• KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 115 - 120 of 135

Uzbekistan to Improve Efficiency of Water Use in Agriculture

At a government meeting on January 4th, President of Uzbekistan, Shavkat Mirziyoyev listened to proposals aimed at improving the efficiency of water use in agriculture. At the meeting it was stated that in the current condition of an increasingly worsening shortage of water resources, special attention needs to be paid to its rational use. In recent years, 472,000 hectares has been converted to using drip irrigation, 48,000 to sprinkler irrigation, and water-saving technologies have been introduced on 97,000 hectares. As a result of these measures, two billion cubic meters of water were saved in 2023 alone, which is equal to the annual consumption of the Bukhara region. Starting this year, the payment for one cubic meter of water supplied to the field has been set at U$0.008, as the time has come to change the idea that has been established in the minds of many people that water is free, officials said at the meeting. In this regard, it was proposed to organize settlements with water consumers on a differentiated basis. In particular, from 2025 it is planned that a lower tax coefficient be applied to farmers who have installed water meters and introduced water-saving technologies, and a higher rate be applied to those who have failed to do so. The meeting also discussed measures to further stimulate the introduction of water-saving technologies, including opening a preferential credit line under which loans will be issued at a rate of 14% for a period of five years with a two-year grace period. Mirziyoyev approved this proposal, and gave instructions for the scope of water conservation work to be expanded.

Kazakhstan Now Chairs International Fund for Saving Aral Sea

From 2024, the chairmanship of the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea (IFAS) has passed to Kazakhstan, after President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev was elected as head of IFAS until the end of 2026, the Kazakh Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation said. The International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea, which includes Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, is engaged in the implementation of joint interstate environmental, scientific and practical programs and projects aimed at saving the Aral Sea and improving the environmental situation in the region, as well as solving common social and environmental problems.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="12017" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]“We are aiming to deepen cooperation both with the states of Central Asia and other international organizations and financial institutions,” said the Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation of Kazakhstan, Nurzhan Nurzhigitov. “This year we plan to begin the second phase of the project to preserve the Northern Aral Sea, implemented together with the World Bank. Saving the Aral Sea is a task that can only be accomplished through the joint efforts of all IFAS founding states. In the next three years, we intend to achieve significant results in this direction.” Speaking in September 2023 in Dushanbe at a meeting of the Council of Heads of State–Founders of the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea, Tokayev said that IFAS has become the most important institution facilitating regional cooperation on issues of transboundary water resources sharing, as well as solving environmental and socio-economic problems in the Aral Sea basin. Tokayev also emphasized the need to create a mechanism for long-term and sustainable cooperation for the effective use of water and energy resources in Central Asia, taking into account the interests of all countries in the region. To ensure transparency of water use in the region and strengthen the dialogue and friendship between Central Asian nations, Tokayev proposed the development of a work plan which would introduce a unified automated system of accounting, monitoring, management and distribution of water resources in the Aral Sea basin. Tokayev also called on Kyrgyzstan to resume its full participation in IFAS.

Air Pollution in Tashkent Reaches “Very Harmful” Level

The level of air pollution in Tashkent rose to “very harmful,” with an increase in the concentration of toxic substances in the atmosphere. According to the latest information from the international service IQAir, at 18:00 on January 3rd, Tashkent recorded an air quality index of 223, placing the capital second in the world in terms of cities with the highest levels of air pollution, between Delhi (273), and above Dhaka (220). According to data from this time, the concentration of particulate matter PM2.5 reached 173 μg/m3. Air quality in the city was rated as "very unhealthy." The highest level of pollution was recorded in the Yunusabad district of the capital. The situation is fluctuating wildly, however, and by 18:00 local time on the evening of January 4th, Tashkent had dropped to number 37 on the rankings, with an air quality index of 67.

Kazakhstan Seeks to Resolve Water Management Issues with Regional Neighbors

In the modern world, water is as valuable a resource as minerals. For that reason, on September 1st, 2023, the President of Kazakhstan, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev by decree created the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation. “Water resources are no less important for our country than oil, gas or metals. I believe that the effective development of the water management system should be handled by an independent department,” Tokayev said at the time. Despite the short period of its work, the new Ministry has already had concrete results, the official website of the Prime Minister of Kazakhstan (primeminister.kz) stated in reviewing the country’s economic performance in 2023.  In particular, the concept for the development of a water resources management system for 2024-2030 has been developed. It will allow for the area of irrigated agricultural land in Kazakhstan to increase up to 2.2 million hectares, increase the share of water-saving technologies up to 40%, and reduce the loss of irrigation water during transportation down to 15%. The Ministry has also prepared a plan for the development of the water sector of Kazakhstan for 2024-2030. Its implementation will increase the volume of the country's water resources by 3.7 cubic kilometers, reduce losses of irrigation water and increase its volume by three cubic kilometers, provide water to 41 settlements with a population of more than 55,000 people, and also reduce Kazakhstan's dependence on water supplies from neighboring countries by 25%. In 2024-2026, it is planned to begin construction of 20 new reservoirs and reconstruct 15 reservoirs across the country. A total of 339 canals with a length of 3,5000 km will be reconstructed. The Ministry also conducted negotiations with neighboring states on water security. As a result, it is expected that by April 1st, 2024, 11.1 cubic kilometers of water will flow into the Syr Darya River, and 487 million cubic meters of water are expected to be taken through the Dostyk interstate canal. This will allow for the accumulation of the volume of water required for growing season in Kazakhstan’s Turkestan and Kyzylorda regions, as well as sending 1.6 cubic kilometers of water to the Aral Sea.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13383" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no" title="Butakov Bay, Small Aral Sea. Photo: TCA"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]An agreement was reached with upstream Kyrgyzstan on the supply of irrigation water to the Zhambyl region in southern Kazakhstan, which experienced a severe water shortage this past summer. The Ministry is also negotiating with upstream China on more than 20 rivers that flow to Kazakhstan, including the Ertys, Ili, and Emel. Today, the two neighboring countries have reached a consensus on a number of issues regarding water distribution. Finally, a draft agreement is being developed on a mechanism for water and energy cooperation between the countries of Central Asia, with the participation of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

Snow Leopard Becomes National Symbol of Kyrgyzstan

On December 30th, Kyrgyz President Sadyr Japarov signed a Decree “On recognizing the snow leopard as a national symbol of the Kyrgyz Republic,” the presidential press service has reported. The snow leopard has the status of a rare or endangered species in 12 countries. This animal is an indicator of the stability and health of the mountain ecosystem, which occupies a third of the globe. The loss of snow leopards from the wild would risk upsetting the delicate ecological balance, which would have detrimental effects on various animal species and humans. “In the culture of the ancient Kyrgyz people, the snow leopard personified greatness, nobility, courage, courage and endurance. Therefore, according to legends, the leopard was the totem animal of the great Manas,” the presidential press service reported. The poem "Manas" is one of the greatest works of Kyrgyz folklore, and is included in the list of masterpieces of the oral and intangible cultural heritage of humanity by UNESCO, as well as in the Guinness Book of Records as the most voluminous epic in the world. Kyrgyzstan is an active participant in global wildlife conservation programs. At the first International Forum on Snow Leopard Conservation in Bishkek in 2013, with the support of representatives of 12 snow leopard range countries and the international community, the Bishkek Declaration on the Protection of the Snow Leopard was unanimously adopted and the Global Snow Leopard and Ecosystem Protection (GSLEP) Program was approved. In order to further state support for initiatives to preserve the snow leopard and its ecosystem in the Kyrgyz Republic, the presidential decree instructed the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic to take measures to protect the snow leopard population and as its ecosystem, and to take measures to popularize the new national symbol.

Investing in the Future: Upgrading Kazakhstan’s Heating and Power Infrastructure

As nations around the globe grapple with the urgency of climate change and the need for sustainable development, one country that stands out is Kazakhstan. With its vast natural resources and strategic location, Kazakhstan has the potential to become a leader in renewable energy and sustainable infrastructure. However, upgrading Kazakhstan's heating and power infrastructure is a significant undertaking that requires substantial time and financial investment. The Challenge Kazakhstan is no stranger to the harsh realities of tough winters. With temperatures often dropping below -30 degrees Celsius and even reaching lows of -52 degrees Celsius in some northern regions, the capacity and resilience of the country's heating infrastructure is tested annually. In a country where winter can last up to six months, maintaining a reliable heating supply isn't just a matter of comfort—it's a matter of survival. However, the extreme weather conditions put a considerable strain on Kazakhstan's heating infrastructure and lead to several challenges. Many of Kazakhstan's heating systems, built during the Soviet era, are showing their age and inefficiency, necessitating an expensive overhaul. These outdated systems often break down, leading to extended periods without heat in the coldest months. A striking example was the 2022 incident in Ekibastuz, a city known for its harsh winters, where residents endured nearly three months without heat due to a power plant failure, which subsequently sparked a government-led corruption investigation. Compounding these issues, Kazakhstan's heating sector heavily relies on fossil fuels, primarily coal. This reliance not only exacerbates environmental pollution but also leads to energy inefficiency. Due to poor insulation in buildings and obsolete heating systems, much of the produced heat is lost, demanding more energy and resources to maintain warmth in homes and businesses. The cost of heating is a significant expense for many Kazakh households, particularly those in rural areas where incomes are lower. The government provides subsidies to help offset these costs, but with energy prices rising globally, this is becoming an increasingly heavy burden on the national budget. The financial aspect of such upgrades is undoubtedly substantial. One source estimates that upgrading transmission and distribution infrastructure alone for all of Central Asia could cost between $25 billion to $49 billion. Additionally, infrastructure projects of this magnitude can take several years to over a decade to implement. For instance, Denmark began its transition to district heating systems and combined heat and power plants in the 1970s, and is still implementing improvements today. Similarly, Germany started its Energiewende (energy transition) initiative in 2000, with goals set for 2050. What Steps Have Been Taken? Efforts are made to upgrade aging systems, improve energy efficiency, and transition to more sustainable sources of energy. In 2023, Kazakhstan significantly upgraded its energy infrastructure, as reported by the Astana Times. The launch of the second Beineu-Zhanaozen gas pipeline and a new distribution pipeline in Mangystau Region improved gas supply, while the completion of the Makat-North Caucasus pipeline met regional demands. The western zone's energy network was fortified with five new power transmission lines. Renewable energy saw...

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