• KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 2

Stay or Go? Uzbek Students Ponder Studies at Home, Abroad

Like many Uzbek students, Nigina Poziljonova left Uzbekistan to study at a university abroad. She doesn’t regret her decision. “Unlike the teachers I personally saw in Uzbekistan, professors are happy when students say, ‘I don’t understand, please explain again,’” said Poziljonova, who is studying for a bachelor’s degree in business economics with data science at the University of Cassino in Italy. “If necessary, they are willing to spend two hours after class for that student. If I fail one exam, I can take it 5 times a year for 3 years for free,” said the Uzbek student, who nevertheless describes her Italian experience as “more challenging than I anticipated.” --- The perceived shortcomings of higher education have long been a preoccupation in Uzbekistan, which has a large population of young people and is the most populous country – with about 35 million citizens – in Central Asia. Authorities are trying to fix the problem. Last month, Minister of Higher Education Kongratbay Sharipov said 20 underperforming universities will be closed because only 5-10% of their graduates are employed. Uzbekistan has more than 200 universities - 114 are state-run, 65 are private and 30 are foreign university branches, according to 2023 data. Uzbekistan had the fifth largest number of “tertiary” students (students who have completed secondary school) studying abroad – 109,945 – among countries around the world that were surveyed, according to UNESCO data in 2021. Around that time, more than 570,000 students were studying in higher education institutions in Uzbekistan. As in many countries, a lot of Uzbek students believe a quality education lies abroad and their increasing command of English and openness to the world can bring that goal within reach. Additionally, Uzbekistan’s El-Yurt Umidi foundation, a state agency launched in 2018, covers tuition fees and living expenses of talented people who want to study abroad. The foundation signs a contract with scholarship holders that requires them to return to Uzbekistan and work for three years. Many students study at universities in neighboring countries such as Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan, and then, after one or two years, transfer to universities in Uzbekistan. According to Kyrgyz data, some 38,857 Uzbek students studied in higher education institutions in Kyrgyzstan in 2022 and the figure reached 40,282 in 2023. Uzbek President Shavkat Mirziyoyev chaired a meeting in May at which officials discussed the 306 majors available at the bachelor’s level in Uzbekistan, and the 625 specialties at the master’s level. They acknowledged that some don’t meet international standards and labor market requirements and explored ways to revise them. Opening new courses in areas of high demand was also discussed. Another problem in Uzbek universities is an excessive focus on specializations. At one journalism university, specialists taught multiple sub-topics, including TV, international news, public relations, the internet, as well as military, travel, art, economic and sports journalism. Progress has been made. More people have access to higher education. Starting this year, state grants are given for one year, and in the remaining years of...

Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan: A Partnership Born From Rivalry

Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are the largest countries in Central Asia in terms of their economy, population, and vital infrastructure. In the first decades after the collapse of the USSR, the two republics visibly competed for regional supremacy, but this situation has changed dramatically. A Test of Sovereignty Uzbeks and Kazakhs are related Turkic peoples who have lived side by side for centuries, and, therefore, have experienced many mutual offenses from each other in their shared history. Perhaps this is the semi-official explanation for the rivalry between Tashkent and Astana during the reigns of the first presidents of these republics - Islam Karimov and Nursultan Nazarbayev. Another explanation for the struggle for leadership in Central Asia between Nazarbayev and Karimov lies in an old Kazakh proverb: "Two heads (of sheep) cannot fit in one pot." The implication is that there cannot be two leaders in one region at this level of multiple countries and personalities. Nazarbayev and Karimov, out of rivalry between the Soviet party nomenklatura, to which they both belonged, could not allow either of the other to rise. In the end, Moscow chose closer relations with Astana, which led to Tashkent withdrawing from the Collective Security Treaty Organization. Kazakh political scientist Maxim Kaznacheev has stated that this happened because Kazakhstan participated in various alliances, whilst Uzbekistan refused to do so, an indication that Tashkent had passed the sovereignty test, to the chagrin of Russia. "The ability of the government to pursue a sovereign policy should be put at the top of the list when determining a real regional leader. Uzbekistan has done better on this exam. Over the past decades, officially Tashkent has relied mainly on bilateral arrangements, avoiding active participation in multilateral integration formations," the political scientist stated. The Devil in the Details Despite these characteristics, Tashkent does not appear to have gained any advantages from this strategy, whether forced or chosen, due to a weak diplomatic corps. However, perhaps an Uzbek renaissance is yet to come. In late 2022, the Eurasian Development Bank published a report, "Central Asia's Economy: A New Look," which analyzed the prospects for interaction between Central Asian countries and the potential for the region to become a significant player in the world's economic map. According to this document, Kazakhstan remains the leading Central Asian economy, with its nominal 2021 GDP of $197.1 billion, 1.3 times the combined volume of the other four countries in the region. The report noted that by the end of 2022, Kazakhstan accounted for almost 60% of the total GDP of Central Asia. At the same time, GDP growth at the end of 2022 amounted to 3.2% compared to an average annual growth rate of 3.9% from 2010-2021. Uzbekistan is the next-largest economy in Central Asia after Kazakhstan, with a GDP of $69.2 billion in 2021, and $80.4 billion by the end of 2022. Although its nominal GDP is far smaller than Kazakhstan's, and its annual growth rate ($11 billion vs. $27 billion) does not seem to threaten Kazakhstan's...