• KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 5

Kazakhstan and Netherlands Cooperate in Agriculture and Healthcare

On 10 May in Astana, contracts were signed by Kazakhstan and the Netherlands to promote bilateral relations in both agriculture and healthcare, reported Kazakh Invest. The Ministry of Agriculture of Kazakhstan and the Dutch company VISCON signed a memorandum of understanding to implement the construction of an automated center for crop production. Employing artificial intelligence technologies and in vitro cultivation methods, the project will improve the sustainability, quality, and yield of crops in Kazakhstan. Running from 2024-2030, the initiative is set to produce 12 million seedlings annually. The Ministry of Agriculture also signed a contract with Royal GD to modernize Kazakhstan’s current veterinary service. By upgrading quality control, the joint project will ensure that Kazakhstan’s livestock products meet international standards and hence, boost its exportation to Western markets. With regard to the nation’s health, the Ministry of Healthcare of Kazakhstan and Royal Philips signed a memorandum of cooperation through which the Dutch company will localize the production of portable ultrasound devices in Kazakhstan.    

Kazakhstan Suspends Sugar Exports Until August

To ensure an uninterrupted supply of sugar to residents during the summer season, Kazakhstan’s government has announced a temporary ban on its export of sugar to third countries until 31 August. The decision made on 6 May, will affect fellow members of the Eurasian Economic Union - Armenia, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, and Russia - but will not impact international transit. Kazakhstan’s warehouses can store about 256 thousand tons of its own reserves and imported sugar, which is enough to meet half of the country’s annual requirement of 500-550 thousand tons. According to Deputy Minister of Agriculture Erbol Taszhurekov, current stocks of sugar and raw cane amount to 136 thousand tons. Combined with the quota of 120 thousand tons of imported Russian sugar, reserves will reach 256 thousand tons by 31 August. In addition, Kazakhstan has a duty-free import quota of 300 thousand tons of raw cane for processing until the end of 2024. The average monthly sugar consumption is 46 thousand tons, and in summer, reaches 60 thousand tons.  Thus, explained the deputy minister, “the existing sugar reserves are more than enough to meet demand until the new harvest.” Kazakhstan also plans to negotiate with Russia to increase the quota of its supply of sugar by 100 thousand tons until the end of the year.  

Uzbekistan to Increase Production and Export of Agricultural Produce

At a government meeting chaired by President Shavkat Mirziyoyev on March 18th, it was reported that in 2023, Uzbekistan produced 23 million tons of fruit and vegetables, but exports reaped just $2 billion, far short of the anticipated $5 billion. Over the past year, over ten new markets have opened for Uzbek agricultural exports, including Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Colombia, and Indonesia, raising the number of countries importing agricultural products from Uzbekistan to 85. There are however, shortfalls in the sector. The potential of one million hectares of land previously used for grain and earmarked for the cultivation of fruit and vegetables is yet to be exploited. The same applies to 508,000 hectares of household plots plus a further 260,000 hectares of land lying barren. At the meeting, the head of state expressed his readiness to consider any steps necessary for increasing agricultural and food exports in the coming year: “Controlling inflation and ensuring currency stability are directly related to exports. If we do not expand the conditions for export along with an increase in production, the result will not meet expectations.” To that end, the head of state supported the proposal to boost agricultural exports by opening Uzbekistan’s trading houses in major port cities such as Nagoya, Mersin, Rotterdam, Qingdao, Klaipeda, and Doha. One of the most vital issues is the certification of Uzbek agricultural produce for export. Following the launch of the first private laboratory with international accreditation at the Agricultural Services Centre in Yukorichirchik, $8 million will be invested in similar modern laboratories in Zangiata, Fergana, and Samarkand this year. A reference laboratory will also be opened in Tashkent to ensure that private laboratories comply with international standards.

Kazakhstan to Satisfy Italy’s Appetite for Horsemeat

The Kazakh Minister of Trade and Integration Arman Shakkaliev has announced plans by Kazakhstan and Italy to create a joint product brand 'Made in Kazakhstan'. The venture aims to address Italy's growing demand for horsemeat; a commodity currently imported from other countries and reportedly valued at over $140 million worth per year. In addition to chilled horsemeat, the minister reported that 'Made in Kazakhstan' would also supply Italy with locally sourced caviar and honey. The initiative will benefit both countries. For Italy, it represents a fresh source of high-quality meat for the country's economically significant restaurant sector, and for Kazakhstan, open up a new market which by promoting agricultural development, will contribute to economical growth, especially in rural communities. Kazakhstan is currently a major supplier of horsemeat to countries such as Mongolia, Argentina and Uruguay.

China Poised to Increase Imports of Agricultural Produce from Kazakhstan

In recent years, Kazakhstan has seen a steady growth in China’s demand for its organic and environmentally friendly agricultural produce. As reported at a meeting on March 4th between Kazakhstan’s Minister of Agriculture, Aidarbek Saparov and Chinese Ambassador to Kazakhstan Zhang Xiao, in 2023, exports almost doubled to $1.01 billion. The Kazakh Ministry of Agriculture relayed the ambassador’s assurance that the importation of meat, grain, and other agricultural products from Kazakhstan is set to continue. The minister stated that Kazakhstan has the potential to increase its export of grain to China to two million tons per annum and asked the ambassador for assistance in accelerating the signing of bilateral agreements on the export of a wider range of agricultural products including chilled meat, poultry, offal, beet pulp, and potatoes. Saparov also requested assistance in accrediting new Kazakh enterprises to export livestock produce to China. In early February China lifted restrictions, imposed since 2005, on the import of poultry Kazakhstan. A ban on the import of meat, resulting from concerns over foot-and-mouth disease and in place since 2022, was similarly overturned. The lifting of the restrictions allows exports of frozen beef and pork from the south-eastern regions of Kazakhstan to resume.

Start typing to see posts you are looking for.