• KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01154 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00214 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09341 -0.74%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 209

Campuses of Three Foreign Universities to Open in Kazakhstan

Student campuses of three major foreign universities will open in Kazakhstan. Branches of the British De Montfort and Coventry universities will appear in Almaty and Astana, and a branch of South Korean university, Woosong, will be located in Turkestan. This was announced by the Minister of Science and Higher Education of Kazakhstan, Sayasat Nurbek, at a press conference of the SCC. According to him, the agency plans to turn Kazakhstan into a major academic center of the Eurasian region, making it necessary to attract established foreign brands to the country. Nurbek stated that "23 academic partnerships have been created and opened in just two years. Campuses of 3 reputable foreign universities will open in Kazakhstan in 5 categories. We have permitted foreign universities in Kazakhstan to invest their money in constructing or purchasing a building and training in a foreign format. They work according to special decrees of the government, such as De Montfort University in Almaty. Next year, the first graduates will be there. This British university will award a bachelor's degree based on its format and academic admission policy." Having received a foreign degree, graduates of these educational institutions will then be able to work in the university's country of origin.

USAID Supports Central Asian Women Working in Hospitality

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the International Association of Businesswomen “Tadbirkor Ayol” last week hosted a Central Asian Conference on “Women of Central Asia in the Hospitality Business: Current Challenges and Opportunities”. The event in Tashkent attracted some 200 women entrepreneurs, professionals, and industry experts from Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan to discuss achievements, trends, and challenges in the region’s hospitality sector. As reported by the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan, the conference focused on service quality, digitalization, and modern standards in tourism, culminating in recommendations to enhance regional cooperation in tourism and hospitality. Praising the resilience and creativity of women in the hospitality industry and emphasizing their role in the sector’s future, Edward Michalski, USAID Deputy Mission Director in Uzbekistan, commented: “Investing in women and girls is essential to transforming communities. When women do better, families do better, communities do better, and countries do better.” Gulnora Makhmudova, Chairwoman of “Tadbirkor Ayol,” noted that the growing importance of the region’s hotel business and the increasing involvement of women, had spurred the association into launching “Women in the Hotel Business: Hospitality from the Future;” a project aimed to introduce innovation and digitalization in the hospitality sector. Since its launch in April 2024, with support from USAID, the project has provided training for 115 women in modern hotel management in Tashkent, Andijan, and Samarkand.  

International Development Association Allocates $25 million to Kyrgyz Universities.

The International Development Association (IDA) has announced it will  provide Kyrgyzstan with a $25 million interest-free loan over 50 years, with a ten-year grace period. The loan includes an allocation of $19.7 million to be divided between  five of the country's universities. The Academy of Medicine will receive $4 million, $1.3 million of which will be invested in laboratories for biochemical research, genetics, and molecular biology; $900,000 on equipment for pathomorphological research, and $800,000 on equipment for a laboratory for pharmaceutical bioequivalence studies. The remaining $1 million will be spent on laboratories, IT equipment, and software for new and expanded educational programs. Kyrgyz State Technical University will be allocated $3.2 million,  $2.2 million of which will be used for equipment and software for three laboratories, IT equipment, and software. The Kyrgyz National University (KNU) will also receive $3.2 million with $1.7 million allocated for scientific and IT equipment and software for teaching laboratories. The remaining $1.5 million will be spent on laboratories, IT equipment, and software for educational programs. Osh State University (OSU) will receive $2.8 million, with $300,000 reserved for the purchase of an ultrasound machine for breast examination, $1.5 million for an MRI machine, and $1 million for laboratory and IT equipment and software programs. The University of Agriculture has been allocated  $3.75 million, with $800,000 to be used to purchase equipment for an infectious animal disease diagnostic laboratory, $1.2 million for molecular genetic equipment, $550,000 for equipment for a histology and immunohistochemistry laboratory, $400,000 for equipment for the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Food Safety, and $800,000 for laboratory and IT equipment and software. The national budget will cover $5.3 million of the loan funds whilst the universities will pay off the remaining amount through revenue provided by laboratory services.

Kazakhstan Actions ‘Lifelong Learning’

On 5 June, the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of the Population of Kazakhstan issued a report on the success of courses delivered by the Skills Enbek vocational training platform. Since the beginning of 2024, 53.5 thousand citizens, including 27.2 thousand unemployed, have completed online courses conducted by Skills Enbek and a total of 427.2 thousand Kazakhs are now registered on the platform. Of the 27.2 thousand unemployed who have completed their training, around 8 thousand are youths based mainly in the regions of Aktobe, Turkestan, Kyzylorda, and Zhambyl regions, and the city of Shymkent. The platform offers 490 wide-ranging courses, lasting between 1-72 hours. The most popular courses last May, included: “Organizing a sales department in a hotel”, “Salesperson”, “Insurance agent”, “Individual assistant to accompany people with limited mobility,” and “Fundamentals of social entrepreneurship”. At present, 254 of the courses are free and the platform now plans to waive charges for training in various sectors including accommodation, food, construction, housing and communal services, social services, finance and accounting, and information technology. By expanding levels of education and professionalism in the country's population, the platform aims to both stimulate career development and promote the concept of “lifelong learning.”    

Two Uzbek Universities Enter the QS World Rankings

The higher education analytics firm Quacquarelli Symonds has published its latest annual table of the world’s best universities -- the QS World University Rankings 2025. For the first time in the ratings' history, two Uzbek universities — the Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanization Engineers (TIIAME) National Research University (547th place) and the Mirzo Ulugbek National University of Uzbekistan (781st place) — were included in the ranking. Under the QS "academic reputation" indicator, TIIAME National Research University is among the top 300 universities in the world. The National University of Uzbekistan has produced renowned scientists who have made significant contributions to the advancement of global science. The Times of Central Asia has previously written about Botir Kobilov, who received a doctoral degree from Harvard Business School. Damir Musayev, another Uzbek, defended his doctoral thesis in genetics at Yale University in the United States and received his Doctor of Science degree.

Kazakhstan’s Bolashak Program: More Trouble Than It’s Worth?

In 1993, Nursultan Nazarbayev, the first president of Kazakhstan, established the Bolashak ('Future' in Kazakh) International Scholarship. Its goal was to help gifted Kazakhstani youth obtain a high-quality foreign education. However, the program is currently mired in scandals with alarming regularity. Of course, most of these clickbait stories are minor — such as a 2022 incident with the famous singer Dimash Qudaibergen. He was selected for the Bolashak Program and went abroad before changing his mind. He tried to transfer the scholarship to someone else but was forced to return the money to the state. Still, several cases indicate that behind the scenes at the Center for International Programs, which administers the scholarship, something is not right. So far, no one has intervened – the program is still running – but the latest scandal could attract the attention of Kazakhstan's president Kassym-Jomart Tokayev. And he has already expressed dissatisfaction with some of the conditions of the scholarship. Getting the president’s attention Let’s unpack the current scandal, which has to be extinguished by a senior official such as the minister of education and science. Kazakhstani Natalya Vorobyova recorded a video message to Tokayev, saying that in 2016, she and her colleague Makpal Daribaeva acted as debt guarantors for her former colleague Valeria Gavrilenko, who had completed the Bolashak Program. According to Vorobyova, Gavrilenko “in 2019, conspiring with the center’s employees… illegally withdrew two apartments [that had been pledged to the center] as collateral and went off to live in the UK.” Now, her debt – graduates of the program are required to work in Kazakhstani government agencies for 3-5 years (depending on the region) – has to be repaid by the guarantors, i.e., by Vorobyova and Daribaeva. They owe about KZT30 million ($60,000). The press service of the Center for International Programs explained that since Gavrilenko evaded paying off the debt, the agreement transferred it to the guarantors. Just days later, on May 30, Sayasat Nurbek, who heads Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Education and Science, intervened, saying that an agreement had been reached with Gavrilenko whereby she would pay off her debt, with a corresponding agreement already signed by her. “Since Gavrilenko took it upon herself to fully return the money, an agreement was signed with her, and she has begun to pay back the money. Accordingly, the claims against the guarantors are withdrawn. Nevertheless, we were forced to initiate a case against all three obligation-bearers. We were forced to do this because they are jointly liable under the law. If Gavrilenko pays the full amount, the claims against the guarantors will be dropped. Unfortunately, they seem to have been advised incorrectly. They felt threatened that they would be forced to pay full damages. Today, we are concentrating all claims on Gavrilenko,” Nurbek said in the Senate as he was answering questions from journalists. As for the third party in this scandal – which, according to the minister, is also responsible – it is the former president of the Center for International...

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