• KGS/USD = 0.01118 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09131 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01118 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09131 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 4

Water Crisis in Uzbekistan: an interview with Eco-journalist Nargis Kosimova

For a long time now, there have been murmurs about the growing problem of water shortages in Uzbekistan. Every citizen is likely to remember, at the very least, public service announcements on television with calls to conserve water. Still, the issue began to really attract people’s attention after the last, rather unexpected hike in cold tariffs. Was this an indication of the situation deteriorating? What is going on with water resources, and what should we expect moving forward? To find out, we talked to Nargis Kosimova, an eco-journalist, teacher, media trainer, and doctor of philology, who has come to fame as the author of Ekolog.uz. What is the current situation with drinking water in Uzbekistan? The problem with water resources is particularly serious in Uzbekistan, now. Experts say that by 2030, the water deficit could reach 7 billion cubic meters, and this could double by 2050. Unfortunately, the climate is changing at a rapid pace. Our key rivers, the Amu Darya and the Syr Darya have seen their discharge decline 20% in just 50 years. Currently, we are also seeing dust storms and droughts, which are exacerbating the problem of water scarcity. The result may be a rise in the cost of fresh water and, consequently, food prices, with the entire economy of the country affected in turn. For example, over the past 15 years, the amount of water used per person in Uzbekistan has roughly halved from 3,000 cubic meters in 2008 to 1,500 cubic meters by the end of 2022. Nevertheless, water consumption per capita is still very high. for example, in Germany each person uses just 312 cubic meters of water each year, meaning that even though they have plentiful resources, Germans conserve a lot of water. Last year, we conducted a training session which was attended by 60 farmers. Unfortunately, not one of them, as they told us, had switched to water-saving technologies. when asked why not, they gave a wide range of answers, from a lack of money to the phrase, “Why [should we] if there is still water?” What measures can be taken to help avoid a water crisis? Many experts highlight drip irrigation as an effective way to rationally utilize resources. Even the Ministry of Water Resources noted that switching to this system would significantly reduce the stress on the country’s reserves. and at the same time, yields would increase significantly. Increasing prices on drinking water can also help avoid a crisis situation, while control over water usage should also be strengthened. A 100% transition to water-saving technologies in agriculture is needed, as well as protecting rivers from erosion. In Uzbekistan, starting on May 1st, an indefinite moratorium on the extraction of ore from the beds of large rivers will come into effect. Increasing construction and urbanization have led to almost uncontrolled extraction of sand and gravel, as a result of which riverbeds have been nearly degraded and the water has practically disappeared from these rivers. Moreover, it is not just water that...

Potential Water Crisis in Uzbekistan: An Interview with Eco-journalist Nargis Kosimova

For a long time now, there have been murmurs about the growing problem of water shortages in Uzbekistan. Every citizen is likely to remember, at the very least, public service announcements on television with calls to conserve water. Still, the issue began to really attract people’s attention after the last, rather unexpected hike in cold tariffs. Was this an indication of the situation deteriorating? What is going on with water resources, and what should we expect moving forward? To find out, we talked to Nargis Kosimova, an eco-journalist, teacher, media trainer, and doctor of philology, who has come to fame as the author of Ekolog.uz. What is the current situation with drinking water in Uzbekistan? The problem with water resources is particularly serious in Uzbekistan, now. Experts say that by 2030, the water deficit could reach 7 billion cubic meters, and this could double by 2050. Unfortunately, the climate is changing at a rapid pace. Our key rivers, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya, have seen their discharge decline 20% in just 50 years. Currently, we are also seeing dust storms and droughts, which are exacerbating the problem of water scarcity. The result may be a rise in the cost of fresh water and, consequently, food prices, with the entire economy of the country affected in turn. For example, over the past 15 years, the amount of water used per person in Uzbekistan has roughly halved from 3,000 cubic meters in 2008 to 1,500 cubic meters by the end of 2022. Nevertheless, water consumption per capita is still very high. For example, in Germany each person uses just 312 cubic meters of water each year, meaning that even though they have plentiful resources, Germans conserve a lot of water. Last year, we conducted a training session which was attended by 60 farmers. Unfortunately, not one of them, as they told us, had switched to water-saving technologies. When asked why not, they gave a wide range of answers, from a lack of money to the phrase, “why [should we] if there is still water?” What measures can be taken to help avoid a water crisis? Many experts highlight drip irrigation as an effective way to rationally utilize resources. Even the Ministry of Water Resources noted that switching to this system would significantly reduce the stress on the country’s reserves. And at the same time, yields would increase significantly. Increasing prices on drinking water can also help avoid a crisis situation, while control over water usage should also be strengthened. A 100% transition to water-saving technologies in agriculture is needed, as well as protecting rivers from erosion. In Uzbekistan, starting on May 1st, an indefinite moratorium on the extraction of ore from the beds of large rivers will come into effect. Increasing construction and urbanization has led to almost uncontrolled extraction of sand and gravel, as a result of which riverbeds have been nearly degraded and the water has practically disappeared from these rivers. Moreover, it is not just water that has...

Uzbekistan to Improve Efficiency of Water Use in Agriculture

At a government meeting on January 4th, President of Uzbekistan, Shavkat Mirziyoyev listened to proposals aimed at improving the efficiency of water use in agriculture. At the meeting it was stated that in the current condition of an increasingly worsening shortage of water resources, special attention needs to be paid to its rational use. In recent years, 472,000 hectares has been converted to using drip irrigation, 48,000 to sprinkler irrigation, and water-saving technologies have been introduced on 97,000 hectares. As a result of these measures, two billion cubic meters of water were saved in 2023 alone, which is equal to the annual consumption of the Bukhara region. Starting this year, the payment for one cubic meter of water supplied to the field has been set at U$0.008, as the time has come to change the idea that has been established in the minds of many people that water is free, officials said at the meeting. In this regard, it was proposed to organize settlements with water consumers on a differentiated basis. In particular, from 2025 it is planned that a lower tax coefficient be applied to farmers who have installed water meters and introduced water-saving technologies, and a higher rate be applied to those who have failed to do so. The meeting also discussed measures to further stimulate the introduction of water-saving technologies, including opening a preferential credit line under which loans will be issued at a rate of 14% for a period of five years with a two-year grace period. Mirziyoyev approved this proposal, and gave instructions for the scope of water conservation work to be expanded.

Kazakhstan Now Chairs International Fund for Saving Aral Sea

From 2024, the chairmanship of the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea (IFAS) has passed to Kazakhstan, after President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev was elected as head of IFAS until the end of 2026, the Kazakh Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation said. The International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea, which includes Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, is engaged in the implementation of joint interstate environmental, scientific and practical programs and projects aimed at saving the Aral Sea and improving the environmental situation in the region, as well as solving common social and environmental problems.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="12017" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]“We are aiming to deepen cooperation both with the states of Central Asia and other international organizations and financial institutions,” said the Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation of Kazakhstan, Nurzhan Nurzhigitov. “This year we plan to begin the second phase of the project to preserve the Northern Aral Sea, implemented together with the World Bank. Saving the Aral Sea is a task that can only be accomplished through the joint efforts of all IFAS founding states. In the next three years, we intend to achieve significant results in this direction.” Speaking in September 2023 in Dushanbe at a meeting of the Council of Heads of State–Founders of the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea, Tokayev said that IFAS has become the most important institution facilitating regional cooperation on issues of transboundary water resources sharing, as well as solving environmental and socio-economic problems in the Aral Sea basin. Tokayev also emphasized the need to create a mechanism for long-term and sustainable cooperation for the effective use of water and energy resources in Central Asia, taking into account the interests of all countries in the region. To ensure transparency of water use in the region and strengthen the dialogue and friendship between Central Asian nations, Tokayev proposed the development of a work plan which would introduce a unified automated system of accounting, monitoring, management and distribution of water resources in the Aral Sea basin. Tokayev also called on Kyrgyzstan to resume its full participation in IFAS.

Start typing to see posts you are looking for.