• KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09310 0.43%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 6

Kazakhstan Postpones Games of the Future

To channel funds into eliminating the consequences of unprecedented spring flooding in Kazakhstan, President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev has issued an order to halt costly image-building and other major events. The decision announced by the Kazakh Ministry of Tourism and Sport on 26 April, will directly impact the Games of the Future, a phygital sports show in which competitors challenge each other in physical and digital dimensions. Following his attendance at the first ever Games in the city of Kazan, Russia, in February this year, President Tokayev announced that Kazakhstan would host the next round in 2025. The event has now been postponed until 2026. Kazakhstan also plans to optimize the cost of organizing the 5th World Nomad Games to be held in Astana from 8 -14 September.

EU Provides Humanitarian Aid to Victims of Kazakhstan Floods

In response to the extensive spring floods that to date, have displaced more than 119,000 people across Kazakhstan, the European Union has pledged €200,000 in humanitarian aid to assist the worst affected families. As reported by the Delegation of the European Union to Kazakhstan, funds allocated by the EU will be channelled through the Red Crescent Society of Kazakhstan to provide essential aid in the form of household items such as mattresses and bed linen, multi-purpose cash, as well as measures and materials related to hygiene. The humanitarian aid, to be provided over the next three months, will directly benefit 5,000 individuals seriously affected by the floods, particularly female-headed households, households with disabled or elderly family members, and families with more than three children.

A Third Of Kazakhstan’s Flood-Protection Structures Are Damaged

More than 500 hydraulic structures in Kazakhstan intended to hold back water during floods need to be repaired, according to a report from the country's Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation. Specialists from the ministry, together with akimats (local administrations), counted 1,502 hydraulic structures in the country, of which 537 are damaged. According to the department, the hydraulic structures will be repaired as funds are received from the national budget. The survey comes amid Kazakhstan's battle with historic spring flooding, which has set in motion a frantic grind of evacuations, pumping water and shoring up dams. While the threat remains, water levels are declining in some areas and the country is working to help disaster victims over the long term. Some 22,700 people who fled their homes to escape floodwaters have returned, and the flood situation has stabilized in some hard-hit places such as the Aktobe region, according to the government. Still, thousands of residents -- many of them children -- remain in evacuation centers, whilst others are in temporary housing. More than 100,000 people have been evacuated over the course of the crisis, which began in March as snow melted quickly in the warmer weather.  

Uzbekistan Sends Humanitarian Aid to Kazakhs Affected by Floods

The people of Uzbekistan plan to send humanitarian aid to the people of Kazakhstan affected by the spring floods, according to a report by news outlet 24.KZ. The initiative was proposed by a group including a local blogger, activists and Kazakhs living in Uzbekistan. Residents of Upper Chirchik, Tashkent region, sent hundreds of liters of vegetable oil and bedding. There are also people bringing inflatable boats, rubber boots and personal hygiene items to the collection center. Uzbeks also organized fundraising, with the amount of funds raised reaching 60 million sum (~$4,700). According to 24.KZ, the volunteers planned to send humanitarian aid to Kazakhstan on April 19 to a village affected by the flood in the Kostanay region. Humanitarian aid has been sent to the people affected by the floods in Kazakhstan. Fifteen large trucks will deliver food, clothes, blankets, blankets, pillows, hygiene products, special equipment tents, rubber boat kits and other essential items.

No Lessons Being Learned From Kazakh Floods, Says Political Analyst

Kazakhstan has been prone to flooding before, but the 2024 Kazakh floods have added a catastrophic page to the chronicles. Political analyst Marat Shibutov tells The Times of Central Asia that only extremely tough measures can motivate ministers and akims (local government executive) to actually work on flood prevention.   The Floods Have Not Yet Peaked Areas and homes in many regions of Kazakhstan -- Atyrau, West Kazakhstan, Aktobe, Akmola, Kostanay, East Kazakhstan, North Kazakhstan and Pavlodar -- remain flooded. According to the Ministry of Emergency Situations, more than 113,000 people have been evacuated from the various disaster zones. The threat of another destructive wave of surface water still remains for major cities, even high-rise buildings are battling high in water in Atyrau, Petropavlovsk and Kostanay. Kazakh president Kasym-Jomart Tokayev has already visited the affected regions several times. According to local reports, people are now concerned not with punishing those responsible, but with paying fair compensation for lost housing, farms and livestock, and, most importantly, with creating an effective flood control system. In particular, residents of dacha (detached suburban) houses in Uralsk blocked the highway, demanding that the akim of the city include them in the list of those to be paid. If more floods occur it will be impossible to live in flood-prone areas. The only alternative is a radical revision of the requirements for residential zoning protective measures. Tokayev spoke about the responsibility for breached and unfinished dams and dikes, as well as the overlooked forecasts made by meteorologists about increased snowmelt and the threat of flooding not only from rivers, but also from the steppes in late March. For the lack of timely flood control measures, he announced a harsh reprimand to First Deputy Prime Minister Roman Sklyar and Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Nurzhan Nurzhigitov. Local administrators weren't spared either, with harsh reprimands and warnings for incomplete official compliance to the akims of Aktobe, Kostanay and West Kazakhstan regions -- and a harsh reprimand to the akims of Atyrau, Akmola, Almaty, Pavlodar and Abay regions. According to official data from the Ministry of Emergency Situations, in 2024 to date seven billion tenge ($15.5 million) have been allocated just to local executive bodies for flood mitigation activities. In March 2024, 66 billion tenge ($147 million) was allocated to carry out work relating to combating emergency situations. From 2019 to 2023, the Emergency Situations Ministry's expenditures increased almost fourfold, to 264 billion tenge ($588 million). Over the past five years, over 762 billion tenge ($1.7 billion) has been allocated from the national budget. What exactly those funds were towards remains an open question -- possibly as part of ongoing criminal cases.   Disasters of the Past It's not the first time that high water has caused irreparable damage in Kazakhstan. In Uralsk they still talk about a serious flood in 1942. In early May, the water level in the Urals reached 943 centimeters, and a 9-point storm raged on the river. Over 500 families were evacuated from...

Kyrgyzstan Delivers Humanitarian Aid to Flood-Affected Kazakhstan

In response to the devastation caused by Kazakhstan’s unprecedented floods, on April 4, Chairman of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic, Akylbek Japarov, announced that Kyrgyzstan would reach out a helping hand to its neighbour. A convoy of 15 trucks carrying 300 tons of humanitarian aid from Kyrgyzstan duly arrived in the city of Aktobe in Kazakhstan on 8 April. Emergency supplies include sunflower oil, sugar, rice, pasta, confectionery, as well as locally-produced mattresses and tents. As reported by the Kyrgyz Ministry of Emergency Situations, aid will be distributed amongst the four regions of Kazakhstan worst hit by unprecedented spring floods. Three trucks are headed the Kostanay region, 4 to the Aktobe region, 4 to the Ural region, and 4 to the Atyrau region. In a statement, Japarov recalled that following the explosion at the Bishkek thermal power plant on 2 February, which left the city without hot water and heating for several days, President of Kazakhstan Kassym-Jomart Tokayev sent 2,000 tons of diesel fuel. Expressing his gratitude for the help offered by Kazakhstan, he explained, “we will also send them humanitarian aid, even if they did not ask.”

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