• KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 9

Inspection of TPP in Tashkent Region Reveals Harmful Emissions

The Ecology Department of the Tashkent Region has inspected the Novo-Angren thermal power plant (TPP) and found violations related to the emission of harmful substances and the insufficient efficiency of dust and gas cleaning equipment. It was discovered that emissions exceeded the established norms, and the efficiency of the equipment had decreased by 80%. These violations resulted in significant air pollution. In addition, the dumping of industrial waste in unsanctioned places was identified. In total, over a billion som ($80,000) of damage was caused. To prevent further atmospheric pollution, a plan of urgent measures was developed to improve the efficiency of dust and gas cleaning equipment. In addition, with regard to 11 officials from TPP, relevant documents were sent to law enforcement authorities to take any necessary legal measures.

Uzbekistan’s “Plant 100 Saplings” Initiative: A Green Response to Illegal Tree-Felling

In a bid to counter the alarming rate of illegal tree-felling, the president of Uzbekistan, Shavkat Mirziyoyev, has given the green light to an innovative ecological program. Launched by the Ministry of Ecology, Environmental Protection and Climate Change on January 29th, the initiative involves planting 100 saplings for every tree unlawfully cut down. This move comes as air pollution in Tashkent has reached alarming levels, with PM2.5 pollution recently surpassing the World Health Organization's recommended limit by 23.2 times. Tashkent regularly features as one of the worst cities globally for air pollution due to factors like increasing emissions from coal-burning heat, power plants and motor vehicles, unauthorized construction, and illegal tree-felling.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="14150" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Approximately 2,427 instances of illegal tree-felling were recorded in the first nine months of 2023 alone - including 714 bushels of precious trees - contributing to the shrinking of wildlife reproduction areas and natural reserves. The situation is particularly dire in the country's “Red Book” areas, which are home to endangered flora and fauna. One significant casualty has been the Tajik kavragi, a naturally occurring medicinal plant. Between July and September, 11,550 bushes were illegally harvested in the Surkhandarya Region’s Bobotog State Forestry, resulting in environmental damage totaling 5.7 billion som ($462,000). At the January 29th meeting it was announced that 22,000 new industrial enterprises have been launched in the country since 2020, and industry and transport together now emit more than two million tons of pollutants into the atmosphere a year. In many cases, construction projects are implemented without environmental assessment. To reverse this trend, the government is planning substantial green efforts over the next five years. These include creating at least 3,000 hectares of green belt and 200 hectares of “green parks” encircling the city of Tashkent and its surrounding districts. Additionally, "green gardens" will be established on former garbage landfills, covering 23 hectares in Ohangaron and 37 hectares in Yangiyol in the Tashkent region.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="14168" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]As part of this ambitious project, the Ministry of Ecology, Environmental Protection and Climate Change has created a digital map, pinpointing the coordinates of more than 254 million trees. Each tree in the city of Tashkent will be registered and given a 'passport' on the Green Space electronic platform. This will reflect crucial information, such as the tree's type, age, height, condition, and location. Trees older than five years covering all regions and districts of Uzbekistan were accounted for during the survey. This comprehensive registration process was made possible through the use of satellite imagery, remote sensing, geo-information systems, and artificial intelligence technologies. The initiative also drew on the experiences of several countries, including the U.S., Canada, China, India, Australia, Russia, and Germany. Uzbekistan's "Plant 100 Saplings" initiative marks a significant step towards environmental conservation. By leveraging technology and international experiences, the country is taking steps to protect its flora and fauna, demonstrating a commitment to sustainable development and environmental stewardship.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="14148" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Other measures currently...

“Close Your Windows, Avoid Outdoor Exercise” – Residents Fear Air Pollution in Tashkent

On the afternoon of January 27th local time, the level of PM2.5 (fine particles) pollution in the air in Tashkent surpassed the level recommended by the World Health Organization by 23.2 times, according to data from the U.S. Embassy Tashkent AirNow monitoring station. This ranked Uzbekistan’s capital as the third worst city in the world for air pollution, leading to warnings to “avoid outdoor exercise, close your windows, wear a mask outdoors, and run an air purifier.” Thirty-times thinner than a human hair, PM2.5 particles are widely regarded as the most harmful to health.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="14067" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Tashkent has been grappling with a serious air pollution crisis for years, and has been consistently ranked among the cities with the highest levels of air pollution worldwide. Several factors contribute to the escalating levels of air pollution in Tashkent. The Ministry of Ecology, Environmental Protection and Climate Change of Uzbekistan has highlighted increasing emissions from coal-burning heat and power plants, motor vehicles, illegal tree felling, and unauthorized construction activities as the key contributors. The number of vehicles in Tashkent has also increased by 32% from 3.14 million in 2021 to 4.6 million in 2023. The majority of these vehicles use A-80 gasoline, a fuel type that does not meet international standards and emits a significant number of pollutants. Moreover, coal usage for electricity generation has also increased, rising from 3.9 million tons in 2019 to 6.7 million tons by the end of 2023, whilst Tashkent's geographical location, surrounded by mountains, exacerbates the problem as it prevents the polluted air from being dispersed by wind.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="14068" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]In response to this environmental crisis, earlier this month the Ministry proposed several measures including banning motor fuel below the Euro-4 standard, restricting the movement of heavy cargo vehicles during rush hours, banning vehicles manufactured before 2010, promoting electric vehicles, reducing congestion by implementing an odd-even scheme for vehicle movement, pedestrianizing city centers, transitioning public transport to electric and gas-cylinder fuel, imposing a moratorium on construction except for facilities of social and state significance, banning the use of coal for industrial purposes in the Tashkent region, and creating a “green belt” around the city.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13668" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]Despite these proposed measures, with such commitments having been made previously, many remain unconvinced about the government's commitment to combating air pollution. "It is now safer to live in Chernobyl than in Tashkent,” Journalist Nikita Makarenko wrote on Telegram. “Where are the measures to reduce cars? Where are the paid parking lots; where are the measures to raise the price of owning a car? Where is the public transport?" Earlier this month, activists in the capital staged a protest to voice their concerns, complaining that the city feels like it is covered in a constant layer of fog which “smells like smoke” and fearing that the government’s response may prove to be a “one-off,” when a long-term strategy is desperately needed. Tashkent is not alone in the region –...

Rain in Tashkent Reduced Air Pollution by Three Times

In the morning on the 25th of January in Tashkent, the level of air pollution by PM2.5 particles was 21 times higher than the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended limit, reaching 104.8 µg/m3. However, after the start of rain in the afternoon, there was a significant improvement in air quality, moving it from the "harmful" to the "medium" category, and the PM2.5 indicator decreased to less than 30 µg/m3. Rain helps improve air quality for several reasons. First, it helps clean particles and pollutants from the atmosphere by depositing them on the earth's surface through the process of atmospheric deposition, where rain drops capture particles and carry them to the ground. Rain also dilutes pollutants in the atmosphere, which reduces their concentration. It can also chemically interact with some pollutants, helping to remove them from the air.

Ministry Looks to Tackle Air Pollution in Tashkent Amid Flash Mob Protest

Uzbekistan’s capital, Tashkent, has long been ranked among the worst cities in the world with the highest levels of air pollution by the international service, IQAir. In 2022, the portal ranked Tashkent as the worst in the world in terms of air pollution based on data from Uzhydromet (State Hydrometeorological Service). Tashkent is particularly prone to fine particles of PM-2.5, which is the most dangerous indicator for health, according to the World Health Organization. On January 12th, the Ministry of Ecology, Environmental Protection and Climate Change of Uzbekistan stated that increasing levels of air pollution in Tashkent are caused by emissions from coal-burning heat and power plants, and from motor vehicles. The levels of air pollution are also due to the illegal felling of 49,000 trees and construction work being carried out without planning permission. Another contributing factor is an increase in the amount of pollutants being emitted by vehicles, the number of which is growing rapidly. In 2021, there were 3.14 million cars, but by 2023 there were 4.6 million, an increase of 32%. On average, 730,000 vehicles are on the move in Tashkent every day, with between 160,000 to 300,000 entering the capital from the regions. Cars using A-80 gasoline, which does not meet international standards, emit more harmful substances into the atmosphere. The burning of coal to generate electricity is also on the rise. In 2019, 3.9 million tons of coal were used; by 2022, this had increased to 5.3 million tons, and by the end of 2023 it was 6.7 million tons, the ministry stated. The levels of air pollution are also due to the fact that Tashkent is located is surrounded by mountains, meaning the wind cannot circulate, and the polluted air is not blown away. In order to reduce air pollution in Tashkent, the ministry proposed the following measures: – a ban on motor fuel below the Euro-4 standard (AI-80 gasoline); – a restriction on the movement of cargo vehicles in Tashkent weighing more than 3.5- and 12-tons during rush hour (from 07:00 to 10:00 and from 17:00 to 20:00); – a ban on vehicles manufactured before 2010; - providing preferential treatment and subsidies to owners of electric vehicles; – a scheme to reduce congestion wherein vehicles with odd number plates are allowed to drive on odd days, and those with even numbers on even days; – pedestrianized zones in the center of the city; – the transfer of public transport to the use of electric and gas-cylinder fuel; – a moratorium on construction except for facilities of social and state significance; – a ban in the Tashkent region on the use of coal for industrial purposes; – the creation of a “green belt” around the city. Meanwhile, on the same day, activists in Tashkent staged a flash mob to protest about the state of affairs. Among those fighting for the right to life and health were eco-blogger, Mutabar Khushvaktova (Urikguli), the singer, Konsta, stand-up comedian, Mirshakar Faizullaev, bloggers Umid Gafurov and Mirzayor Erkinov,...

Mass Die-Out of Swans in Mangystau: What are the Causes?

On December 27th, inspectors discovered a tragic picture on the shores of Lake Karakol in the Ustyurt State Nature Reserve, with the lifeless bodies of thirty swans lying on the ground. The Department of Ecology, which analyzed water from the lake, reported that at the time of sampling the maximum permissible concentration of harmful substances had been exceeded. However, the true extent of the situation has since become clearer, and according to updated information 826 dead swans have been recorded in Mangystau, with this figure continuing to rise daily. In the process of monitoring water sources associated with Lake Karakol, having found that permissible pollution levels had been exceeded, an unscheduled inspection of the Rixos Aktau hotel took place. This information was provided by Nurken Sharbiev, Deputy Minister of Ecology and Natural Resources of the Republic of Kazakhstan, and Zhomart Aliyev, head of the Committee for Environmental Regulation and Control of the Ministry. Rixos currently operates 34 hotels and resorts, the majority of which are located in Turkey, Kazakhstan, the UAE and Egypt, and seven of which were developed in partnership with the infamous Bayrock Group.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13641" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]The Rixos Water World Aktau Hotel is located on the coast of the Caspian Sea, 20 kilometers from the city of Aktau, whilst the protected territory of Lake Karakol is located within the boundaries of the Karagi-Karakol Zoological Reserve, which has republican significance. More than 20 species of birds listed in the Red Book of Kazakhstan and the international list of protected species inhabit this land, including the dalmatian pelican, pink flamingos, and the Savka. At this juncture, the extent of the involvement of Rixos Aktau is yet to be revealed, though the Department of Ecology of Mangystau is probing the hotel’s discharge into the lake. Specialists are currently analyzing samples, and if the results show contaminants the hotel may be fined up to an amount which would depend on the volume and composition of the discharged wastewater.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="13640" img_size="full" el_class="scond-image" parallax_scroll="no" woodmart_inline="no"][vc_column_text woodmart_inline="no" text_larger="no"]However, a representative of the public commission tasked with investigating the cause of the mass die-out, Adilbek Kozybakov, posted a different supposition about the reason for the death of the birds on Facebook. "The cause of death is avian influenza, as confirmed by laboratory tests. Viruses of some forms of bird flu can be dangerous to both humans and poultry, but for some reason they still have not declared a quarantine and closed Lake Karakol to visitors. Due to the wide resonance around this topic, different groups of journalists, bloggers, activists and ordinary citizens passing by the lake come to Karakol every day. They walk along the shore, stepping on bird droppings, and can then carry the bird flu virus home," Kozybakov wrote. Kozybakov has suggested that experts from various fields - veterinarians and ornithologists, virologists and bacteriologists, specialists in epizootiology and epidemiology, and local independent biologists and ecologists - should form a commission. "Only through such a body will it be possible to...

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