• KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 319

Islamic Development Bank Supports Rogun HPP Project in Tajikistan

News agency Khovar has reported on the Islamic Development Bank (IDB) support in the construction of the Rogun Hydropower Plant (HPP) in Tajikistan. Dr. Muhammad Suleiman Al-Jasser, President of the IDB Group, announced this after a meeting with Tajik President, Emomali Rahmon. The meeting detailed Tajikistan's history towards economic development and outlined the country's priorities for the future. "The Islamic Development Bank has cooperated closely and successfully with Tajikistan for many years. Financing under this agreement has amounted to more than $900 million. We are satisfied with the current level of cooperation. One of the projects under consideration today is support for the Rogun Hydroelectric Power Plant project. The Islamic Development Bank has decided to sign an agreement with the Government of the Republic of Tajikistan,” Muhammad Suleiman Al-Jasser stated. Al-Jasser noted that IDB funds allocated to Tajikistan are directed to energy, education, industry, agriculture, transportation, and other key economic sectors. “We are confident that the current cooperation will be expanded and will serve as an invitation to other participants and investors,” Al-Jasser concluded.

First NPP Reactor in Uzbekistan May Start Before 2033

Spot.uz reports that the first reactor of the Small Nuclear Power Plant is planned to be operational in five years. The project will be built near Tuzkon Lake, Farish District, Jizzakh Region. The cost has yet to be disclosed. “The cost of the low-power nuclear power plant construction project based on six RITM-200N reactor units with an installed capacity of 330 MW is confidential information and will not be disclosed,” Uzatom told Spot.uz. The small nuclear power plant's first reactor will be commissioned 60 months after the completion of priority works, which should begin this summer. Each subsequent reactor will be commissioned within six months. The full commissioning will occur before 2033. “During the construction of a low-power nuclear power plant, local general industrial equipment, products, and components are used by the specifications specified in the project documents. Considering the long service life of the small nuclear power plant, it is necessary to use local raw materials,” Uzatom stated. The Times of Central Asia previously reported that the contract for the construction of the NPP was concluded on May 27th, during Russian President Vladimir Putin's visit to Tashkent, between the Directorate for NPP Construction under the Atomic Energy Agency and the Atomstroyexport joint stock company (Rosatom’s engineering department).

Green Light for Hydrocarbon Development in Kazakhstan’s Caspian Sea Sector

In a statement issued on 4 June, Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Energy announced that work on an oil and gas project to develop the Kalamkas-Sea and Khazar fields is now ready to begin. The Kalamkas-Sea and Khazar Fields Joint Development Project will be implemented by Kalamkas-Khazar Operating, a specially created venture comprising Kazakhstan’s national oil and gas company KazMunayGas (50%) and Russian oil company Lukoil (50%). Construction of the steel offshore platforms will begin in 2026 at Kazakh shipyards to ensure the earliest possible start of production at the Kalamkas-Sea field. The project aims to attract over $6 billion in direct investment and during its development phase, create up to 2,000 jobs. Once in operation, a further 300 posts will be added. The Kalamkas-Sea field, 50km long and 6km wide, sits in the central part of the north-eastern sector of the Caspian Sea, 64 km offshore at a depth of 6-7 meters. The Khazar field is located 30 km southwest of Kalamkas-Sea and 65 km northwest of the Buzachi Peninsula. The Kalamkas-Sea and Khazar fields are the only fields in the Kazakhstan sector of the Caspian Sea with confirmed reserves.    

Kyrgyzstan Lifts Ban on Mining of Uranium and Thorium

Deputies of the Kyrgyz Parliament have approved a bill lifting the ban on mining uranium and thorium by 69 votes in favor to three against. Parliamentarians are confident that the legislative changes will bring significant economic dividends to the country. The law banning uranium and thorium mining was passed in 2019. At that time, authorities wanted to sell the license to develop a deposit, but faced a significant pushback from residents who feared the project could harm the environment and damage the water table. The result was a complete ban on the entire territory of the Republic. In the Issyk-Kul region of Kyrgyzstan alone, 150,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste were accumulated from uranium mining in the last century. According to the Ministry of Emergency Situations, the country has 92 burial sites, with 23 tailing dumps containing uranium elements. Kyrgyzstan's total volume of poisonous and hazardous substances stands at 2.9 million cubic meters. The notes behind the new bill indicate that alternative sources of income are needed due to severe economic impacts over recent years. However, these activities must strictly comply with environmental norms and standards in uranium and thorium mining. Speaking in parliament, Minister of Natural Resources, Environment, and Technical Supervision, Melis Turganbayev assured deputies that the bill's passage would not harm the environment or the health of Kyrgyz citizens. “For uranium mining to be profitable, a deposit needs 40-50 tons. Kyrgyzstan lacks such reserves. There are occurrences from 0.01 to 0.08% in 83 locations. Our goal is not the uranium, but the associated metals,” Turganbayev said. Authorities plan to mine titanomagnetite, which is accompanied by uranium and thorium. Both elements will be processed at the Kara-Balta Combine in Chui Oblast. Thorium will be stored, while uranium will be sold to other states. Iskhak Masaliyev, one of the three deputies who voted against the bill, reminded his colleagues of discussions in the early 2000s on ecology. However, only now has it been possible to begin to eliminate harmful waste. Doctor of Geological and Mineral Sciences, academician Rozalia Jenchuraeva told The Times of Central Asia that the 2019 law banning mining was “a big folly” as it suspended all waste activities and impacted jobs, leaving hazardous materials lying no more than 20 meters deep are slowly contaminating the soil and water. “If they pull it all out, it will be wonderful. It will clean up the land. This is work for the Kara-Balta Combine. I think the government has decided to develop Kyzyl-Ompol, which is the right thing to do,” Jenchuraeva said. Jenchuraeva believes that Kyrgyzstan has qualified personnel who have previously worked at uranium sites, know how to mine uranium and thorium, and can develop the deposits using their expertise and resources. Earlier, President Japarov met with residents near the Kyzyl-Ompol deposit. “The development of Kyzyl-Ompol will create over a thousand jobs. This mine will become the second Kumtor (gold deposit). The local budget will cease to be subsidized, and the people will get richer,” the president said. Kyzyl-Ompol is...

Renewable Energy “Key” for Uzbekistan: Interview with IFC Regional Manager

Neil McKain, the IFC regional manager for Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, says renewable energy sources are helping Uzbekistan reduce natural gas consumption. The country can become a regional leader in renewable energy sources, he told The Times of Central Asia in an interview.   ТСА: To begin, could you give us an overview of the current state of renewable energy in Uzbekistan? Neil McKain: Uzbekistan has significant renewable energy potential — primarily solar and wind — and is well equipped to fulfill its growing energy needs and transition to a clean energy economy. Renewable energy can help diversify the energy mix and reduce the country’s heavy reliance on natural gas. The government is focused on increasing the share of renewables in power production by up to 25 GW, or 40% of the country’s overall electricity consumption, by 2030. These efforts support the country's clean energy transition and address the increasing demand for energy in Uzbekistan’s economy and among its citizens. In this context, the World Bank Group is helping Uzbekistan develop 1,000 MW of solar and 500 MW of wind energy by attracting private sector investments.   ТСА: With these developments, what challenges does Uzbekistan face in transitioning to renewable energy? McKain: Like many countries, Uzbekistan faces many challenges as it transitions. The government has substantial natural gas reserves, and the economy relies heavily on fossil fuels. Transitioning away from these energy sources can be economically and politically challenging. It requires building public support and raising awareness of the many benefits of renewable energy. In addition, building the necessary infrastructure, such as solar farms, wind turbines, and an updated electrical grid, requires significant investment, time, and technical expertise. As renewable energy sources are intermittent, developing efficient energy storage solutions will be vital to ensuring a stable energy supply. Also, securing the required capital can take time, as it often involves enormous upfront costs and long-term investment before seeing returns. Addressing these multifaceted challenges will require coordinated efforts from the government, private sector, and international partners.   ТСА: What is the IFC's involvement in renewable energy projects in Uzbekistan? McKain: The IFC is deeply committed to supporting renewable energy in emerging markets, and Uzbekistan is a key country. We've been involved in several initiatives, including advising on and financing solar power projects. One of our first projects is a solar plant in the Navoi region, which provides electricity to 31,000 homes. This project was established through a public-private partnership (PPP) between the Uzbek government and Masdar, the United Arab Emirates’ flagship renewable energy company. IFC assisted the government as a transaction adviser in designing and tendering the PPP under its Scaling Solar Program. It is now a significant milestone in the country's renewable energy journey. In collaborationwith other lenders, IFC also provided a financing package to support the construction of a 500-megawatt wind farm in the Navoi region, which Masdar is also building. Capable of powering 500,000 homes, it will be the largest facility in Central Asia—and, incidentally, the largest wind farm IFC has ever sponsored. Together with our state and...

Kyrgyzstan Plans to Export Electricity to Pakistan Next Year

Kyrgyzstan's energy ministry has presented a project to develop the country's National Energy Program until 2035. As part of this project, both Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan will export electricity to Pakistan next year. The CASA-1000 (Central Asia - South Asia) program plans to supply electricity to Afghanistan and Pakistan. The Kyrgyz side forecasts that around 1.25 billion kilowatt-hours of summertime electricity will be exported to South Asia in 2025. In summer Kyrgyzstan's reservoirs are full, and hydroelectric power plants produce a lot of electricity, which has nowhere to go -- unlike in winter, when there is an electricity shortage in the country. At the same time, officials plan to increase electricity production and exports yearly. In 2026 supplies are expected to grow to 1.7 billion kWh. Electricity exports starting from 2028 will average 1.75 billion kWh. At the beginning of this year Kyrgyzstan signed a joint declaration with Pakistan and Tajikistan to resume the CASA-1000 project. It began constructing high-voltage power lines near the border with Tajikistan, after construction had been halted due to the border conflict between Bishkek and Dushanbe. Power lines were also resumed in Afghanistan, where construction was also stopped after the Taliban came to power.

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