• KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 4

Mixed Reaction to Uzbekistan’s New Fruit Export Policy

Uzbekistan's cabinet of ministers has introduced 'recommended' export prices for 60 types of fruits and vegetables, below which their distribution abroad is now prohibited. While this move is intended to support exporters, analysts from the agency EastFruit say that it will harm exports, risk long-term cooperation, and that the new measures will not increase tax revenues or improve currency control. A recent article by EastFruit states: “Notably, these prices are fixed for the produce irrespective of quality, variety, or other differentiating factors, which disregards the inherent diversity within the fruit and vegetable industry. Historical trends indicate that such regulatory decisions are detrimental across the board. They primarily affect producers and small-scale exporters by limiting their market opportunities. This restriction not only diminishes investment appeal in agricultural production but also detracts from Uzbekistan’s attractiveness as a trading partner for major, established importers. The introduction of such direct controls makes the prospect of long-term contractual partnerships exceedingly precarious”. Uzbek economist Otabek Bakirov described this decision as “another bureaucratic hurdle for exporters”. “These rules make doing business worse, so the new rules should come into force at least 3 months after they are announced. Or will the Government’s decision prevail over the Law once again?” wrote the economist on his Telegram channel. Analysts also note that Uzbekistan’s exports have stagnated due to Russia's ban on importing fruits and vegetables from most countries. Export figures have remained almost unchanged over the past five years, ranging from $700 million to $900 million. Russia (26.3%), Pakistan (24.2%), Kazakhstan (13%) and China (9.3%) are the main export markets for fruit and vegetable products.

Kazakhstan Motoring Towards to Fuel Self-Sufficiency

Speaking at a government meeting on May 28, Kazakhstan Energy Minister Almasadam Satkaliev announced a significant rise in the country’s supplies of fuel, raising the potential for its future export. During the first quarter of the year, oil refined in Kazakhstan amounted to 5.9 million tons; an increase of 5.4% compared to spring 2023. Production of fuel amounted to 4.28 million tons. To date, reserves of diesel fuel at refineries and oil depots have increased to 612 thousand tons, 38 days’ worth; AI-92 gasoline, to 352 thousand tons, 30 days’ worth, and AI-95 gasoline, to 86 thousand tons, 30 days’ worth. The depth of oil refining and consequently, the production of light oil products (gasoline) has increased from 85% to 87%. Kazakhstan plans to increase the production of motor fuel by expanding production at the Shymkent oil refinery from 6 to 12 million tons by 2030, at the Atyrau Oil Refinery from 5.5 to 6.7 million tons by 2027, and at the Pavlodar Petrochemical Plant from 5.5 to 8 million tons by 2030. According to the minister, the implementation of the above will not only satisfy the domestic market’s growing demands for fuel but also, allow its export to neighbouring countries.  

Kazakhstan Increases Furniture Exports

According to a report by the Kazakh Ministry of Industry and Construction, in 2023, Kazakhstan exported furniture valued at $13.7 million; an increase of 31% since the previous year. The prime market for Kazakh furniture is found in former Soviet countries and in 2023, to meet demand, domestic enterprises produced goods worth a total of 82.6 billion tenge; 28% more than in 2022. The most popular product was kitchen furniture, with an increase in volume of 50.4%, followed by wooden office furniture with an increase in volume of 5.4%. In comparison to 2022, the importation of furniture last year dropped by 5.3%; an indication of Kazakhs’ increasing preference for locally made products. In 2023, the industry generated a total of $537.4 million and invested of 17 billion tenge in production. With statistics showing a 3.9-fold increase compared to 2022, the future of Kazakhstan’s furniture manufacturers looks comfortable.

Uzbekistan To Increase Agricultural Exports

Agricultural production in Uzbekistan grew by 4.1% in 2023, and agricultural exports reached almost $2bn. This year the country plans to increase exports to $3.5bn.   At a government meeting on February 2nd officials reported that 6,000 gardens, over 3,000 vineyards and fields, and 344 packaging enterprises will be brought into compliance with international phytosanitary standards. Exports will be focused on markets with higher purchasing and paying powers. Modern facilities for exporting fruits and vegetables will be created at Fergana, Samarkand, and Tashkent airports. In recent years 620 phytosanitary permits have been received for the export of agricultural products to 80 countries. As part of the EU’s GSP+ trade preference system, 200,000 hectares of farmland in Uzbekistan have been brought into compliance with international standards.

Start typing to see posts you are looking for.