• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 40

Kazakhstan Faces Unprecedented Threats from Floods, Droughts, Locust Infestations

Experts are predicting a severe drought in Kazakhstan. Additionally, locusts are expected to invade the country, and the flood situation will be even worse next year. That's according to Kazakhstani ecologist, Dmitry Kalmykov, who further explained to the Times of Central Asia in an interview that climate change in the region is already irreversible. "There is an increase in the frequency and intensity of all extreme weather events, including drought, floods, catastrophic precipitation, storms, downpours. Simply put, there are, unfortunately, going to be more of these phenomena. In addition, the weather patterns relative to the seasons are changing. Precipitation falls at a different time of the season than we have come to expect. For example, last year in August rains destroyed up to 30% of the harvest in some regions of Kazakhstan. Already now, there are disappointing forecasts going forward. But it's good to have time to prepare," Kalmykov told TCA. Today's floods are an indicator of a lack of clear forecasting, Kalmykov said, stating that the government had information about the amount of snowfall, ground freezing, and moisture reserves. Yet no conclusions were drawn on the severity of the risks of high groundwater levels. "All over the world, even in Kazakhstan's environmental laws, this is called the need to adapt the economy to climate change that has already occurred. This is declared by Kazakhstan at the international level, but it is not fulfilled. Literally everything needs to be changed, including agricultural practices, water management, construction and emergency preparedness. This is an evolutionary law - if a species does not adapt to changed conditions, it does not survive. It is time for us to act," he warned. Dmitry  Kalmykov   Kazakhstan and China are expected to create a research center to combat drought. The two countries' academies of sciences will jointly study problems of ecology and land resources. However, Kalmykov is skeptical about this initiative, as he doesn't believe in the authorities' ability to apply practical science in real life. Earlier, climate change expert Kirill Pavlov released a drought forecast for Kazakhstan, which he attributes to the El Niño effect. Yesterday, TCA published an interview with Dr. Petr Svoik, a Kazakhstani economist and former head of the Anti-monopoly Policy Committee, in which he emphasized the need for a supranational structure to combat climate change, so that each state cannot arbitrarily come to “its own truth… There is only one interstate structure - the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council - where ministers of the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) countries can, among other things, make decisions regarding water resources, but these decisions are made by consensus. There is no center that adopts arbitration and final order. That is, this body cannot resolve a water dispute between, say, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, and there is no economic effect," he stated. In an earlier interview with TCA, despite admitting that this could be “potentially the most severe disaster in over 80 years,” Deputy Foreign Minister of Kazakhstan, Roman Vassilenko, stated that Kazakhstan is “effectively handling the...

No Central Asian Country Can Cope With Floods, Droughts On Its Own, Expert Tells TCA

Lack of funds, the predominantly commodity-based nature of their economies, and the inability to reach agreement at a national level make the Central Asian republics vulnerable to natural disasters, Dr. Petr Svoik, Ph.D, a Kazakhstani economist and former head of the Anti=monopoly Policy Committee has told the Times of Central Asia.   Between Low Water and Flood Last year was marked by a drought in Kazakhstan, and at a critical moment for farmers, neighboring Kyrgyzstan stopped supplying water from the Kirov reservoir to the Zhambyl region, with the Kyrgyz authorities explaining that they were forced to cut off the water supply because of a severe shortage of water resources in the Chu and Talas Rivers for their own agricultural producers. Additionally in 2023, experts stated that the entire Eurasian region is entering a period of low water levels, which means agricultural and livestock sectors are threatened with permanent damage from drought. For Kazakhstan, the water problem is particularly acute, as many of the main water arteries are trans-boundary. This is true not only of the southern regions, but also along the Caspian Sea, which is supplied by Russia's Volga River, and the regions dependent on the Ural River in northwest Kazakhstan, which are at risk of drying up. However, the spring of 2024 has been marked by historic flooding. As of today, according to Kazakhstan's Ministry of Emergency Situations, ten regions of Kazakhstan are subject to flooding, with even multi-story buildings flooded in the regional centers of Kostanay, Aktobe and Atyrau. In a few days, according to the Ministry of Emergency Situations, a "wave" from Russia, where the major cities of Orsk and Orenburg are in danger, will come to Kazakhstan. Such a natural disaster hasn't happened in about 80 years, President Tokayev said. Drought and floods carry extraordinary costs, not to mention social damage. Every year, Kazakhstani villagers claim they are on the brink of ruin, and the state budget allocates significant funds to support them. As for floods, according to the World Bank, more than 1.1 million people have been affected in the five Central Asian states alone since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Each year, natural disasters in the region cause more than $10 billion in losses and affect the lives of nearly 3 million people. In Kazakhstan alone, 1.5 million people are at risk from river overflows, according to the Ministry of Emergency Situations. The country has allocated 7 billion tenge ($15.653 billion) for flood control in 2024 - but these funds are inadequate.   Political and Economic Losses  According to Petr Svoik, floods represent reputational losses for the authorities. The population loses property and faith in the authorities' ability to do something. Moreover, floods by definition have a high degree of predictability because of meteorological forecasts. "What is the problem of predicting the volume of water discharge in a couple of weeks, taking into account which reservoirs will overflow, and which ones need to be strengthened? For some reason, the authorities do not use...

Government and Communities are Tackling Kazakhstan’s Flood Crisis Together: An Interview with the Deputy Foreign Minister of Kazakhstan, Roman Vassilenko

Can you provide an overview of the current flood situation from the perspective of the affected areas and the population?   The current flood situation is serious, though it remains manageable. This year’s floods have exceeded those of 2012 and 2017, which were previously the most significant in the past three decades, making this potentially the most severe disaster in over 80 years. A combination of factors has contributed to this crisis. A late and rainy autumn, followed by a sharp temperature drop in December, resulted in soil freezing up to two meters deep. This was followed by heavy snowfall throughout the winter and a rapid warming and snowmelt in spring, causing significant water flow, mostly originating from the steppes, not from the rivers. Currently, flood relief operations are in progress across eight regions of the country. To date, over 75,000 people, including 17,000 children, have been evacuated. Additionally, more than 60,000 livestock have been relocated for their safety. Kazakhstan’s President, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, central and local governments, as well as volunteers, are collaborating effectively. Around-the-clock efforts are being made by approximately 17,000 emergency service workers, National Guard personnel, police and the military to safeguard cities and villages, supported by more than 25,000 volunteers. The operations are utilizing over 80 boats, as well as 15 aircraft and helicopters. The President is personally overseeing all operations, ensuring a coordinated and effective response to this challenging situation.   Has the government identified the peak of this crisis? If so, how is the situation being managed now?   Regions across half the country have already been impacted by the flood crisis, or are expected to be affected within the next two to three weeks. The situation is expected to remain serious in the western and northern parts of the country, as well as in the far east, where snow-melt has just begun. We are not yet clear of the water – both metaphorically and literally. Fifteen percent of the country, and up to 40 percent in the northern regions, is still covered by snow. As a result, efforts to combat these natural challenges are ongoing. The national headquarters, under the leadership of the Prime Minister, is actively coordinating flood control measures and managing the aftermath of the flooding. The Prime Minister and their deputies, instructed by the President, are working directly in the regions most affected by the floods, ensuring that all necessary steps are taken. Overall, the state is maintaining control over the situation.   Can you tell us more about the nature of the assistance being provided?   Support is being provided to everyone affected by the floods and adequate compensation will be provided to these people. The government is ensuring that those impacted have access to all necessary resources, including the operation of temporary accommodation centers. Following the President’s instructions, the government has released state material reserve to aid residents. Additionally, significant assistance is coming from large businesses and citizens of Kazakhstan, exemplified by the collection of over 380 tons of...

Kazakhstan Struggles to Contain Floods; Worst Natural Disaster in 80 Years, President Says

Since last month, more than 75,000 people in Kazakhstan have been rescued from floods that the president has described as the country’s worst natural disaster in 80 years. Kyrgyzstan is sending aid to Kazakhstan, and Türkiye has said it is ready to help. Across the border from Kazakhstan, parts of Russia have also been hit by flooding caused by the melting of snow as spring approaches. A dam was breached in the Russian city of Orsk, forcing the evacuation of thousands. In Kazakhstan, some 18,000 children are among those rescued, and more than 69,000 farm animals have also been taken to safety, according to Kaharman Orazalin, a senior official in the Ministry of Emergency Situations. Several thousand private residential buildings, country houses and other buildings have been flooded, Orazalin said at a briefing on Sunday. He said that workers are trying to restore four destroyed bridges and 133 washed out sections of roads. Tents, bedding and water pumping equipment have been delivered. Sand bag barriers have been laid to block the floodwaters. “The Ministry of Emergency Situations calls on citizens to be extremely careful, strictly observe safety measures during the flood period, and not leave their homes and evacuation centers without the appropriate permission,” he said. “This is the largest natural disaster in the last 80 years,” President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev said on national television on Saturday. A state of emergency has been declared in ten regions of the country - Abay, Akmola, Aktobe, Atyrau, West Kazakhstan, Karaganda, Kostanay, Pavlodar, North Kazakhstan and Ulytau regions, according to Tokayev. Military forces are helping to alleviate the flooding; national and regional authorities are working around the clock and tens of thousands of volunteers are also helping, the president said. “We must draw appropriate conclusions from the catastrophic flood. That is, we need to correct the gaps and learn the appropriate lessons. And there are many such lessons,” Tokayev said. “Many issues need to be addressed, from the lack of disaster prevention work, the shortage of water management specialists, to the neglect of nature. The government and local executive bodies should effectively coordinate flood control. It is necessary to ensure legal order in flooded areas.” Orazalin, the official from the emergency situations ministry, said humanitarian aid from Kyrgyzstan was on the way. Türkiye is “deeply saddened” by the flooding in Kazakhstan and is “ready to provide any assistance needed to heal the wounds caused by the disaster,” the Turkish Foreign Ministry stated. Efforts to rescue individuals continue in the Kostanay region, where a state of emergency has been announced in six areas due to the rising waters of the Tobyl River, as reported by Asylbek Saduov, the deputy chief of the Kostanay Oblast Railway Station.

Japan to Assist Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan in Seismic Risk Detection

Synspective, a Japanese firm specializing in space monitoring and radar technology, has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Uzbekcosmos, the Center for Space Monitoring in Uzbekistan, and the Ғarysh Sapary National Company in Kazakhstan. Synspective is known for its advanced radar satellite interferometry data processing technologies, a key project being the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), which allows for the processing and interpretation of high-resolution radar images of the Earth's surface under any weather conditions or time of day. This technology enables the identification of displacement or deformation of the earth's surface and objects, aiding in forecasting risk zones for potential destruction, water-logging, or other emergencies caused by natural disasters. The MOU outlines plans for Synspective to work closely with the Center for Space Monitoring and GIS-technologies under Uzbekcosmos. The partnership aims to enhance Uzbekistan's remote sensing capabilities, promote scientific and innovative activities in the space industry, and actively involve the latest technologies. Given Uzbekistan's geographical location in an earthquake-prone zone, the partnership with Synspective is expected to contribute to the creation of sustainable infrastructure and the efficient and safe use of natural resources and energy in Central Asia. In Kazakhstan, Synspective will focus on developing innovative applications for Earth remote sensing and radar data, particularly in disaster management. This includes mitigating landslides, mudslides, floods, and effectively managing infrastructure to reduce the effects of climate change. The collaboration opens up opportunities for joint international commercial projects, allowing Synspective to leverage its satellite data and analytical solutions, while enabling Kazakhstan to expand its technological capabilities. Japan's extensive experience in monitoring deformation and seismic activity, as well as improving the safety of facilities in highly seismic areas makes this cooperation particularly relevant, especially given the recent searthquakes in the region.

Earthquake In Almaty: Residents Speak Of Panic And Damage

A magnitude seven earthquake shook Almaty last night, causing panic among local residents. However, some locals have said the situation was not as bad as it was portrayed on social media and in news reports. "They said it was a level seven magnitude earthquake, but my friend lives on the seventh floor and his furniture only wobbled, but nothing fell," Anastasia, a resident of the city told The Times of Central Asia. Despite the fact that numerous videos have appeared on the internet showing people in distress and buildings violently shaking, some have claimed that many of the videos are fakes, saying that the shaking was palpable, but did not reach levels that would cause widespread alarm. "The only thing that caused panic was a severe tremor in residential complexes that made the chandeliers wobble. My family and I drove into the city; traffic was crazy," Sanjar, a resident living on the outskirts of the city told The Times of Central Asia. Nevertheless, others spoke of feeling fear and anxiety during the earthquake, with another resident, Raushan telling The Times of Central Asia that  "“Just after midnight we felt swaying and tremors, which was especially frightening considering we live on the 12th floor. First, the bed started to shake, and then I noticed the chandelier swinging violently. We quickly ran out of the apartment taking our passports and wallets. The worst part was that we were left with no communication as we had forgotten our phones, so we couldn’t contact our loved ones."

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