• KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00212 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09388 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 172

Central Asian Countries Gather to Share Air Pollution Solutions

On June 19th a political and regional forum was organized in Tashkent under the slogan “Building a Clean Air Future in Central Asia”. The forum was organized in partnership with the Uzbek Ministry of Ecology, the World Bank, and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP). Participants included senior officials from the governments of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The forum was created to allow the countries of Central Asia to exchange knowledge on how to prevent air pollution. Air quality in both urban and rural areas is affected by transboundary pollution, caused by emissions from burning fossil fuels in industry, the heating sector, and transport. Another source of pollution in cities is sand and dust storms. Most air quality-related illnesses and premature deaths in Central Asia are attributable to delicate particulate matter 2.5 microns or less in diameter (PM2.5). Their concentration in large cities is often several times higher than the permissible air quality parameters recommended by the World Health Organization. This is especially noticeable during winter, when the heating sector uses coal and gas for power. According to the IQAir portal, which monitors global air quality, Central Asian cities are often among the most polluted cities in the world. The participants at “Building a Clean Air Future in Central Asia” studied each other's measures and practices in air quality management. They then defined some priority directions for accelerating regional cooperation on these issues. Valerie Hickey, the World Bank's global director for environment, natural resources and the blue economy, commented: “Air quality management is a complex challenge that requires understanding where the pollution comes from and prioritizing actions in those sectors. This will take better data and stronger regulations harmonized across borders, credible institutions, and clean infrastructure. Working together, the countries can clean the air across Central Asia.” Sylvie Motar, deputy director of the European office of the UNEP, added: “Air pollution knows no borders, so cooperation between Central Asian countries in this area is essential. This dialogue will help increase investments in clean air to protect the health of the people of Central Asia.”

World Bank: Uzbekistan Must Tackle Gender Inequality

The World Bank Uzbekistan has published a new “Country Gender Assessment Report: Uzbekistan” on gender assessment in the country. This report (CGA) was produced with financial support from Great Britain. This report examines gender equality in Uzbekistan in various areas such as education, health, economic activity, protection from gender-based violence, marriage, divorce, and participation in public life. CGA examines social norms, assessing cultural attitudes and practices that affect women’s rights and understandings in Uzbek society. The report makes recommendations to close the gender gap and promote inclusive prosperity. CGA notes that since 2017, significant progress has been made in terms of gender equality in Uzbekistan. Notable achievements include the 2022 Labor Code, which provides for equal pay for women and removes job restrictions. In addition, 2023 amendments to the Criminal Code criminalize domestic violence. Consequently, the “Women, business and Rights” index released annually by the World Bank recognized Uzbekistan as one of the top five countries in terms of gender equality in 2024. Women’s access to education and health services has improved significantly. For example, during the period 2017-2022, the number of admissions to higher education institutions increased significantly, the number of men increased by three times to 29%, and the number of women increased by four times – to 27.4%. Young women face higher unemployment rates than males (15.5% vs 10%), and the share of young women who were not in employment, education, or training (NEET) has reached 42%, compared to 8.8% for males. In addition, the gender pay gap is significant, with women earning 34% less than men, which is more than the global average of 20%. Women’s low wages and employment rates directly hinder economic growth and exacerbate poverty in Uzbekistan. If women participated in the country’s economy on an equal basis with men, the national income in Uzbekistan would increase by 29%. Simply equalizing men’s and women's wages would lift more than 700,000 people out of poverty. However, gender norms, which place women primarily in charge of caregiving and household tasks, hinder progress towards gender equality and inclusive economic growth. The report states that the authorities must address gender inequality to realize Uzbekistan’s full economic potential. These include entrenched social norms that limit women’s economic participation, disparities in access to higher education in STEM fields, health care limitations, deteriorating family planning options, incomplete protection from gender-based violence, and the disparity of women in leadership roles.

Uzbekistan Plans to Earn $300 Million a Year From Medical Tourism

Nuz.uz reports that Uzbekistan plans to earn $300 million annually from medical services and tourism. At the meeting chaired by President Mirziyoyev, the program “Medical Hospitality” was announced, under which the budget will cover the costs of private clinics for international certification and participation in foreign exhibitions. Doctors traveling abroad to advertise and provide diagnostic services will be reimbursed for transportation and accommodation expenses. In addition, value-added tax will be refunded to foreign patients visiting clinics. "Last year, more than 60,000 foreign tourists were treated in 86 sanatoriums and medical institutions of the country. Suppose the number of such institutions is increased. In that case, it is possible to attract an additional 100,000 foreign patients, making it possible to earn $300 million a year from medical services,” the publication notes. Zumrad Bekatova, a member of the Legislative Chamber of the Oliy Majlis, said that Uzbekistan is paying special attention to expanding the network of private medical organizations, diversifying their activities, and strengthening their material and technical base. However, despite these efforts, only two private clinics have received international certification, and the share of foreign patients has yet to exceed 12%.

Peace for Women and Children Returning from Syria to Tajikistan

Dozens of women and children returning from Syria have now been reunited with their loved ones in Tajikistan and according to the  Ministry of Health, are adapting to a peaceful life. The return of Tajik citizens, primarily women and children, who left for Syria's combat zone and fell prey to terrorist organizations, has continued  since 2022. On 27 September 2023, the Government of Tajikistan introduced a program to aid their rehabilitation. According to , Kudratullo Kurbonzoda, head of the Social Protection Department of Tajikistan's Ministry of Health and Social Protection,  over the past two years, 334 people, including 259 children, have been returned from Syrian prisons to their homeland and having passed through the program's three stages, are settling in well. “Their health and mental state have recovered," commented Kurbonzoda Ku, adding that thanks to the program, even those without documents, such as passports or birth certificates, have been able to contact their families wherever they are in the country. A further 47 people who returned in April are currently  under the supervision of the agency's specialists and receiving assistance from doctors and psychologists, as well as from education and internal affairs officials. Referencing  the program's guidelines, Kurbonzoda added that in addition to financial and material assistance, the government  recommended the placement of  the children in schools and kindergartens, and provision of training and jobs for women.

UNICEF Donates Vehicles to Distribute Vaccines in Kyrgyzstan

The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) and UNICEF have donated 16 vaccine transport vehicles to Kyrgyzstan. The special cars were provided to the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health to increase immunization rates across the country. The vehicles will help improve the distribution of vaccines from regional to district storage facilities, ensuring their timely availability in remote regions of the country. “Vaccines against dangerous diseases such as measles, rubella, or pertussis require special storage and transportation conditions to be safe and effective. Therefore, improving this infrastructure directly affects the availability of life-saving vaccines for every child in Kyrgyzstan,” said UNICEF's acting representative in Kyrgyzstan Cristina Bruggiolo. Akchabar reports that this is the first batch of 26 vehicles that the ministry will receive. The remaining ten cars will arrive in the country by the end of July.

Uzbekistan Set to Maximize Tourism

On 3 June, Uzbekistan President Shavkat Mirziyoyev chaired a government meeting to review plans for the forthcoming year to attract 11 million foreign tourists and increase revenue from tourism to $2.5 billion. It was stated that every dollar currently invested in tourism generates 3-4 dollars for the industry’s future and each new job created in the tourism sector spawns two jobs in related industries. Officials reported that to encourage growth, procedures for running tourism businesses have been simplified and specialized policing created to ensure the safety of tourists. Given the year-on-year increase in extreme tourism, Uzbekistan is developing a program to meet demand for access to its wilder regions. To expand tourism around the country’s natural lakes, a decision was made to auction land for the construction of water parks and other attractions around these scenic shores. Triggered by the pandemic, the demand for medical and recreational tourism has soared and last year alone, over 60 thousand foreign visitors were treated in Uzbekistan’s sanatoriums and medical institutions. In response and based on practices in South Korea, Turkey, and India, the government has launched a “Medical Hospitality” initiative. From now on, costs incurred by private clinics for international certification and participation in overseas exhibitions to promote their services, will be covered by the state. In addition, VAT will be refunded on payments made by foreign patients attending Uzbekistan’s clinics. To maximize its potential, the president recommended the launch of a global advertising campaign to demonstrate to the full, the diversity of Uzbekistan’s tourist industry.