• KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09272 -0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 9

Great Women in the History of Uzbekistan

The history of Uzbekistan is awash with outstanding female personalities who played a key role in the formation of the nation. From defenders of rights to creative geniuses, they became pioneers, leaving their mark in various fields. To mark International Women’s Day, we remember some of the great women of Uzbekistan, revealing their influence on culture, politics and social movements.   Nozimahonim Uzbek Women, Tashkent, 1924; Photo: archive.is Born in the Jizzakh Region in 1870, Nozimahonim became the first woman journalist of the Jadidism-era, playing a key role in the struggle for the empowerment of women in Uzbekistan. In her poems, she raised questions about education for women and inequalities in familial relationships. Published in the newspaper, Tarakkiy, in her poem "Afsus" (translated from Uzbek as "Unfortunately"), Nozimahon wrote: "How wonderful that the night of tyranny has come to an end," reflecting her hope for the end of the long struggle for women's liberation and rights. In addition to her work as a journalist and poet, Nozimahonim worked to educate girls as an “Otin,” the traditional name for women who read and taught the Qur'an. Nozimahonim died in 1924; no known image of her exists.   Sobira Kholdarova Photo: qalampir.uz Upon being sent to an orphanage at age thirteen, Sobira Kholdarova completed a literacy course in just six months. At the age of just seventeen, she became one of the editors of the newspaper, Yangi yul (New Way). In 1924, at a rally against inequality in Tashkent, Kholdarova cast of her burqa and, shortly thereafter, joined the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. In 1926, despite having a two-year-old son, she was selected to study in Moscow, becoming the first woman from Uzbekistan to be trained as a professional journalist. Despite spending over fifteen years in exile in Siberia for allegedly “losing class consciousness,” both before and after her return to the press in the 1950s, Kholdarova made a hugely significant contribution to journalism.   Zulfiya Umidova Image: facebook.com/tashkentretrospective The first female physician and doctor of medical sciences in Uzbekistan, Zulfiya Ibragimovna Umidova made a profound impact on the medical field. Her noteworthy contributions lie primarily in her research on the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic. For her doctoral dissertation, she conducted an in-depth examination of how Tashkent's climate affects the human cardiovascular system and the specificities of myocardial infarction. Following the massive earthquake in Tashkent in 1966, she expanded her research to study the effects of earthquakes on hypertension. Her prolific academic journey is evidenced by her 80 scientific publications, and the supervision of 32 candidate and three doctoral theses. Umidova’s legacy continues to inspire future generations in the field of medicine.   Nelya Ataullayeva Photo: mytashkent.uz Nelya Ataullayeva initially embarked on her career as an actress, but she soon made history by becoming the first female documentary filmmaker in Uzbekistan. Her inaugural documentary paid tribute to eminent women in Uzbekistan, including the poet Zulfiya, scientist Professor Irina Raikova, medical doctor Zulfiya Umidova, and...

The Last Emir of Bukhara – In the Shadow of Antiquity

The seventh largest city in Uzbekistan, the history of Bukhara is swathed in legends which stretch back for millennia and can be traced to the period of Aryan immigration into the region. After passing through the hands of Alexander the Great, the Bactrians, the Kushan Empire and many others, Bukhara became an epicenter of Persian culture in medieval Asia. With the rise of the Caliphate, by the end of the ninth century Bukhara was one of the most significant Islamic and cultural sites in the region. Throughout its history, Bukhara has been nourished by merchants and travelers, establishing itself as a major hub of trade and crafts on the Silk Road. Today, in the orange early morning light, women holding parasols walk their children to school down gravel alleyways to the ever-present hum of air-con units. Broom-wielding figures in high-viz orange jackets cast bulbous shadows as they sweep the dust from side to side. As the sun arcs towards its zenith, a haze develops, the heat so overpowering that even the hawkers lose the will to sell. Weaving past scant pedestrians, infrequent marshrutkas head out of town towards the glittering Summer Palace of Bukhara’s last Emir, the outsized Sayyid Mir Muhammad Alim Khan. Beyond the imposing majolica tiled gateway of the Russian-built Sitora-I Mohi Khosa – Palace of the Stars and the Magnificent Moon - the banqueting hall contains an elaborate bronze chandelier from Poland weighing half a ton. To gasps of awe, Bukhara’s first electric light shone from it during the 1910s thanks to a fifty-watt generator.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="12020" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]An avenue of quince trees leads to an ostentation of peacocks parading around a voluminous pool, where the Emir’s harem used to frolic. Raised on a platform high above them, the Emir would sit upon his gilded throne, bejeweled and decked in golden threads, choosing his lady for the night. Escaping the conflict between reformers and imams, and ever more dependent upon the overlords who would inevitably bring about his downfall, Amir Khan spent his last years as ruler cocooned in the Summer Palace, sating his gluttonous appetite from a glass-fronted Russian refrigerator.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13877" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Putting his lot in with the reformers, then switching sides in the face of the mullah’s power, in his final years the last Emir was a leaf in the wind. These were the dark days of mass executions, book burnings, and an intellectual exodus from the Emirate. When the ripples from the Bolshevik Revolution reached his kingdom, Alim Khan declared a Holy War upon the Russians and their reformist allies, the Young Bukharans. With Russian gunners initially forced back by frenzied, knife-wielding true believers, tit-for-tat retributions took place before, with their inevitable victory sealed, the Red Army set about pillaging and murdering their vanquished foes. On September 2nd 1920, soldiers raised the Red Banner from the bombed-out lantern of the Kalon Minaret. From the ninth-century Pit of the Herbalists to the Ismail Samani Mausoleum, Bukhara isn’t about...

From Steppe to Subcontinent: The Indianisation of the Huns and Śakas from Kazakhstan

The historical connections between Kazakhstan and India span thousands of years, with the migration of Huns and Śakas from Central Asia to India playing a significant role in shaping the history of these two nations. The Huns, first mentioned by Roman historian Tacitus in the late first century A.D., originated near the Caspian Sea, in present-day Kazakhstan. They migrated to India, where they had a profound influence on the local population. Notable among the Huns was Toramana, who, around 500 A.D., launched attacks on India, eventually settling in Malwa in Central India and establishing himself as a powerful ruler. These historical ties are evident in archaeological finds in Kazakhstan, such as the 45 Hun burial mounds discovered near Almaty in the valley of the River Kegen in 2015. Similarly, the Saka people, another group of nomadic Eastern Iranian peoples, left their mark in the region with several burial mounds located near Almaty. The most notable among these was found in 1969, when the Kazakh archaeologist, Kemal Akishev, discovered a teenage Saka prince adorned with almost 4,800 gold items in an Issyk kurgan. Known as the “Golden Man,” the figure was adopted as one of the symbols of modern Kazakhstan, with a likeness standing atop the Independence Monument on the central square of Almaty.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13850" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]In India, the influence of the Huns is palpable in places like Gwalior, a metropolis recently designated as a Creative City of Music by the UNESCO Creative Cities Network. The earliest historical record of Gwalior is an inscription by the Hun ruler Mihirakula, the second and last Alchon Hun king of the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent between 502 and 530 CE, referencing his father, Toramana, as a "a ruler of the earth.” Mihirakula was a patron of Shaivism, and his reign left a lasting impact on the Indian landscape. The historical connections between Kazakhstan and India continue to be celebrated today, with India being one of the first countries to recognize Kazakhstan's independence. The two countries actively cooperate under various multilateral fora, including the Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA), the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), and United Nations organizations.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13849" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]This historical connectivity is deeply rooted in the migration of two nomadic groups, the Huns and Śakas, from what is now known as Kazakhstan to India. Both these communities, though distinct in their origins - with the Huns being Turanic and the Śakas of Iranian descent - migrated to India, embraced the local culture, and significantly influenced the country's history and development. The first Saka king in India was Maues, also known as Moga, who established Saka dominion in areas covering Gandhara, the Indus Valley, and regions that are part of present-day Afghanistan. The Śakas ruled over vast territories, including the north-west frontier, Punjab, Sindh, Kashmir, western Uttar Pradesh, Saurashtra, Kathiawar, Rajputana, Malwa, and the north Konkan belt of Maharashtra. Saka ruler Nahapana held sway over Kathiawar and neighboring territories,...

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