• KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00061 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 4

Kyrgyzstan Proposes To Fine People For Speaking Substandard Kyrgyz

Kyrgyzstan's National Commission on State Language is proposing to introduce fines for people working in certain jobs if they do not speak Kyrgyz well enough. It has submitted the corresponding bill for public discussion. The law "On State Language" sets out a list of people who are obliged to know the state language, and use it while performing their official duties -- be they in socio-cultural, educational, or other professional spheres. The National Commission proposes that people working in certain professions must speak Kyrgyz at an average (B2) level if they are ethnic Kyrgyz, and at least the basic level (A2) if they are a member of another ethnic group. Foreign citizens living in the republic, or intending to obtain immigrant status, should speak at least elementary (A1) Kyrgyz. The draft bill reads: "It is proposed to introduce a new article into the Code of Offenses, according to which violation and non-compliance with the requirements of the legislation on language entails a fine of 5,000 som ($57) for individuals and 17,000 som ($194) for legal entities. In addition, the National Commission proposes to increase fines for texts in advertising and other visual information that do not meet the standards of literary Kyrgyz language.

Prospective Kazakh Citizens Must Know Country’s Language and History

Under a new law, people applying for Kazakh citizenship will be refused if they do not show at least basic knowledge of the country's language, history and constitution, reports Kursiv. Ministry of Internal Affairs representative Shyngys Alekeshev commented on the law: "The elementary level will be determined by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education. The purpose of the amendments is rapid adaptation and integration into society. Knowledge of the language, first of all, is necessary for the citizens themselves, wishing to obtain our citizenship, to more quickly integrate into society and participate in the life of the state". The ministry added that the legislative amendments are in line with global practice. Earlier it was reported that the authorities intend to teach the Kazakh language to Russian-speaking children and toddlers who have arrived from other countries. For this purpose, the Ministry of Education will create a program of "early immersion in the Kazakh language" in kindergartens and schools. Officials emphasize that this will help to form "Kazakh identity in young citizens".

Uzbek Politician Decries Dominance of Russian Language in Country

Alisher Kadyrov, leader of the Milliy Tiklanish Party and Vice-Speaker of the Legislative Chamber of the Oliy Majlis of Uzbekistan, has proposed a ban on the provision of public services to persons who don't speak the Uzbek language. He expressed this opinion in response to a statement by the chairman of the Russian State Duma, Vyacheslav Volodin. Kadyrov said that the Uzbek language should be defined in legislation as a mandatory language. "In our laws, in addition to creating conditions for citizens of other nationalities to study their native language and values in kindergarten and at school, the Uzbek language should be defined as compulsory," he wrote in his Telegram channel. The politician stated that he believes it should be impossible for a person who doesn't know Uzbek to be employed in the civil service or use state services. Earlier, Kadyrov suggested limiting the use of Russian on Uzbek television and in education. The party leader stated that a norm on teaching primary education in Uzbek should be introduced into legislation. "We have not been able to teach Russian compatriots the Uzbek language for 100 years. On the contrary, it has become customary that Uzbeks send their children to be educated in Russian. In Tashkent, the number of schools where education is not in Uzbek has grown. Unfortunately, more than 90% of pupils at such schools are Uzbeks," the Vice-Speaker wrote. Kadyrov's statements run counter to Article 19 of the Uzbek Constitution, which states that "all citizens have the same rights and freedoms and are equal before the law regardless of sex, race, nationality, language, religion, beliefs, social origin, or social status."

Tajikistan’s Rahmon Wants Government Staff to Speak Three Languages

Tajikistan's president Emomali Rahmon has instructed all government officials in the country to master two foreign languages at a high level within a year, according to a report by Turkmenportal. The Tajik head of state commented that knowledge of two foreign languages at the same level as Tajik is vital for them to work effectively. From April 1, employees of state bodies, local state authorities and state organizations will be enrolled in compulsory foreign (Russian, English or others) language courses for a year and a half, according to a report by Interfax-Kazakhstan. “This initiative is being implemented in order to strengthen the professional skills, political outlook and language skills of the employees of state bodies, local government authorities and management bodies,” reads the report.

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