• KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 57

Kyrgyzstan and U.S. Review Political, Security and Economic Cooperation

On April 22 Bishkek hosted Annual Bilateral Consultations led by the Deputy Foreign Minister of the Kyrgyz Republic Aibek Moldogaziev and U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs John Mark Pommersheim. Referencing the historic C5+1 Summit held on September 22, 2023 in New York, the parties commended its positive impact on regional cooperation and the U.S.-Kyrgyzstan commitment to enhancing U.S.-Central Asia regional partnership. Deputy Foreign Minister Moldogaziev and Deputy Assistant Secretary Pommersheim reaffirmed the importance of annual bilateral consultations in advancing shared priorities, including political and security cooperation, economic partnership and support for civil society and rule of law. Under security cooperation, discussions focused on counterterrorism, border protection, global health security, and continued defense cooperation, with the United States reiterating its unwavering support for Kyrgyzstan’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, and independence. Both sides emphasized their commitment to grow and diversify the Kyrgyz economy, increase U.S. private sector investment, improve regional connectivity and trade, expand agricultural cooperation, and advance partnership on critical minerals and the green economy. Collaboration on the continued commitment to addressing social issues included furthering economic opportunities for persons with disabilities, and measures to protect public health. Looking towards the realization of creating a resilient, prosperous, and secure Kyrgyzstan, delegates listed media freedom, a strong civil society, respect for human rights -including women’s rights- stronger protection against gender-based violence, judicial independence, and combating corruption, as essential. The parties also discussed the importance of continuing to increase cooperation through educational and English language programmes, emphasizing the important role of direct personal interaction in the countries’ bilateral relationship.

Central Asia Can Help Bring Afghanistan into the International Fold

Afghanistan's situation remains deeply troubling, reflecting a complex history of conflict and political instability that has severely impacted its social and economic fabric. The Soviet Union's invasion 45 years ago, followed by the Taliban's rise to power in 1996 and the U.S. involvement after the September 2001 terrorist attacks linked to Al-Qaeda, and finally the Taliban’s return to leadership in 2021, have all shaped the current crisis. Today, Afghanistan appears no closer to becoming a functioning state capable of contributing positively to the global community. As recent as 2020, nearly half of the country’s population lived below the poverty line. The plight of women and girls continues to be particularly dire as they have been denied secondary education since the Taliban regained power nearly three years ago. An invigorated engagement with the international community would no doubt provide multiple benefits to not only Afghanistan’s own people but also to the larger region. Whether the troubled country remains a zone of conflict or becomes a contributor to a sustainable future will depend on its ability and willingness to eventually integrate into broader regional and global frameworks. A state’s adherence to modern democratic values is often seen as one of the conditions for recognition as a genuine international partner by the global community. These norms are usually associated with Western-oriented ideologies and are therefore difficult for today’s Taliban-led Afghanistan to embrace and implement. There are possible ways to bridge this apparent divide. At a meeting held in Doha on 18-19 February 2024, UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres reported that he had begun consultations on the appointment of a UN Special Envoy to Afghanistan to “coordinate engagement between Kabul and the international community.” Pakistan, who shares a 2,640-km border with Afghanistan, proposed that the envoy should be a “Muslim, experienced diplomat and from the region”. Pakistan’s candidacy is tarnished, however, by accusations that it provided military support to the Taliban, which Pakistan’s government denies. Turkey, another possibility, is a NATO member that has sustained political and economic ties with Afghanistan. However, its geographical distance makes it less of a stakeholder in the economic and security environments impacted by Afghanistan and as such, it lacks some of the necessary incentives and leverage points needed to influence Afghanistan’s actions.   Central Asia’s unique insights and motivations to help Afghanistan In the same Doha gathering, Guterres also proposed establishing a contact group of states that might include the “P-5 [the United States, China, France, Russia, and the United Kingdom] with a group of regional countries and relevant donors” for a more coordinated approach to engaging Afghanistan’s “de facto authorities”. The Central Asian republics making up the “C-5” should certainly be considered among the “regional countries” grouping that Guterres mentioned. Firstly, Central Asia has been affected by economic and security developments in Afghanistan, including narcotics trafficking, as well as by the overflow radical extremism and a resurgence of the militant cause. The region plays critical role today in curtailing the spread of illiberal and violent ideologies and...

Turkmenistan Strengthens Cooperation with UNODC

A significant meeting convened at the United Nations headquarters in Vienna on November 8, 2023, witnessing the collaboration between Turkmenistan's Deputy Prosecutor General-led delegation and the leadership of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Central to the discussions was Turkmenistan's recent decision to become a part of the Global Operational Network of Anti-Corruption Law Enforcement Authorities, known as the GlobE system. Both parties acknowledged this step and expressed their mutual readiness to engage in robust collaboration within this network, indicating a shared commitment to combatting corruption. The meeting delved into the comprehensive efforts under the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its three additional Protocols, signifying the mutual dedication to addressing transnational criminal activities. Additionally, discussions encompassed the implementation and impact of the UN Convention against Corruption, reflecting the shared pursuit of curbing corruption on a global scale. Amidst the dialogue, the participants explored the future potential for collaboration between Turkmenistan and UNODC, highlighting the ongoing commitment to foster partnerships and initiatives aimed at promoting security, justice, and the rule of law.