• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 33

Russia to Allocate Over $23 Million for Remediation of Uranium Tailings in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyz members of parliament have approved an agreement between Kyrgyzstan and Russia on funds for the remediation of sites contaminated with uranium tailings. The ratification corresponds to a previous deal by the Kyrgyz government and Russian state company Rosatom under the framework of a Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) program to rehabilitate territories affected by uranium production. Kyrgyz Deputy Emergency Situations Minister Azamat Mambetov, speaking at the session of the Kyrgyz parliament, described the details of the agreement with Russia regarding the uranium tailings ponds. "At our request, the Russian Federation will allocate an additional 2.141 million rubles ($23.1 million). According to the draft agreement submitted for approval, these funds will be used for work and delivery of equipment, [and] they are exempt from taxes. Five facilities in Kyrgyzstan will be rehabilitated," Mambetov said. According to the deputy minister, these are three tailing dumps left over from uranium mining in western Kyrgyzstan, and two tailing dumps in the south of the country. According to some sources, the first Soviet atomic bomb was filled with uranium mined in the south of Kyrgyzstan in the Batken region. It should be noted that the tailings dumps in Chatkal district (western Kyrgyzstan) currently threaten the ecology of not only Kyrgyzstan, but also of neighboring Uzbekistan. The Chatkal River, which flows near the tailings dams, is a transboundary river that flows into one of Uzbekistan's reservoirs -- and from which Tashkent and the Tashkent region draw their drinking water. Mr. Mambetov said that today the reclamation of uranium tailings sites in southern Issyk-Kul region and in Naryn region is almost completed. When the interstate program for reclamation of territories was drawn up in 2013, these tailings were considered the most problematic. According to Rosatom, 450,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste were concentrated in the Naryn region when work began. The work there is complicated by the fact that there is the risk of landslides in the area of the tailing dump. However, Russian specialists promise to fully complete the reclamation process by August 2024. The volume of accumulated radioactive waste in the Issyk-Kul region is 150 thousand cubic meters. Uranium mining there was conducted from 1952 to 1966. After the mining was completed, the surface of the site was covered with a special layer of soil. But over time, the ground has been eroded by surface waters and the site began to pose a threat to the local environment once again. The works there should also be completed this year. Recall that Lake Issyk-Kul, located just a few hundred meters from the facility, is Kyrgyzstan's main tourist attraction. According to the Kyrgyz Ministry of Emergency Situations, there are 92 burial sites of toxic and radioactive substances in the country. Of these, 23 tailings sites contain uranium elements, while the remaining ones contain radioactive rock residues, heavy metals and cyanide. The total volume of poisonous and hazardous substances is 2.9 million cubic meters. As reported by Rosatom, there are currently more than 40 large legacy nuclear...

Plastic Bags, Utensils to Be Met With Fines in Kyrgyzstan’s Issyk-Kul Basin

A law imposing fines on the import and sale of plastic bags and utensils is aimed at reducing the harmful effects of polymeric materials on health and the environment in the Kyrgyz Republic, according to the press service of the Ministry of Natural Resources, Ecology and Technical Supervision of Kyrgyzstan. The ban will take effect in the resort and recreational area of Issyk-Kul, as well as in reserves and natural parks of Kyrgyzstan. The ban was signed by President Japarov last year, since when deputies and the Ministry of Natural Resources of have been working on finalizing its details. One sticking point is that the authorities still can't decide whether to ban all plastic or to make an exception for some products. Shashlyk vendor, Issyk-Kul; Photo: TCA "The list of plastic products banned for circulation includes all kinds of disposable plastic utensils, disposable plastic packaging for food, plastic bottles, disposable plastic packaging for eggs, plastic coffee capsules, [and plastic] bags for food," the law states. But, as the Ministry of Natural Resources notes, the law is still being amended and there is a lack of clarity. Meanwhile, food vendors in the Issyk-Kul region say that not all citizens are ready to give up plastic bags and bottles. Therefore, while large stores in Issyk-Kul have stopped selling disposable tableware and replaced them with paper products and Tetra Pak substitutes, the law is poorly enforced in markets and smaller outlets. Lake Issyk-Kul; Photo: TCA According to the Ministry of Natural Resources, Ecology and Technical Supervision, the Supervision Service has not imposed a single fine so far, with only warnings being issued. However, they say that as soon as all of the controversial issues have considered, sellers and producers will be fined. So far, the law applies only to sellers and manufacturers of plastic products. Private individuals can use bags, bottles and disposable tableware. In January of this year, the Issyk-Kul Region became the first in the country where a ban on the circulation of plastic was introduced. From 2027, the law will be expanded to ban the use of plastic containers throughout the country. Businesses are not satisfied, however, complaining that their opinion was not taken into account in drafting the law. In their opinion, it would have been better to prescribe economic incentives for businesses. Currently, they argue, all soft drinks and vegetable oils are bottled in plastic bottles, and it's difficult to find replacements for them. In addition, Kyrgyzstan does not yet have large production facilities for alternative containers such as paperboard-and-foil Tetra Paks or glass bottles. Most plastic goods are imported into Kyrgyzstan from abroad, mainly from countries which are not planning to give up disposable plastic containers and are only increasing their production. Meanwhile, Kyrgyzstan's environmentalists have long been sounding the alarm. The biggest danger to the country's ecology is plastic bottles and cellophane bags, which can be scattered by the wind over a large area. For example, the problem of toxic plastic pollution is particularly acute in...

Kyrgyzstan joins #EUBeachCleanup global campaign to clean Issyk-Kul beach

BISHKEK (TCA) — Marine litter is a global challenge. Every year millions of tons of trash end up in the ocean and seas. It is estimated that by 2050 there could be more plastic than fish in the sea. Kyrgyzstan faces this challenge too, especially during and after the summer season at Lake Issyk-Kul. Continue reading

Kyrgyzstan: OSCE starts 2019 Issyk-Kul Lake clean-up campaigns with local communities

BISHKEK (TCA) — The OSCE Programme Office in Bishkek on 19 July launched the first of four clean-up campaigns at Issyk-Kul Lake, in Kyrgyzstan, as an integral part of a roundtable discussion on the importance of the involvement of public institutions and society, and public awareness on environmental issues. The discussion is taking place in Chok-Tal village and organized by the Issyk-Kul Aarhus Centre, the Clean Issyk-Kul Public Foundation, and the Chon-Sary-Oy ayil local authority with support of the OSCE Programme Office in Bishkek. Continue reading

First Tashkent–Tamchy flight brings tourists from Uzbekistan to Kyrgyzstan’s Issyk-Kul

BISHKEK (TCA) — On June 27, Kyrgyzstan welcomed the first tourists from Uzbekistan to Issyk-Kul Lake on an inaugural flight from Tashkent to Tamchy. During the 2019 summer holiday season this international charter flight is expected to bring nearly 3,000 tourists. The flight marketing is provided thanks to assistance from the U.S. Government through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), as part of its efforts to strengthen tourism and create jobs in Central Asia, the US Embassy in Bishkek reported. Continue reading

ADB to improve wastewater management in lakeshore tourist areas in Kyrgyzstan

BISHKEK (TCA) — The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has approved a $36.52 million financing package to help improve wastewater management systems and strengthen the sustainability of water supply and sanitation facilities in the two lakeshore cities of Balykchy and Karakol on Issyk-Kul lake, one of the most popular tourist destinations in Kyrgyzstan, ADB’s Country Office said. Continue reading

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