• KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01185 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09377 -0.21%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 9

Kazakhstan to Reduce Dependence on Water from Neighboring Countries

Issues of modernizing water infrastructure and improving the water resources management system were discussed at a meeting of the Water Council of Kazakhstan chaired by Prime Minister, Alikhan Smailov, A post on the PM’s official website states. Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation, Nurzhan Nurzhigitov reported that Kazakhstan has 102.3 km3 of water, 54% of which is formed within the country, and the remaining 46% coming from neighboring countries. The annual consumption by economic sectors is about 25 km3 of water, of which 65% is used for agriculture, and 25% for industrial needs. To ensure the country's water security and solve the problem of shortages, a draft Comprehensive Plan for the Development of Water Resources for 2024-2030 has been developed. It provides for a number of urgent measures for the construction and reconstruction of reservoirs, and the reconstruction of hydraulic structures and irrigation systems. Implementation of the plan will increase available water resources by 3.7 cubic kilometers, and the area of irrigated land to 2.2 million hectares, as well as reduce annual losses of irrigation water by 3 cubic kilometers. In 2024-2026, it is planned to begin construction of 20 new reservoirs with a volume of 2.4 cubic kilometers in nine regions. This will increase the area of irrigated land by 250,000 hectares and reduce Kazakhstan’s dependence on neighboring countries for its water supply by an average of 25%. “We must annually introduce water-saving technologies on 150,000 hectares of irrigated lands. Now, implementation is carried out on 40-50,000 hectares per year. At the same time, in the southern regions where there is the greatest water shortage, the volume of implementation is the smallest,” said Smailov.

EDB Proposes Ten Steps to Preserve Irrigated Land Potential and Support Water Conservation in Central Asia

As outlined in a press release on the EDB website, in the summer of 2023, Central Asia was faced once again with water shortages, which have a significant impact on agriculture. The sector relies on irrigation, which consumes up to 80% of available water, and has a poor track record with regard to the efficient use of water resources. The irrigation infrastructure is over 50 years old. More than half of all irrigated land has become salinized, and 40% of water is lost through irrigation canals. A new Eurasian Development Bank (EDB) study entitled “Efficient Irrigation and Water Conservation in Central Asia” outlines ten practical steps for preserving irrigated land potential and promoting water conservation. The list includes four recommendations for adoption at a regional level and six at a national level. The measures are designed to save enough water each year to support sustainable development. Implementing the measures will require collaboration between governments, farmers and multilateral development institutions. The need for urgent action is intensified by the anticipated reduction in the flow of the Amu Darya River. Water deficit is a key structural constraint to socio-economic development in Central Asia. This region is among the most vulnerable to climate change, with temperatures rising at a faster rate than the global average. Periods of drought and low water are becoming more frequent, and the hydrological patterns of rivers and groundwater supplies are undergoing change. Glacier areas have been diminishing rapidly, with a 30% decrease over the last 50 years. Climate change is leading to reduced river flows at a time when the region’s demand for water is growing rapidly. The primary solution to the water deficit lies in improving irrigation practices. Agriculture in Central Asia is the largest consumer of water, with irrigation accounting for 100.4 km3 of the total 127.3 km3 (80%) of water used in the region in 2020. Historically, irrigation has played a vital role in developing agriculture and ensuring food security in the region. Central Asia boasts 10.1 million hectares of irrigated land, representing approximately 2.9% of the world’s total. This irrigated land generates nearly 66% of the region’s gross agricultural output in terms of value. However, Central Asia’s irrigation infrastructure is highly degraded and technically inadequate. It lacks the equipment needed for metering and distributing water for irrigation and controlling its use in the field. The average age of the irrigation infrastructure is over 50 years. Up to half of irrigated land is salinized. Water use in agriculture is inefficient, with 40% of water lost in the irrigation canal system. A commitment to conserving water appears to be the only solution to protecting the potential of irrigated land and food security in Central Asia. This shift in approach is imperative not only because of climate change and escalating water demand, but also to mitigate the anticipated decrease in the flow of the Amu Darya River from Afghanistan. By 2028, the combined effects of climate change, low-water periods and the commissioning of the Kosh-Tepa Canal in...

Promoting Sustainable Development in Central Asia: Key Highlights from the Eurasian Development Bank’s Roundtable

According to a press release issued by the Eurasian Development Bank (EDB), on November 16th, 2023, Almaty, Kazakhstan, served as the venue for a critical roundtable hosted by the EDB, titled "Promoting Sustainable Development in Central Asia". This gathering saw the participation of representatives from a wide range of international organizations and multilateral development banks. Attendees included the likes of the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the Islamic Development Bank, FAO, UNIDO, UNEP, ESCAP, UNDP, the World Health Organisation, the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea, and CICA. The agenda was packed with discussions revolving around irrigation, water challenges, environmental and social standards of international financial institutions, and case studies that showcased collaborations in project implementation12. The EDB's latest report, "Efficient Irrigation and Water Conservation in Central Asia", was introduced during the roundtable's first session. Nikolai Podguzov, Chairman of the EDB Management Board, underscored the essential interrelationship between water, food, and energy in Central Asia. He declared the development of the region’s water and energy resources as a strategic priority for the EDB. He also expressed concerns over an impending water deficit in Central Asia within the next five years, urging for collective action supported by multilateral development banks3. Tatiana Proskuryakova, the Regional Director for Central Asia at the World Bank, also spoke at the event. She emphasized the importance of sustainable development in Central Asia to international organizations and multilateral financial institutions. She revealed that the World Bank has allocated approximately a quarter of its $12 billion investment portfolio in Central Asia to water, energy, and environmental sectors. This proportion is expected to rise to almost half in the near future4. Following this, Evgeny Vinokurov, EDB Chief Economist, presented the study "Efficient Irrigation and Water Conservation in Central Asia". He proposed a ten-step solution to address the prevalent issues. The steps include establishing an International Water and Energy Consortium; fostering collaboration among multilateral banks; creating a regional cluster to produce irrigation equipment; consolidating efforts to strengthen cooperation with Afghanistan; using PPP instruments; instituting proper water accounting; gradually integrating investment charges into the tariff structure; improving land conditions; implementing digital technology, and leveraging state-of-the-art irrigation technology and laser levelling.