• KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01181 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00210 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09404 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 8

Roundtable on Uzbekistan’s Reform Agenda

The 2nd Roundtable of Uzbekistan’s Country Platform was held last week in Tashkent. Backed by the European Union, the event provided a platform for discussions amongst over 80 government partners and international institutions on Uzbekistan’s reform agenda and coordinate support activities. As reported by the Delegation of the European Union to Uzbekistan, the participants agreed to continue collaboration through more than 13 sectoral working groups supporting issues prioritized by the Uzbekistan–2030 Strategy including agriculture, energy security, green growth, and the rule of law. Led by the Agency for Strategic Reforms (ASR) under the President of Uzbekistan and the Ministry of Economy and Finance of Uzbekistan, and with secretarial assistance from the European Union, the Country Platform aims to foster effective coordination. Bakhodir Rakhmatov, Director of the Agency for Strategic Reforms, commented: “Constructive collaboration between development partners and government ensures achievement of the priority reform objectives identified by President Mirziyoyev aimed at creating a more prosperous and sustainable future for all. The ASR plays a pivotal role in coordinating the engagement of ministries and agencies with development partners.” Taking over the support previously provided by the World Bank in May, the European Union committed to assisting the Country Platform until the end of 2025. “The European Union is honored to co-chair and promote the Country Platform as a forum for open dialogue, cooperation and collaboration between Uzbekistan and development partners,” said Charlotte Adriaen, Ambassador of the European Union to Uzbekistan. “The common goal is to support Uzbekistan in its reform path. The Platform is an opportunity to join forces, to effectively move together bringing prosperity, sustainable development, leaving no one behind.”    

Uzbekistan Launches Reforms to Boost Economy

On February 13th Uzbekistan’s president Shavkat Mirziyoyev chaired a government meeting to review strategic reforms planned for this year in five key areas — transport, urbanization and town planning, entrepreneurship, agriculture, and energy.  The government’s plan "Uzbekistan-2030" aims to increase the country's gross domestic product to $160bn and annual per capita income to $4,000 by 2030, turning Uzbekistan into an upper-middle income country.  Transport is seen as a key part of economic development. The landlocked Uzbekistan needs to diversify its air and railway routes. Officials reported that last year six airlines were created and 28 new aircraft were purchased, while the private sector was involved in the management of Samarkand International Airport. Mr Mirziyoyev gave orders to accelerate the transformation of the companies Uzbekistan Airports and Uzbekistan Airways, and to continue transferring airports to the private sector. In the next seven years, the number of cities and districts with a population of more than 300,000 people is projected to increase from the current 13 to 28. Due to the lack of general plans, some cities and towns are expanding only by increasing their area, which leads to higher infrastructure costs and shrinking agricultural land areas. Therefore there is a pressing need to develop a new law on urbanization. The meeting also considered the issue of transferring certain other functions of the state to the private sector, including landscaping and management of free economic zones. Mr Mirziyoyev emphasized the need to create reliable guarantees for investors. “In 2024 we should complete all processes of building the foundation of a market economy and in 2025 bring the national economy to a completely new level of quality,” he commented.

President of Kazakhstan Outlines Vision for Country’s Development

In an interview with the newspaper, Egemen Qazaqstan, President of Kazakhstan, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev spoke about political reforms in Kazakhstan, the country’s economic course, plans for the construction of a nuclear power plant, relations with China, and whether he will participate in the next presidential election. Tokayev said he believes that 2023 was full of significant events for Kazakhstan, including the completion of major political reforms, the establishment of the Constitutional Court, the holding of elections of deputies to the Mazhilis (parliament) and Maslikhats (local councils) at all levels according to new rules, and the first ever elections of akims (mayors) to districts and cities of regional significance. Kazakhstan has begun to build a fair and competitive economic system, Tokayev said, diversifying and demonopolizing the economy, updating infrastructure, supporting business, and attracting investment. In Tokayev’s words, Kazakhstan will continue with a constructive and balanced foreign policy; in 2024, the country will chair several authoritative international organizations: the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, the Collective Security Treaty Organization, the Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia, the Organization of Turkic States, the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea, and the Islamic Organization for Food Security. This year, Kazakhstan will also host the World Nomad Games. Asked about the country’s new economic course for a Fair and Just Kazakhstan and the goal of doubling the size of the economy to $450 billion by 2029, Tokayev said it is completely achievable. “According to analysts from the International Monetary Fund, by the end of 2023, GDP in Kazakhstan should be over $259 billion, which is 15% more than in 2022. This is the most significant nominal growth in Central Asia. Positive dynamics are also registered in GDP per capita. According to the IMF forecast, by 2028 this figure will increase by a third – up to $16,800.” The President explained his position vis-à-vis plans for the construction of a nuclear power plant, saying that he pays special attention to the issue given that Kazakhstan is the world’s largest uranium producer and generates its own nuclear fuel. “As many in Kazakhstan are critical of the construction of nuclear power plants given the tragic consequences of tests at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, I proposed submitting the issue to a national referendum,” Tokayev said. “Citizens must consider and discuss all the experts’ arguments in order to make a balanced, thoughtful decision during the free expression of their will. This will be the decision of the people.” Commenting on relations with China, the President said that today, relations between Kazakhstan and China are developing in the spirit of friendship, neighborliness, and strategic partnership. Kazakhstan firmly supports the Belt and Road Initiative, Tokayev stated, emphasizing the unprecedented growth of bilateral trade, which reached $24.3 billion from January-October 2023. China is also one of the largest investors in the Kazakhstan, with direct Chinese investment having reached $24 billion. The common border with China and favorable geographical position of Kazakhstan as a bridge between the East and West opens up broad prospects for...

Kazakhstan’s Senate Speaker Highlights Major Laws Passed in 2023

Maulen Ashimbaev, the Speaker of the Senate, emphasized during the final plenary session of the chamber this year that the Parliament had passed a total of 92 laws in 2023, with significant implications for the political, economic, and social spheres of the country. Ashimbaev stated that 2023 was a year of substantial change and believed it marked a period of genuine political modernization within the framework of constitutional reforms under the President's leadership. "This year, constitutional amendments relating to Parliament were implemented. As a result of these constitutional reforms, the role of the chambers of Parliament has been enhanced. The legislative procedure has evolved, with laws being considered using new methodologies," said the Senate Speaker. He recollected that at the start of 2023, the Head of State appointed 10 Senate deputies by decree, including five nominees from the ANC for the first time. Regular elections of Senate deputies also took place in the regions, leading to a significant refreshment of the upper house of Parliament. "In January, the President issued a decree to dissolve the Mazhilis of Parliament; the Senate dutifully performed the functions of Parliament for two months," Ashimbaev recalled. "In total, Parliament passed 92 laws this year, ensuring the country's political stability and sustainable socio-economic development." The laws included constitutional legislation on judicial system issues, the prosecutor's office activities, and administrative reform matters. The adoption of the new Social Code was particularly noteworthy. Additionally, several critical laws were enacted, such as those relating to the return of illicitly obtained assets to the state and public control. "We approved the country's main financial document last month – the Republican budget for 2024-2026," concluded Maulen Ashimbaev. On December 27, 2023, the Mazhilis held its final plenary meeting of the year. Erlan Koshanov, the Speaker of the chamber, also reviewed the deputies' work over the year.

Kazakhstan: A decree on human rights demonstrates the government is responsive to the people’s demands

Democracy in Central Asia is evolving since the Soviet Union's collapse three decades ago. Despite a history of authoritarianism, the region is showing signs of human rights improvement and increased democratic representation. New voices are emerging, impacting societal change. It's crucial to recognize this progress while still addressing human rights issues and advocating for further democratic reforms. On December 10, 2023, the world celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), a g seminal document that established the universal recognition of fundamental human rights. The anniversary was marked by various events and initiatives around the globe, including a significant event in Geneva. In line with this celebration, the U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken announced the designation of Taliban leaders connected to restrictions on access to secondary education for women. President Kassym Jomart Tokayev of Kazakhstan also demonstrated his country's commitment to upholding human rights by signing a decree titled "On Further Measures of the Republic of Kazakhstan". This statute underlines Kazakhstan's commitment to implementing democratic reforms and integrating them into everyday public life. The Decree aligns the nation's democratic and human rights mechanisms with international standards, encouraging cooperation between the state, the United Nations (UN), and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). It has initiated practical measures like expert-led training sessions from the UN and OSCE to implement regional political reforms. Additionally, the Decree’s Action Plan details the executive, legislative, and judicial branches' the execution of reforms in collaboration with civil society and the international community with the ultimate aim of upholding the rule of law and human rights. These initiatives are consistent with President Tokayev's promise to build a "Just and Fair Kazakhstan" that will protect marginalized groups, support union activities, uphold assembly rights, and prevent violence and torture. Building gender equality Women's rights have become a focal point globally. Kazakhstan, with its nomadic heritage, has made significant strides in narrowing the gender gap compared to many other countries. Since joining the UN’s Human Rights Council for the 2022-2024 term, the country has prioritized gender equality and women's empowerment. Kazakhstan recently moved up 15 positions in the “Global Gender Gap” index due to successful reforms in the field of gender development where it is ranked 65 out of 146 countries. The recent Decree fundamentally strengthens gender equality. The Government is instructed to take systematic measures to promote equal rights and opportunities in all spheres of society, as well as to overcome all forms and manifestations of gender discrimination. The decree also encompasses legislation to deter domestic violence and promotes equal rights and safety for both men and women in the Republic of Kazakhstan, as endorsed by UN Security Council resolution 13251. This is a significant step forward in addressing gender-based violence and discrimination, reflecting the government's commitment to promoting human rights and gender equality. Combatting domestic violence A recent, and very public, tragedy in Kazakhstan represented domestic violence at its worst. To combat domestic violence effectively, it is essential to create...

President Tokayev’s Republic Day Speech Marks Thirty-Three Years of Independent Kazakhstan

In late October, Kazakhstan’s President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev delivered a speech on the eve of the country’s Republic Day holiday. While casting a view back to the declaration of independence in 1990, it was a multi-pronged evaluation of the events in the country’s current context. This approach allowed Tokayev to wear two hats – one as the head of state, which he has worn since 2019, and one as a professionally-trained political scientist and diplomat. Five main themes stood out in the President’s speech: The independence as the highest national value; the focus on a balanced, peaceful and co-operative foreign policy; the irreversibility of the recent progressive reforms which have strengthened rule of law and shifted the governance culture; the crucial role of the youth in shaping Kazakhstan’s future, and finally, the nation’s commitment to honoring the honest and dedicated work of its citizens. The President’s evaluation of his first theme, underlining the importance of the country’s independence, included a roll-call of more than a dozen unsung heroes of the early 1990s, who gave birth to the new state. “This declaration of independence,” he affirmed, “met the aspirations and expectations of the people and was adopted thanks to the wisdom and prudence of the country's patriots,” whose “courage and determination, shown at a critical hour can be regarded as true heroism.” While Tokayev did not include himself in that list, likely out of modesty, everyone listening to the speech knew that after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, he became the deputy foreign minister of a newly independent Kazakhstan in 1992. He stayed in that post for the better part of a decade before becoming deputy prime minister and then prime minister in 1999. From 2002 to 2007, he represented the country’s foreign ministry and served as state secretary. Thereafter, he variously spent two years as Director-General of the United Nations Geneva Office, and served as chairman of Kazakhstan’s Senate, until 2019 when he became President. Secondly, President Tokayev underlined that Kazakhstan’s balanced, peaceful and co-operative foreign policy was central to the nation’s strategy to consolidate and preserve its independence by safeguarding peace and harmony beyond its borders. The President’s message underscored the significance of Kazakhstan’s “precious legacy” of independence. This represents, he pointed out, the latest in a historical series of Kazakh states stretching back to Turkic Khaganates, the Golden Horde and the Kazakh Khanate. However, as Tokayev stressed, the present state of Kazakhstan represents not only a historical achievement but also an ongoing commitment to the future that shapes the country’s diplomatic strategy and its approach to global interactions. President Tokayev’s Republic Day speech also articulated the imperative of “zero tolerance” towards any manifestations of radicalism, extremism, legal nihilism, and everyday vandalism. These phenomena cannot be allowed because the maintenance of social stability and unity is the foundational domestic requirement for upholding sovereignty and statehood. His strict position on combatting these destructive forces is part and parcel of the government’s commitment ensure that the rule of law is respected...