• KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 2

Victory Day Comes in Central Asian Countries Without Much Pomp, but Plenty of Feeling

This year, as in previous years, the attitude toward Victory Day celebrations in Central Asian countries serves as an important political marker. The leaders of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan are scheduled to attend the Victory Day parade in Moscow on May 9. The leaders of Belarus, Cuba, Laos and Guinea-Bissau will also take part in the celebrations. The absences of the presidents of Uzbekistan, Armenia and Azerbaijan are particularly noticeable in that list. It's noteworthy that the Russian press is commenting on the different stances taken by the Central Asian countries in an extremely negative way -- deliberately agitating discord between Russia and the region. It's even been stated that Victory Day has been "canceled" in the region. Such are the broadcasts taking place against a backdrop of analysts' opinions: that in the coming decades, Central Asian countries won't be able to break the ties that bind them to their former Soviet master, as the economic dependence on Russia is only growing. This is especially true for Kazakhstan, as the lion's share of Kazakhstan's oil goes through Russian pipelines to Europe. In addition, a project increasing the transshipment of Russian hydrocarbons to China through Kazakhstan is in the works. However, contrary to the opinion of Russian tabloids, the Central Asian countries remain reverent and respectful of the cultural institution that is Victory Day. Most residents of the republics are proud of their fathers and grandfathers who fought on the fronts of World War II. In particular, for several years in a row, Kazakhstan has maintained a leading role in terms of doling out state budget payments to veterans of World War II. According to statistics, the size of a lump-sum social payment commemorating Victory Day in Kazakhstan, where 148 veterans live, averages $3,800. In Tajikistan there are 24 surviving veterans of World War II, and their payments amounted to $2,200-$2,300. Veterans in Uzbekistan received about $1,500, and in Belarus, Azerbaijan and Kyrgyzstan, about $1,100 apiece. Russia's 12,500 surviving veterans in Russia will receive the least -- the equivalent of only $107. To be sure, Kazakhstan has not held military parades in honor of the holiday for a year. That move is explained by the need to save money. This spring, unprecedented floods -- which affected almost half of the country -- have pushed President Kasym-Jomart Tokayev's administration to tend towards being thrifty and instead fund humanitarian aid and reconstruction. According to the Ministry of Defense of Kazakhstan, the parade requires spending about 4 billion tenge ($9 million) -- such a huge sum of money can be spent more impactfully on providing housing for the victims. Along with large-scale, WWII-related festive events in Kazakhstan, other important projects, such as international forums, have been canceled. Nevertheless, in his speech, President Tokayev not only congratulated veterans, but also emphasized the need to prepare for the 80th anniversary of the May 1945 victory, which is scheduled to be widely celebrated next year. In Uzbekistan, May 9 is considered a Day of Remembrance, but...

Central Asian Leaders Gather in Moscow for Economic Meeting, WWII Anniversary

At the invitation of Russian President Vladimir Putin, Central Asian leaders are arriving in Moscow ahead of celebrations on Thursday of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. President Shavkat Mirziyoyev of Uzbekistan arrived in the Russian capital “on a working visit” and will participate in commemorations of the 79th anniversary of victory over the Nazis, Russia’s state-run Tass news agency has reported. It said that Kyrgyz President Sadyr Japarov arrived in Moscow on Tuesday. The leaders of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan will also be in town, according to Russian presidential aide, Yuri Ushakov. Putin, who was inaugurated to a fifth term on Tuesday, was scheduled to attend a meeting of the Eurasian Economic Council, a regional trade group, on Wednesday. Also on the guest list were other leaders of member states of the group, including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Belarus and Armenia, the Kremlin said. Uzbekistan and Cuba were attending as observer states. Russia has looked to Central Asia to serve as a conduit for trade with as it seeks to circumvent Western sanctions imposed because of its invasion of Ukraine. Russia has said that only representatives from “friendly countries” were invited to the May 9 ceremony in Red Square, an opportunity for Putin to stir patriotic pride and showcase military might in the third year of war in Ukraine. Central Asian countries, as former Soviet republics, were critical to the Soviet war effort in World War II, and have been holding their own solemn commemorations in recent days. Whilst nurturing relations with China and the West, Central Asia countries retain close economic and security ties to Moscow.

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