• KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 7

Central Asia Needs $12 Billion to Secure Drinking Water

According to the new research paper “Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation in Central Asia” released by the Eurasian Development Bank (EDB), almost 10 million people, or 14% of the population, have poor access to safe drinking water in Central Asia. Water withdrawals for drinking and domestic use increased twofold to reach 8.6 km3 between 1994 and 2020. Investment in its supply infrastructure, however, failed to match growth in consumption. It is estimated that as much as 80% of the region’s water and sanitation equipment is no longer fit for purpose. In addition, physical and commercial water losses in distribution networks can be as high as 55%. The EDB research paper highlights a clear lack of  financial support for plans adopted by Central Asia to develop the sector, and forecasts a deficit of over $12 billion, or around $2 billion per year, between 2025-30. The largest shortfall is expected in Uzbekistan, estimated at $826 million per year, or almost $5 billion between 2025–30. A large shortfall is also projected for Kazakhstan at $700 million per year, or $4.2 billion from 2025–30. In Tajikistan, the shortfall will also be significant, given the size of the country’s economy, reaching $209 million per year, or more than $1.2 billion from 2025–30. To address the issue, the EDB paper outlines three solutions that could help Central Asian countries raise the required investment capital. First, the funding gap can be reduced by attracting finance from international financial institutions (IFIs), multilateral development banks, and development agencies. The water and sanitation sector in Central Asia currently accounts for only 6% of total IFI-approved sovereign funding provided to the region CA, with 147 projects valued at $4 billion (out of a total of $67.5 billion) completed from 2008–2023. Concerted efforts are required to improve the appeal of investment in the sector to attract more active involvement by IFIs. With the emergence of a new, favourable institutional environment and the arrival of private players, the potential of the corporate investment becomes significant. Secondly, to attract the much-needed finance from private investors and major players, the CA water and sanitation sector must not only  modify the ownership and governance structure, but also create conditions conducive to the effective development of market relations. Regarding the above, Evgeny Vinokurov, EDB Chief Economist, stated, “The strengthening of public-private partnership institutions can be of great help. With PPPs active in the water sector, state and private structures will be able to cooperate in a more productive fashion. Expansion of the water sector services market will boost competitiveness and improve the operating efficiency of individual companies. The presence of strong PPP institutions is likely to encourage private operators to join water sector projects. The advent of private players will help the CA countries to attract investments and gain access to innovations, technologies, and experience required to modernise the sector.” Thirdly, improving the tariff system is becoming increasingly compelling. Water tariffs in the region are extremely low and could therefore be raised to improve the financial sustainability...

Water Shortages in Kyrgyzstan’s Cities Despite Full Reservoirs

Due to a shortage, Kyrgyz authorities have banned the use of drinking water to irrigate cities' gardens and orchards. Implemented in Bishkek and Osh, the ban which operates during daytime hours, is set to run until the end of the summer. In a report to TCA,  Erlan Timurov, chief public relations specialist for Bishkekgorvodokanal, the company in charge of drinking water in Bishkek, stated: "Every year, Bishkekvodokanal produces about 145 million cubic meters of drinking water, around  48m cubic meters of which are lost as a result of  illegal connections to our networks and leaks caused by worn-out infrastructure" The situation is similar in southern Kyrgyzstan and in Osh, utility companies in the course of monitoring levels, regularly identify and cut off water supplies to those illegally  connected to the system. "The average daily consumption of drinking water in residential areas increases fivefold in summer," explained Timurov. "Most of this increase is spent on watering vegetable gardens and filling swimming pools. As a result, some residents experience water shortages." Ironically, the water deficit is developing against a backdrop of overflowing local reservoirs caused partly by abnormal weather melting mountain glaciers. Under the circumstances, the Tien Shan High Mountain Research Centre at the Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower in Kyrgyzstan blames cities' water shortages on irrational use. "In the 1980s , collective and state farms universally introduced the so-called sprinkler system. Back then,  500 to 1,000 cubic meters of water were required to irrigate one hectare.  Today, that has risen to  2 to 3 thousand cubic meters. The problem is that we have lost many technologies and do not know how to use water effectively," claimed  the scientific center. Drip irrigation used worldwide, is now being introduced in Kyrgyzstan. However, because  it's expensive, the percentage of Kyrgyz farmers using this type of irrigation is extremely small and the majority  continue their habit of using drinking water in their fields, gardens, and orchards using outdated irrigation systems .

By 2025, All of Kazakhstan Will Have Access to Clean Drinking Water

The Prime Minister of Kazakhstan, Olzhas Bektenov, has said at a government meeting where issues of water supply services to urban and rural settlements were addressed that the entire population will have access to clean drinking water within eighteen months. At the end of last year, access to water supply services in Kazakhstan's cities amounted to 98.9%, and in rural settlements, 96.6%. Full coverage of the urban population has been achieved in nine regions, with the lowest level of provision noted in the Abai and Pavlodar regions. To improve the situation in the regions with low indicators, funds are being allocated on a priority basis. Twenty-nine projects to construct and reconstruct pipelines in nine oblasts are being implemented, with plans to reconstruct and develop 2,000 kilometers of water pipelines, providing water supply to 437 settlements. A connection to a centralized water supply will be made in 44 of these, with a total population of 92,000 people. Five projects are under development and will be implemented after receiving state expertise; their implementation will improve the water supply in 200 settlements. In 2024, 218 billion tenge was bookmarked from the republican budget to fund the construction and reconstruction of water supply and sewage systems. The Prime Minister emphasized that by the end of 2025, 100% of the population must have access to quality drinking water. "This is one of the most socially important tasks. Only one-and-a-half-years are left for its fulfillment. Despite the high percentage of fulfillment, akimats (local authorities) should intensify work to achieve the plans to bring the relevant infrastructure to villages and towns. All works on the water supply should be prioritized. The implementation of water supply networks within settlements should be synchronized with the plans to bring the infrastructure of group water conduits to the borders of villages", said Bektenov.

Donor Coordination Committee Established for Kyrgyzstan’s Kambarata HPP-1 Project

The Kyrgyz Republic International Energy Investment Forum, held in Vienna, on June 10, concluded with the establishment of a Donor Coordination Committee for the construction of Kambarata HPP-1 hydropower plant in Kyrgyzstan. The Kyrgyz Cabinet of Ministers said that the doors are open to interested parties but to date, the committee comprises major international financial institutions and development partners, including the World Bank, the OPEC Fund, the Asian Development Bank, the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the Islamic Development Bank, and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. The Committee’s first meeting is scheduled for autumn this year. An inter-ministerial agreement on cooperation on the Kambarata HPP-1 project was also signed by the Ministries of Energy of the Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan. Summarizing the outcome of the forum, Chairman of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic Akylbek Japarov announced: “We have made significant progress in establishing contacts and a common understanding of further actions. I am confident that the created Donor Coordination Committee will be a continuation of actions to implement the national project — the construction of Kambarata HPP-1.” Japarov told forum participants that “According to experts, by 2050 the population in Central Asia will increase by 27%, the demand for food by 35%, and the consumption of drinking water by 50%. At the same time, water is the main artery of life in the countries of the Central Asian region. Countries located at the sources of large rivers account for 80.7% of the region’s total water flow.” Regarding different countries’ priorities for water usage - downstream Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan use water in irrigation mode in summer, and upstream Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, in energy mode in winter -he warned “This situation affects the energy and food security in the region.” He then provided a more detailed report on the Kambarata HPP-1 project: “Kambarata HPP-1 is located at the source of the glaciers. Effective operation of this power plant will allow the accumulation and rational use of water resources of the Toktogul reservoir. The Kambarata HPP-1 construction project has broad economic, environmental, and social benefits and prospects for both Kyrgyzstan and the Central Asian region. The project will provide the Kyrgyz Republic and Central Asia with clean energy at the lowest cost, which entails lower costs of the energy transition in the region. Electricity generation at hydroelectric power plants will reduce emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere.” Reiterating the project’s key importance in meeting the growing demand for energy and increasing energy security in the region, Japarov continued: “The power plant will be sited in the upper reaches of the Naryn River. Its installed capacity will be 1,860 megawatts with an average annual generation of 5.6 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity. The preliminary construction estimate is more than $4 billion. The master plan of Kambarata HPP-1 includes a rock-fill dam, a hydroelectric power plant building with four hydraulic units, construction and operational spillways and transport tunnels, a residential village [for personnel], a reservoir and water treatment facilities.” He confirmed...

Water Crisis in Uzbekistan: an interview with Eco-journalist Nargis Kosimova

For a long time now, there have been murmurs about the growing problem of water shortages in Uzbekistan. Every citizen is likely to remember, at the very least, public service announcements on television with calls to conserve water. Still, the issue began to really attract people’s attention after the last, rather unexpected hike in cold tariffs. Was this an indication of the situation deteriorating? What is going on with water resources, and what should we expect moving forward? To find out, we talked to Nargis Kosimova, an eco-journalist, teacher, media trainer, and doctor of philology, who has come to fame as the author of Ekolog.uz. What is the current situation with drinking water in Uzbekistan? The problem with water resources is particularly serious in Uzbekistan, now. Experts say that by 2030, the water deficit could reach 7 billion cubic meters, and this could double by 2050. Unfortunately, the climate is changing at a rapid pace. Our key rivers, the Amu Darya and the Syr Darya have seen their discharge decline 20% in just 50 years. Currently, we are also seeing dust storms and droughts, which are exacerbating the problem of water scarcity. The result may be a rise in the cost of fresh water and, consequently, food prices, with the entire economy of the country affected in turn. For example, over the past 15 years, the amount of water used per person in Uzbekistan has roughly halved from 3,000 cubic meters in 2008 to 1,500 cubic meters by the end of 2022. Nevertheless, water consumption per capita is still very high. for example, in Germany each person uses just 312 cubic meters of water each year, meaning that even though they have plentiful resources, Germans conserve a lot of water. Last year, we conducted a training session which was attended by 60 farmers. Unfortunately, not one of them, as they told us, had switched to water-saving technologies. when asked why not, they gave a wide range of answers, from a lack of money to the phrase, “Why [should we] if there is still water?” What measures can be taken to help avoid a water crisis? Many experts highlight drip irrigation as an effective way to rationally utilize resources. Even the Ministry of Water Resources noted that switching to this system would significantly reduce the stress on the country’s reserves. and at the same time, yields would increase significantly. Increasing prices on drinking water can also help avoid a crisis situation, while control over water usage should also be strengthened. A 100% transition to water-saving technologies in agriculture is needed, as well as protecting rivers from erosion. In Uzbekistan, starting on May 1st, an indefinite moratorium on the extraction of ore from the beds of large rivers will come into effect. Increasing construction and urbanization have led to almost uncontrolled extraction of sand and gravel, as a result of which riverbeds have been nearly degraded and the water has practically disappeared from these rivers. Moreover, it is not just water that...

Potential Water Crisis in Uzbekistan: An Interview with Eco-journalist Nargis Kosimova

For a long time now, there have been murmurs about the growing problem of water shortages in Uzbekistan. Every citizen is likely to remember, at the very least, public service announcements on television with calls to conserve water. Still, the issue began to really attract people’s attention after the last, rather unexpected hike in cold tariffs. Was this an indication of the situation deteriorating? What is going on with water resources, and what should we expect moving forward? To find out, we talked to Nargis Kosimova, an eco-journalist, teacher, media trainer, and doctor of philology, who has come to fame as the author of Ekolog.uz. What is the current situation with drinking water in Uzbekistan? The problem with water resources is particularly serious in Uzbekistan, now. Experts say that by 2030, the water deficit could reach 7 billion cubic meters, and this could double by 2050. Unfortunately, the climate is changing at a rapid pace. Our key rivers, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya, have seen their discharge decline 20% in just 50 years. Currently, we are also seeing dust storms and droughts, which are exacerbating the problem of water scarcity. The result may be a rise in the cost of fresh water and, consequently, food prices, with the entire economy of the country affected in turn. For example, over the past 15 years, the amount of water used per person in Uzbekistan has roughly halved from 3,000 cubic meters in 2008 to 1,500 cubic meters by the end of 2022. Nevertheless, water consumption per capita is still very high. For example, in Germany each person uses just 312 cubic meters of water each year, meaning that even though they have plentiful resources, Germans conserve a lot of water. Last year, we conducted a training session which was attended by 60 farmers. Unfortunately, not one of them, as they told us, had switched to water-saving technologies. When asked why not, they gave a wide range of answers, from a lack of money to the phrase, “why [should we] if there is still water?” What measures can be taken to help avoid a water crisis? Many experts highlight drip irrigation as an effective way to rationally utilize resources. Even the Ministry of Water Resources noted that switching to this system would significantly reduce the stress on the country’s reserves. And at the same time, yields would increase significantly. Increasing prices on drinking water can also help avoid a crisis situation, while control over water usage should also be strengthened. A 100% transition to water-saving technologies in agriculture is needed, as well as protecting rivers from erosion. In Uzbekistan, starting on May 1st, an indefinite moratorium on the extraction of ore from the beds of large rivers will come into effect. Increasing construction and urbanization has led to almost uncontrolled extraction of sand and gravel, as a result of which riverbeds have been nearly degraded and the water has practically disappeared from these rivers. Moreover, it is not just water that has...