Clashes Allows Hydro Engineers to Visit Tajikistan

For the first time since the start of armed clashes on the Kyrgyz-Tajik border, business cooperation between the two countries has begun to return. Kyrgyz Energy Minister Taalaibek Ibrayev and his delegation recently visited a pair of Tajikistan's energy facilities, the Rogun and Nurek hydroelectric power plants (HPP), according to the press service of the Kyrgyz Ministry of Energy. Tajikistan's Deputy Minister for Energy Halmukhamadzoda Sobron showed Kyrgyz colleagues how the Rogun HPP is being built, as well as some special underground facilities and tunnels under the plant. Sobron described problems faced by Tajik hydro construction workers when using construction equipment at the site, and detailed the integrated stage-by-stage approach to building the main structures of the hydropower plant. "More than 15,000 hydro construction workers are involved in the construction of the Rogun HPP, more than 300,000 machines and equipment are operated, and skillful planning allows dozens of contracting companies to work simultaneously," Tajik power engineers emphasized. The Kyrgyz side noted that the exchange of experience in the construction of such grandiose facilities will be useful in the construction of Kambar-Ata HPP-1 in Kyrgyzstan. During the three-day visit, Kyrgyz power engineers also visited plants responsible for the production of hydromechanical equipment and for  the production of electrical equipment. During the meetings it was emphasized that after the border issue is resolved, the sides are ready to cooperate with each other again on all issues. Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are usually connected by high-voltage power lines, which play an important role in the regular supply of electricity to local residents living in the border areas. However, these lines are now out of operation. The problem with the border between the two countries arose after the collapse of the USSR. Essentially both parties claimed land that's rich in water resources, as the issue of agricultural irrigation is very relevant in the arid region. More than 30 years have passed since then, and the parties still cannot agree on the disputed territories. Because of this, conflicts periodically arise between citizens of border villages -- as well as residents of enclaves and border guards of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan -- including with the use of heavy weaponry. The last such conflict took place in the Batken region of Kyrgyzstan and Sughd region of Tajikistan in September 2022 -- at which time there were hundreds of deaths on both sides and civilian infrastructure was destroyed. Since May 2021, transportation by land or air between the countries remains closed. Trade and all business contacts have been suspended. To date, the two countries have agreed to demarcate about 90% of the disputed territories. Rogun HPP is a hydroelectric power plant under construction on the Vakhsh River. It is the largest HPP in Central Asia. Construction of Rogun HPP began in the 1970s, but in the 1990s work was stopped due to the collapse of the Soviet Union and the outbreak of civil war in Tajikistan. Construction resumed only in 2010 with the support of the World Bank. The first...

IFC Invests in Tajikistan’s First Green Bond

The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, has announced a subscription of up to $10m in a landmark local currency green bond issued by Tajikistan's Eskhata Bank. This green bond is the first for the country, and is aimed at boosting access to climate finance for smaller businesses amid a challenging macro-economic environment. Eskhata Bank is one of the country's leading private banks, with a focus on serving micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) and retail clients. The proceeds of the green bond will enable Eskhata to support MSMEs in undertaking climate-smart initiatives, supporting economic activity at a challenging time for the country. "IFC's investment in Eskhata Bank's green bond is a testament to our dedication to supporting MSMEs in driving environmental sustainability," said Akmaljon Saifidinov, Eskhata Bank's CEO. "By channeling funds towards climate-smart projects, we are helping to build a more resilient and sustainable economy in Tajikistan.”  Tajikistan recently approved its Green Economy Development Strategy for 2023–2037, which sets a clear vision for its transition to a low-carbon and resilient economy. IFC is supporting this process through its climate finance program in Central Asia, which aims to increase the flow of green finance into the country.  "This first green bond issuance in Tajikistan by our long-standing client, Bank Eskhata, is a remarkable achievement that demonstrates the bank's commitment to sustainable development," said Zafar Khashimov, IFC Regional Manager. Green bonds raise funds for projects with positive environmental benefits, such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, waste management, or green building.