• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 43 - 48 of 84

Uzbekistan Ranks First in Central Asia in Number of Marriages and Last in Divorces

The Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Interstate Statistical Committee has published its compendium for 2022 on its website. Getting acquainted with the statistics of marriages and divorces of the collection, one sees that in 2022, there were 8.4 marriages and 1.4 divorces for every 1,000 people in Uzbekistan. The marriage indicator is 6.5 in Kazakhstan, and there were 2.3 divorces per 1,000; in Kyrgyzstan the data indicates 7.0 marriages and 1.8 divorces. Also of note was data on the intensity of internal migration, with Kazakhstan leading in this category with 41.3 per 1,000 people moving internally in 2022. In Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, the indicator was 6.0, respectively. Tajikistan's data for 2021-2022 is not provided; the country showed 3.7 results per 1,000 people for 2020. At the same time, the State Statistics Committee of Uzbekistan reports that in 2023, there were 283,800 marriages and 49,200 divorces in the nation. In Kazakhstan, 90,300 marriages were registered between January and September of 2023, an 8.1% decrease from the same period in 2022. Based on the data that was submitted, there were 12,400 divorces in the first nine months of last year, and also an 8.1% decrease in divorces year-on-year. In Kyrgyzstan, 12,552 couples filed for divorce in 2023, while 45,495 marriages were registered before the law. Statistics for Tajikistan in 2021 (data for 2022 isn't yet available) showed that there were 7.6 marriages and 1.4 divorces per thousand. In 2023, 76,444 marriages and 10,298 divorces were officially registered. The statistical collection also includes data on these nations' populations, rates of illness and disability, educational attainment and cultural practices, economic activity, the material and housing circumstances of the populace, the environment, and crime.

Problems and Prospects for Development: Raushan Yeschanova on Art in Kazakhstan

It is said that art can open doors to the depths of the human soul, transport one to other worlds and allow one to see and experience things from a new perspective. The history of Almaty is rich in culture and creativity, and today, Almaty-based art historian Raushan Yeschanova shares her thoughts on contemporary art in Kazakhstan, the problems of its development, and the role that will be played by the new Museum of Contemporary Art, which is scheduled to open this year.   TCA: Tell us how you came to study art? Traveling has always made me think about how mankind was able to create such masterpieces and what moved them. And it's not just about the Renaissance, Art Nouveau and or contemporary art; it’s also about ancient Egyptian art and artifacts from lost civilizations. In addition, I worked as an interior designer, and this required a good knowledge of interior styles. After all, art is not only paintings and sculptures, but also architecture, and I always wanted to immerse myself in it.   TCA: How do you assess the influence of the national culture of Kazakhstan on the development of contemporary art in the country? If we talk about the present time, at the moment our country is experiencing, I would say, "a period of revival in art". Since the formation of the fine arts school in Kazakhstan occurred during the accession of Kazakhstan to Russia, our art developed under the influence of Russian painting, which in turn looked to Western European art. After all, before the period of annexation there was only decorative applied art, and to engage in painting was forbidden due to religious traditions. After a century of development, once ideological principles became less strict, artists have returned to their "nomadic" past in which they find more and more sacred knowledge about life   TCA: What themes and motifs from history and culture most often inspire contemporary artists? They are inspired by rock art, symbols, mythological subjects… Kazakhstan is first of all a steppe, it is a yurt - and this universe is a source of inspiration for many. Artists use different styles, for example, combining ancient techniques with painting or, for example, placing the meaning of human existence into the national female headdress, the "saukele".   TCA: What problems do contemporary artists face in Kazakhstan? The main problem facing contemporary artists is the underdeveloped art market within the country. Many established artists live and work outside of Kazakhstan. As for young artists, it is the lack of quality institutions aimed at the realization of their creativity. There is no opportunity to participate in exhibitions, and the basis for promotion is social networks. Despite the presence of galleries in the cities, not all artists have the opportunity to display their works, as the issue of selling work is often controversial. Also, many talented artists have second jobs where their labor is better paid; for example, in the field of interior design, wall painting or creating...

Kazakhstan’s Dimash Kudaibergen becomes UN Ambassador

The Kazakhstani musician, singer and composer Dimash Kudaibergen has been named a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador for Migration, according to a post by Kudaibergen on his Instagram page. The UN's International Organization for Migration (IOM) called Dimash "an extremely popular singer in Central Asia and beyond".  The 29-year-old singer is originally from Aktobe, and became a global celebrity after participating in the Chinese musical competition The Singer in 2017. "Our new regional and national Goodwill Ambassadors are inspiring people around the world. With IOM, they will contribute to improving people's lives. We welcome you to IOM!" the organization said in a statement. The United Nations International Organization for Migration is an intergovernmental organization in the field of migration. It was founded in 1951 and is committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society. The organization has 175 member states and eight observer states.

Kozy Korpesh – Bayan Sulu: Kazakhstan’s Valentine’s Day

February 14th may be the international Valentine's Day which is celebrated all over the world, but Kazakhstan has its own unique day dedicated to love and devotion, Kozy Kөrpesh - Bayan Sulu, which is celebrated on April 15th. The holiday is centered on a legend from an epic poem from the 13th-14th century, which conveys a story of love and strength of spirit. Sometimes likened to a Kazakh Romeo and Juliet, the story tells of two heroes - a young man named Kozy Korpesh and a girl called Bayan Sulu - who fight against prejudice and confront an unrighteous ruler to be together. Their story symbolizes the power of courage in the face of obstacles. In honor of the pair, who, according to a folk legend, were buried in a mausoleum near the village of Tansyk in the East Kazakhstan region, a memorial structure was erected which has been included in the list of historical and cultural monuments and under state protection since 1982. Another monument was erected in the city of Ayagoz in 2013. Each Kazakhstani has his or her own approach to this day. Some, like Valeria from Astana celebrate it with friends. For them, it's not only a day of love, but an opportunity to remember their culture and traditions. "I learned about this legend back in high school. Now, even though I study abroad, I try to get together with friends to celebrate it. For me, it’s a reminder of my homeland." Others, like Sarzhanbek from Almaty, came to appreciate the story later. "The first time I learned about it I was still in school, but I didn't pay much attention to it,” he told TCA. “However, one day, I went to the theater for a production based on this legend. It was very interesting; it's amazing how rich the history of Kazakhstan is." Alua, a student of the Faculty of Pedagogy from Taraz, told TCA that she thinks events dedicated to Kazakhstan's Valentine's Day should be introduced in schools. She believes it is important to preserve and pass on this holiday to younger generations so they can know and respect the traditions of their country. "We should celebrate it, because it’s our traditional holiday,” she told TCA. “Traditions should be remembered and honored.”

Uzbek Film “Dreamers” Wins Award at Cannes World Film Festival

A documentary film entitled "Dreamers", released by BWG Production in Uzbekistan, has won the award for "Best Historical Film of December" at the World Film Festival in Cannes, France. This win opens the door for the movie to compete for the festival's prized "Film of the Year" title. Ruslan Saliev, the film's director, hailed the success as extraordinary for Uzbek film. He was confident that Dreamers, which explores the nation's historical suffering, would strike a chord with viewers around the world. Saliev emphasized the value of these festivals in showcasing the nation’s cultural legacy abroad. He also hoped for the chance to represent Uzbekistan at more international film festivals. "The use of reconstructions and art installations as a modern artistic interpretation in the documentary film Dreamers [should] be considered a positive experience," explained Uzbek film critic Mohinur Ahmetjonova. "Of course, this approach doesn't always fully reveal the [true] reality, but it gives an effective result in creating a general representation. But when it comes to covering the historical truth, it is noticeable that there is an attempt to avoid the bloody past and to present the atrocities that happened in a [softer light]. It's no coincidence that the approach of trying to describe the achievements of the period has caused several objections by historians and film experts." "The fact that the filmmakers tried to combine large-scale events in one film gives the impression that they were a little distracted from the original goal... in general, in this period when new views on history are being formed, it's natural that there are different opposing opinions about the film," Ahmetjonova added. Dreamers won the prize over the English film The Shamrock Spitfire, which tells the story of an Irish military pilot during WWII.

70% Of Kazakhstanis Happy With Their Life, World Bank Survey Finds

According to the World Bank’s latest ‘Listening to Kazakhstan’ survey, around 70% of people in the country are happy with their life – a figure that has remained constant since its first survey in 2021.  The survey for 2023, conducted in partnership with the United Kingdom’s department for international development, monitors the economic and social wellbeing of Kazakhstan’s population, and provides insights into the impact of policy changes on households. The survey reaches 1,400 households in urban and rural areas. It revealed that public perceptions of economic conditions significantly improved last year. It found that a higher percentage of respondents in 2023 believed it was a good time to start a business compared to 2021 and 2022. However, this opinion dipped in the final quarter of 2023.   Around three-quarters of respondents expressed optimism about the country’s long-term economic outlook. This optimism was especially strong in respondents aged 18-24 and in high-income families. The survey showed that support for the government’s reforms increased to 67% last year and was particularly high among young people, the elderly, and people in rural areas.  Metin Nebiler, head of the World Bank in Kazakhstan’s poverty and equity team, commented: “We found it very encouraging to see that the overall wellbeing of Kazakhstanis has been improving. The views on the [economic] outlook and the government’s performance are stable or trending positive.”  However, citizens also registered several concerns. Inflation remains a significant issue for 94% of respondents, although the annual inflation rate declined in 2023. The survey also found that challenges such as income inequality (92%) and worries about job losses (over 50%) still need to be addressed. Additionally, perceptions of government openness and anti-corruption efforts only showed only slight improvement.

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