• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 7

Great Women in the History of the Kyrgyz Republic

Nestled in the heart of Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan boasts a rich tapestry of history woven by extraordinary women who have played pivotal roles in shaping the nation. From political pioneers to cultural icons, these women have left an indelible mark on the nation. To mark International Women’s Day, we remember some great women in the history of Kyrgyzstan, acknowledging their contribution and enduring impact.  Kurmanjan Datka[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15382" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Photo: Carl Gustav Mannerheim Known as the "Queen of the South," Kurmanjan Datka, the “Tsaritsa of Alai” was a courageous and noble woman who was not afraid to break with tradition. An important politician, in the second half of the eighteen century Kurmanjan ruled over the region wisely. Seeking both compromise and fighting for the rights of her people, she played a crucial role in unifying the Kyrgyz tribes during a tumultuous period, when her leadership and diplomacy skills were instrumental in maintaining peace. Aside from Kurmanjan, no other woman has ever been honored with the title "Datka" - meaning "general" - in the history of Kyrgyzstan. Kurmanjan was the only woman to rule over the Kyrgyz nation. Recognized as the "mother of the nation," 2011 was declared the year of Kurmanjan Datka in the Republic, where her face adorns banknotes. Olga Manuilova[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15302" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Photo: ilgeri.kg Olga Manuilova's contributions were valued highly by the Government of the Kyrgyz SSR, which in 1954 recognized her with the prestigious title, People's Artist of the Kyrgyz SSR. In acknowledgment of her outstanding work, she was also honored with many other awards, including the Order of the Red Banner of Labor, the Badge of Honor, and the medal For Valorous Labor. Additionally, Manuilova received commendations in the form of diplomas from the Supreme Soviet of the Republic. Among her notable creations were artistic masterpieces such as "Builders of the Great Chui Canal," "In Aid of the Front" from 1942, and a monument to General Panfilov, which entwined her work with the fate of the nation. These remarkable works earned Manuilova the distinguished title of "Honored Art Worker of the Kyrgyz SSR." This recognition underscored the significant impact of her artistic endeavors and highlighted her exceptional role in contributing to the cultural and artistic heritage of Kyrgyzstan. In 1973, a main belt asteroid was named after her. Urkuya Salieva[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15305" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Illustration: limon.kg At the age of just seventeen, in 1927 Salieva became the secretary of her local Komsomol cell in the Osh Oblast, indicating her early inclination towards political activism. The following year, she defied societal expectations by assuming the role of chairperson for the council of her birth village of Murkut. Displaying exceptional leadership, Salieva was elected chairperson of the Kyzyl-Asker collective farm despite opposition from affluent individuals who underestimated her ability to navigate the challenges of this role. Showing devotion to her people, Salieva worked tirelessly to surpass all expectations, securing a seat on the Central Executive Committee of the Kyrgyz...

Great Women in the History of Kazakhstan

Women have played an important role in the history of Kazakhstan, making a significant contribution to the development of the country. They have shown courage, determination and talent in various walks of life, from politics and education to culture. Today, their role is being recognized, and women in Kazakhstan are becoming more aware of their actions than ever before. "I have always been inspired by our women, the women of the great steppe," Karina from Taraz told TCA, "especially in the field of culture, because at that time, such professions were considered solely for men. Thanks to them, we now have the opportunity not only to work in such professions, but also to become respected individuals." "Because of them, I have the opportunity to become whatever I want to be," Alina from Astana told TCA. "Their talent and drive has given freedom to the next generation." Today, on International Women's Day, we take a look at some of the outstanding women whose lives have had a fundamental impact on the course of the nation's history. Tomyris[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15001" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]A still from the movie, "Tomyris" The name of Tomyris, the Queen of the Massagetes, is well-known in the culture of Kazakhstan, and is a source of pride and inspiration for Kazakhstani women. Queen Tomyris fought the mighty Persian king, Cyrus the Great, demonstrating her military prowess and intransigence. Tomyris won the battle, in which most of the Persian Army was destroyed. According to a legend, she placed Cyrus’ head in a wine fur filled with blood, saying: "You thirsted for blood, king of the Persians, so drink it now to your heart's content." Thus, Tomyris brought peace to her people. Nazipa Kul zhanova[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15002" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Photo: kaznu.kz Nazipa Kul zhanova was the first accredited female teacher in Kazakhstan and the first female journalist on the editorial staff of Yenbekshi Kazakh (Working Kazakh). An educator, ethnographer and translator, she became the preeminent specialist in the preparation of the Kazakh alphabet. Among other things, her philosophical articles addressed the role of a woman's place in public life and in the family. A proponent of the importance of education and the active participation of women in the progress and development society, Kulzhanova stated that "A woman is the mother of the people. Only an educated, skillful, free woman is able to raise her people to the level of advanced nations." Nagima Arykova[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15003" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Photo: Rate.kz Nagima Arykova was an outstanding woman stateswoman and one of the leading lights of the women's movement in Kazakhstan. She was the author of "The Role of a Woman Commissioner" and "The Struggle for the Rights of Working Women in Kazakhstan." Arykova was the editor of the newspaper Kazakh capital, and was the first woman to become a leading member of the government of Kazakhstan. Manshuk Mametova[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="15004" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Photo: pochta-polevaya.ru Manshuk Mametova was a machine-gunner during the Second World War and...

Great Women in the History of Turkmenistan

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, we remember outstanding Turkmen women, each of whom has left an indelible mark on the history of the country.   Sabira Atayeva Photo: kino-teatr.ru A famous theater and film actress, Sabira Atayeva devoted over 55 years of her life to her performances. Born in Ashgabat in 1917, Atayeva grew up in an orphanage, but was selected for her talent by a special commission to study in Moscow at VGITIS. During her career, Atayeva played a huge number of roles, not only in Turkmenistan, but also in films made by studios in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Ukraine. Named as both a laureate of the State Prize named after Magtymguly and a People's Artist of the USSR, she is fondly remembered for her parts in the films, “Daughter-in-Law” (1972), “The Kugitang Tragedy” (1978), and the famed historical epic set in the time of Genghis Khan, “The Fall of Otrar” (1991).   Maya (Mamajan) Kuliyeva Photo: famousfix.com Raised in an orphanage from the age of eight, Kuliyeva attended the Turkmenistan branch of the Moscow Conservatory before joining the Turkmen Theater of Opera and Ballet. A lyric soprano, she became the first to perform roles from Western operas on stage in Turkmenistan. Her repertoire included roles in The Tsar's Bride by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Faust by Charles Gounod, and Madama Butterfly by Giacomo Puccini. Beyond the stage, she also appeared in several films. Kuliyeva received a host of awards throughout her career, including the titles of Honored Artist of the Turkmen SSR, People's Artist of the Turkmen SSR, People's Artist of the USSR, and Hero of Turkmenistan. Additionally, she served as a deputy of the Supreme Council of the Turkmen SSR during its second and fourth sessions. A Communist Party organizer during the Soviet-era, she continued to receive recognition after the dissolution of the USSR. In 2010, it was reported that she still had final say over all operas performed in Turkmenistan. Kuliyeva passed away in 2018, shortly before her 98th birthday, but her legacy lives on. In 2019, the Turkmen National Conservatory was renamed in her honor and the Museum of Maya Kuliyeva opened, and in 2020 a concert was staged in Ashgabat to commemorate the centenary of her birth.   Aksoltan Atayeva Photo: UNICEF.org A diplomat and politician, Aksoltan Atayeva has been the Permanent Representative of Turkmenistan to the United Nations since February 23rd 1995, making her the most senior Permanent Representative from any nation currently serving. A graduate of Medical Sciences, Atayeva has held numerous other posts, including Minister of Public Health, Minister of Social Security, President of the Trade Unions of Turkmenistan, and has been a member of the People's Council since 1993. Atayeva is currently the Ambassador of Turkmenistan to Cuba, Brazil, and Venezuela. In 2019, she was named a Hero of Turkmenistan.   Maya-Gozel Aimedova Photo: famousfix.com Maya-Gozel Aimedova is a celebrated actor who first graced the screen in "Incident in Dash-Kala" (1961). In this film, she portrayed a teacher battling against...

Great Women in the History of Tajikistan

On the occasion of the day of solidarity of women in the struggle for rights and emancipation, we remember outstanding Tajik women, each of whom has left her own unique mark on the history of the nation.   Malika Sabirova Photo: halva.tj A Soviet-era ballerina, Malika Sabirova left her indelible mark on the history of the arts as the prima ballerina of the Aini Tajik Academic Opera and Ballet Theater. Her exceptional talent was acknowledged on the world stage after she won a gold medal in the first International Ballet Competition in Moscow in 1969, which led to her being awarded the title of People's Artist of the USSR. Sabirova not only performed her roles magnificently on stage, but also became a driving force in the development of Tajik ballet. A pupil of the outstanding Galina Ulanova, she inscribed her name in the list of outstanding Soviet ballerinas as the “princess of Tajik ballet,” working tirelessly from the age of ten until her untimely demise just shy of her fortieth birthday.   Zebiniso Rustamova Photo: asiaplustj.info Representing the Soviet Union, Zebiniso Rustamova won the world and team championship in archery in 1975, setting a new record. She was also an integral part of the team that won the world championship in 1985 and 1987, and European team championship in 1976, 1984 and 1986. In 1976, Rustamova won the bronze medal at the Montreal Olympics. A legendary athlete in her homeland, from 1992-2000 she served as the President of the Tajikistan Olympic Committee.   Malika Kalandarova Still from the film "Bride and Groom" Known for her extraordinary talent in the art of folk dance, Malika Kalandarova made a significant impact with her unique blend of grace and strength earning her an international reputation. An Honored People's Artist of the USSR and the Tajik SSR, Kalandarova's performances were characterized by her striking plasticity, with her career also involving her work as a stage director and a tutor. In 1993, she emigrated to the U.S., opening the Malika International Dance School. In 2020, she was commemorated with a stamp by the Post of Tajikistan, underscoring her cultural significance.   Sarajan Yusupova Photo: Creative Commons Sarajan Yusupova was a Soviet geochemist, Honored Worker of Science and Technology of Tajikistan, an academician at the Academy of Sciences of the Tajik SSR, and a Doctor of Geological and Mineralogical Sciences. The first woman academician in geochemistry in the history of Tajikistan, with her research on the celestine deposits from which radioactive strontium is extracted, she earned global recognition in the scientific community. Yusupova also served as a deputy of the Supreme Soviet of the Tajik SSR in two convocations.   Sofia Hakimova Photo: asiaplustj.info An eminent medical scientist, Sofia Hakimova carved her place in history by becoming the first Tajik woman to attain a Doctorate of Medical Sciences at the age of just 33. Her illustrious career saw her become a member of the Academy of Medical Sciences and earn the title of Honored Scientist of...

Great Women in the History of Uzbekistan

The history of Uzbekistan is awash with outstanding female personalities who played a key role in the formation of the nation. From defenders of rights to creative geniuses, they became pioneers, leaving their mark in various fields. To mark International Women’s Day, we remember some of the great women of Uzbekistan, revealing their influence on culture, politics and social movements.   Nozimahonim Uzbek Women, Tashkent, 1924; Photo: archive.is Born in the Jizzakh Region in 1870, Nozimahonim became the first woman journalist of the Jadidism-era, playing a key role in the struggle for the empowerment of women in Uzbekistan. In her poems, she raised questions about education for women and inequalities in familial relationships. Published in the newspaper, Tarakkiy, in her poem "Afsus" (translated from Uzbek as "Unfortunately"), Nozimahon wrote: "How wonderful that the night of tyranny has come to an end," reflecting her hope for the end of the long struggle for women's liberation and rights. In addition to her work as a journalist and poet, Nozimahonim worked to educate girls as an “Otin,” the traditional name for women who read and taught the Qur'an. Nozimahonim died in 1924; no known image of her exists.   Sobira Kholdarova Photo: qalampir.uz Upon being sent to an orphanage at age thirteen, Sobira Kholdarova completed a literacy course in just six months. At the age of just seventeen, she became one of the editors of the newspaper, Yangi yul (New Way). In 1924, at a rally against inequality in Tashkent, Kholdarova cast of her burqa and, shortly thereafter, joined the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. In 1926, despite having a two-year-old son, she was selected to study in Moscow, becoming the first woman from Uzbekistan to be trained as a professional journalist. Despite spending over fifteen years in exile in Siberia for allegedly “losing class consciousness,” both before and after her return to the press in the 1950s, Kholdarova made a hugely significant contribution to journalism.   Zulfiya Umidova Image: facebook.com/tashkentretrospective The first female physician and doctor of medical sciences in Uzbekistan, Zulfiya Ibragimovna Umidova made a profound impact on the medical field. Her noteworthy contributions lie primarily in her research on the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic. For her doctoral dissertation, she conducted an in-depth examination of how Tashkent's climate affects the human cardiovascular system and the specificities of myocardial infarction. Following the massive earthquake in Tashkent in 1966, she expanded her research to study the effects of earthquakes on hypertension. Her prolific academic journey is evidenced by her 80 scientific publications, and the supervision of 32 candidate and three doctoral theses. Umidova’s legacy continues to inspire future generations in the field of medicine.   Nelya Ataullayeva Photo: mytashkent.uz Nelya Ataullayeva initially embarked on her career as an actress, but she soon made history by becoming the first female documentary filmmaker in Uzbekistan. Her inaugural documentary paid tribute to eminent women in Uzbekistan, including the poet Zulfiya, scientist Professor Irina Raikova, medical doctor Zulfiya Umidova, and...

The Last Emir of Bukhara – In the Shadow of Antiquity

The seventh largest city in Uzbekistan, the history of Bukhara is swathed in legends which stretch back for millennia and can be traced to the period of Aryan immigration into the region. After passing through the hands of Alexander the Great, the Bactrians, the Kushan Empire and many others, Bukhara became an epicenter of Persian culture in medieval Asia. With the rise of the Caliphate, by the end of the ninth century Bukhara was one of the most significant Islamic and cultural sites in the region. Throughout its history, Bukhara has been nourished by merchants and travelers, establishing itself as a major hub of trade and crafts on the Silk Road. Today, in the orange early morning light, women holding parasols walk their children to school down gravel alleyways to the ever-present hum of air-con units. Broom-wielding figures in high-viz orange jackets cast bulbous shadows as they sweep the dust from side to side. As the sun arcs towards its zenith, a haze develops, the heat so overpowering that even the hawkers lose the will to sell. Weaving past scant pedestrians, infrequent marshrutkas head out of town towards the glittering Summer Palace of Bukhara’s last Emir, the outsized Sayyid Mir Muhammad Alim Khan. Beyond the imposing majolica tiled gateway of the Russian-built Sitora-I Mohi Khosa – Palace of the Stars and the Magnificent Moon - the banqueting hall contains an elaborate bronze chandelier from Poland weighing half a ton. To gasps of awe, Bukhara’s first electric light shone from it during the 1910s thanks to a fifty-watt generator.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="12020" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]An avenue of quince trees leads to an ostentation of peacocks parading around a voluminous pool, where the Emir’s harem used to frolic. Raised on a platform high above them, the Emir would sit upon his gilded throne, bejeweled and decked in golden threads, choosing his lady for the night. Escaping the conflict between reformers and imams, and ever more dependent upon the overlords who would inevitably bring about his downfall, Amir Khan spent his last years as ruler cocooned in the Summer Palace, sating his gluttonous appetite from a glass-fronted Russian refrigerator.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13877" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Putting his lot in with the reformers, then switching sides in the face of the mullah’s power, in his final years the last Emir was a leaf in the wind. These were the dark days of mass executions, book burnings, and an intellectual exodus from the Emirate. When the ripples from the Bolshevik Revolution reached his kingdom, Alim Khan declared a Holy War upon the Russians and their reformist allies, the Young Bukharans. With Russian gunners initially forced back by frenzied, knife-wielding true believers, tit-for-tat retributions took place before, with their inevitable victory sealed, the Red Army set about pillaging and murdering their vanquished foes. On September 2nd 1920, soldiers raised the Red Banner from the bombed-out lantern of the Kalon Minaret. From the ninth-century Pit of the Herbalists to the Ismail Samani Mausoleum, Bukhara isn’t about...

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