• KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 9

Water Levels of Kazakhstan’s Reservoirs Continue to Rise

On June 3, the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation announced that to date, the country's reservoirs have collected 75 billion cubic meters of water, 15 billion cubic meters more than last year. Over 12 billion cubic meters of the accumulated water is flood water. The statement updates statistics cited in an earlier report by Times CA In total, Kazakhstan's reservoirs can hold 89 billion cubic meters of water. Last year the country's agricultural sector used 14 billion cubic meters of water, and 24.4 billion cubic meters of water were used by other sectors across the country. Welcoming the news, representative of the ministry Moldir Abdualieva said, “The collection of flood water continues. Since the beginning of the flood situation, 3.3 billion cubic meters of water have been sent to Lake Balkhash, and about 6 billion cubic meters of water have been directed to the Caspian Sea”    

New Measures to Boost Agriculture in Uzbekistan

On May 10, Uzbekistan President Shavkat Mirziyoyev was presented with proposed adaptations in agricultural practice and the more efficient use of land in the light of climate change. In Uzbekistan, 3 million hectares of pastural and agricultural land have been now degraded, and approximately 2 million hectares, salinized. According to experts, by 2030, water resources in the region are at risk of diminishing by almost 6 percent as a direct result of climate change. In response, Uzbekistan has developed a national program, for which over $294 million is anticipated in grant funding, to adapt agriculture to climate change and mitigate its impact. The initiative aims to improve the condition of 1 million hectares of agro-ecological landscape and degraded pastures in the Aral Sea region. Protective forest belts will be created in Karakalpakstan, as well as in Khorezm, Bukhara, and Kashkadarya regions and drought-resistant plants such as licorice, rose hips, and sesame, cultivated in areas where water is scarce. A center will be established to analyze and forecast climate change, and agrometeorological stations installed in five regions of the country. In cooperation with Italy, a further center with a nursery will be built for intensive seed cultivation alongside a farm for plants resistant to drought and salinity. Since the need to preserve water is particularly acute in areas surrounding the lower reaches of the river Amu Darya, subsidies are to be allocated for laser-leveling land in Karakalpakstan. Grain and rice producers will be reimbursed up to 100 percent of the fuel costs required to level land using a laser level, in a move to increase yields and reduce water consumption by 15-20 percent. The program also encourages farmers to build more greenhouses. In recent years, the spread of greenhouses has increased 2.6-fold, and the volume of produce grown in such, has more than tripled. The greenhouse sector currently provides 80,000 thousand permanent jobs and a further 70,000 seasonal posts. To increase the efficiency of greenhouse farms, the program proposes to reimburse greenhouse owners 50 percent of the costs of hiring qualified foreign agronomists, as well as up to 20 percent of the costs of coal heaters.

Kyrgyzstan to Create a Ministry of Water Management

Kyrgyzstan's Agriculture Minister, Askarbek Janybekov, addressed journalists at a press conference, indicating plans to potentially establish a Ministry of Water Management in the country by the conclusion of 2024. "Now, there is a need to create a separate department for water issues. We must take our time. It will be a big organization. Therefore, we will consider it in stages, and we think at the end of next year we will create such a ministry," he said. Janybekov highlighted that discussions on this matter had surfaced in the Jogorku Kenesh and the recent National Kurultai. Previously, MP Emil Toktoshev had advocated for such an initiative.

Kazakhstan to Build New Reservoirs to Reduce Dependence on Neighboring Countries

The Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation of Kazakhstan on December 22nd said it is beginning work on the construction of nine new reservoirs out of a planned twenty to reduce Kazakhstan’s dependence on the water flow from neighboring countries by 25%. The commissioning of new reservoirs will also increase the area of irrigated land by 250,000 hectares and reduce the threat of flooding in 70 rural settlements with a population of 137,000 people. Currently, design documentation is being developed for the nine facilities, and negotiations are underway to attract investors to the construction of new reservoirs. The Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation has developed a Comprehensive Water Development Plan for 2024-2030. The document includes measures for the construction and reconstruction of reservoirs, reconstruction of hydraulic structures and irrigation systems. “The plan will be implemented in several stages,” said the Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation of Kazakhstan, Nurzhan Nurzhigitov. “In 2024-2026, it is planned to begin construction of twenty new reservoirs with a volume of 2.4 km³ in eleven regions. The implementation of the Comprehensive Plan will increase the volume of available water resources by 3.7 km³, expand the area of irrigated land to 2.2 million hectares, reduce annual losses of irrigation water by 3 km³, and also provide water supply to 41 settlements with a population of more than 55,000 people.” Kazakhstan, especially its southern regions, is highly dependent on irrigation water flow from upstream Kyrgyzstan. This past summer, Kyrgyzstan experienced a shortage of irrigation water and was forced to reduce the water flow to Kazakhstan’s southern Zhambyl region, which negatively impacted the region’s agriculture.

Kazakhstan Launches Modernized Water Pipeline in Atyrau and Mangystau Regions

On December 13th, Kazakhstan unveiled the modernized main water pipeline, Astrakhan-Mangyshlak, in its western Atyrau Region. The significant expansion of this facility was a result of comprehensive reconstruction, directed by President Tokayev's under the supervision of Kazakhstan's Prime Minister, Alikhan Smailov. The upgraded Astrakhan-Mangyshlak pipeline will provide an additional 60,000 cubic meters of water to the population, enterprises, and agriculture of Atyrau and Mangystau regions. The project includes the renewal of worn-out equipment and the replacement of two sections of the main pipeline, totaling about 177 km in length. As a result, the throughput capacity of the Astrakhan-Mangyshlak water pipeline increased from 110,000 to 170,000 cubic meters per day. "The reconstruction of the water pipeline was completed a year ahead of schedule due to accurate design solutions and rapid construction rates. This marks just one of many large-scale projects planned for the region," Smailov said. Additionally, a desalination plant capable of producing 50,000 cubic meters of water per day is currently under construction in the village of Kenderli. From this plant, a 105 km long main water pipeline will be built to Zhanaozen. Smailov further stated, "Our goal is not only to provide 100% of settlements with clean drinking water by 2026, but also to create a reliable framework for further sustainable water supply to the population and industries10. For this purpose, projects are being implemented to build new and modernize existing hydraulic structures and water conduits. Branching networks are being brought to settlements, and pumping modules from underground sources are being installed in remote villages. We have a lot of work ahead of us."

EDB and Kazakhstan Join Efforts for Water Investment

EDB and Kazakhstan Join Efforts for Water Investment The Eurasian Development Bank (EDB) has signed a memorandum of cooperation with Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation (MWRI). Ruslan Dalenov, Vice Chairman of the EDB Management Board, and Bekniyaz Bolat, MWRI First Deputy Minister, formalized this partnership during a ceremony in Astana on December 13th. The memorandum aims to establish long-term, mutually beneficial collaboration focused on mobilizing investment and grants for joint water and irrigation projects. “We are committed to jointly developing sustainable infrastructure solutions that will support important water-related projects and contribute to overall economic growth,” said Dalenov. The parties intend to actively cooperate in financing investment projects and exchange expertise through participation in workshops, conferences, and other events. The EDB is currently implementing the Central Asian Water and Energy Complex mega-project based on research and projections on the most effective ways to comprehensively develop the sector. Bank analysts have conducted studies such as Investment in the Water and Energy Complex of Central Asia, Regulation of the Water and Energy Complex of Central Asia, and Efficient Irrigation and Water Conservation in Central Asia. The latter outlines ten practical steps for preserving irrigated land potential and promoting water conservation, including four recommendations for adoption at a regional level and six at a national level. These measures are designed to conserve enough water annually to support sustainable development. The EDB has also identified projects to cater to the region’s electricity and water needs. The Bank is financing the construction of the 100 MW Kulanak HPP in the Kyrgyz Republic. Additionally, the Bank is evaluating several projects aimed at enhancing the region’s water and energy infrastructure.

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