• KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01172 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00211 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09391 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 7

Central Asian Countries and Azerbaijan Begin Military Exercises in Kazakhstan

On July 8, Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Defense announced the start of joint military exercises - 'Birlestik-2024' (Association-2024) - by Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan in the country’s Mangystau region. Until July 17, the states’ military contingents will be modelling and practicing a joint operation to localize an armed conflict in manoeuvres at both the Oimasha training ground and a Caspian Sea site two kilometers from Cape Tokmak. Some four thousand military personnel and up to 700 pieces of military equipment will be involved in the exercise. Tactical episodes will be played out with the participation of ground and air reconnaissance groups, naval special forces, army and front-line aviation crews, warships and boats, artillery crews, assault and tank units. In recent years, there has been talk about increasing military cooperation between Turkic-speaking countries. In November 2023, Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev called on leaders of Turkic states to strengthen defense cooperation and at a summit of the Organization of Turkic States (OTS) in Astana, Kazakhstan, stated: "Wars and bloody conflicts break out. In this case, the main guarantor of security, first of all, becomes the defense potential. I believe that cooperation between the member states in areas such as security, defense, and the defense industry should be further increased.” Member countries of the OTS, established in 2009, include Turkey, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan, while Hungary, Turkmenistan, and the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus have observer status.

Uzbekistan and Russia Discuss Rearmament of Republic’s Air Defense

Russia and Uzbekistan intend to sign an agreement on a program of arms modernization, including aviation, air defense, and ground forces. This was announced by the head of the Russian Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation Dmitry Shugaev, TASS reports. According to the speaker, the interaction between Russia and Uzbekistan within the framework of military-technical cooperation will touch upon air defense systems. “On the agenda is the conclusion of an agreement on the rearmament program. In any case, it will affect the air force air defense, and land equipment. A wide enough nomenclature - we will discuss, further develop, and help our colleagues,” the head of FSVTS said. Earlier, Uzbek president Shavkat Mirziyoyev signed a decree implying the creation of a state commission to equip the Armed Forces of the republic by March 2024. About 70,000 people serve in the army of Uzbekistan. The army has 28 brigades, 340 T-62, T-64, and T-72 tanks, and 530 armored vehicles (BMPs, APCs, BRDMs, as well as Turkish and Western Cougar, Ejder Yalcin, Maxxpro+, Typhoon). Defense spending has been steadily increasing, estimated at $797 million for the current year. Uzbekistan left the CSTO in 2012, so it relies on assistance not from Russia, but from Turkey and other foreign partners.

Central Asia’s Combined ‘Army of Turan’: Could a Hypothesis Become a Reality?

Kazakhstan will host the military exercise, "Birlestik-2024" in July of this year. Notably, this became known from the press service of the Ministry of Defense of Azerbaijan. The exercises will be jointly held by the Armed Forces of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. It is a convenient occasion to refresh the topic of the 'Army of Turan', which is periodically raised by experts both in Central Asia and neighboring countries. The Army of Turan is a hypothetical military bloc of Turkic-speaking countries. Its ideas have become relevant in the context of global geopolitical turbulence.   I hear the thunder of cannons... Most military analysts consider Azerbaijan to be Turkey's proxy in the South Caucasus. In general, Baku's rapprochement with the capitals of Turkic states (plus Dushanbe) meets Ankara's interests in creating a unified cultural and economic space: Turan. However, does the integration of Turkic states mean that they will eventually be able to create a NATO-style security pact in Central Asia? Such initiatives have resumed with renewed vigor after the end of the Azerbaijani-Armenian conflict, during which Turkey has shown the capability of its weapons. Indeed, in 2022, against the backdrop of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Kazakhstan - the only country of the participants to share a land border with the Russian Federation - pondered how to protect itself from further expansion of the northern empire's borders. But in the run-up to the summer of 2024, fears have mostly subsided. Many were sobered by the obvious fact that loud declarations of assistance from strong states at best mean the delivery of obsolete weapons, but no more. At worst, your offender will be censured from high podiums, and you will be sympathized with. For example, Turkey, the most likely to defend Central Asia from outsider aggression, did not risk helping the Palestinians, its brothers in faith, and got away with accusing Israel of fascism. So, the 'Army of Turan' exists in the heads of fantasists and pan-Turkics, but in reality, something ordinary is going on — the arms trade. Let's see what the armies of the Central Asian republics are armed with, excluding Turkmenistan, which has declared neutrality.   Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan The most troublesome neighbors in the region have not been able to complete their border delimitation process. As a result, quarrels periodically erupt, in which border guards from both sides intervene, staging mini-warfare. The cause of discord is usually the same: water. The Tajik and Kyrgyz militaries gain some combat experience in these micro-quarrels. Despite or based on this experience, Dushanbe relies on agreements with other countries -- Russia, China, India, Iran, and CSTO partners -- for its defense capability. Tajikistan's armed forces number only 9,000 men. They have 38 tanks (T-62 and T-72 modifications), 114 armored vehicles (APCs, BMPs, BRDMs), 40 artillery systems, and several short- and medium-range air defense units. The Air Force has four Czechoslovakian L-39 Albatross, combat trainers. Kyrgyzstan does not have much more power in the number of its troops, at around...

Agreement on Classified Military Information Signed between Uzbekistan and U.S.

The agreement “On the ratification of the agreement between the Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Uzbekistan and the U.S. Department of Defense on measures to protect classified military information” was approved, Platina.uz reports. This decision was made during a regular plenary session of the Senate of Uzbekistan. The 25-point agreement prepared by the Senate Committee on International Relations, Foreign Economic Relations, Foreign Investments and Tourism, was signed in Washington on June 9, 2023. According to the chairman of the Committee, Ravshanbek Alimov, the official visit of the President of Uzbekistan to the USA on May 15-17, 2018 was a strong impetus to the strategic development of Uzbekistan-U.S. relations. One of the important directions of partnership between the two countries is, of course, the military-technical partnership. In the discussion, it was noted that ratification of this agreement does not require any changes to the practical legislation of Uzbekistan or the allocation of additional funds from the budget.

Kazakh Military to Receive Transport Plane From Airbus

The world's largest aerospace company Airbus is preparing to deliver its first military transport aircraft to Kazakhstan. The A400M Atlas aircraft will be used by the Ministry of Defense. Airbus recently published a video on its website which shows how the aircraft has been painted for the Kazakh Ministry of Defense. The airliner will begin test flights in the near future. In 2021 Kazakhstan placed an order for a pair of four-engine military transport aircraft. It was subsequently reported that the country intends to use these airliners together with other vessels from the military fleet. Kazakhstan will become the ninth country to operate this type of aircraft -- and the first foreign customer since 2005.  The A400M is already in use in Turkey, Belgium, Germany, France, Spain, the United Kingdom, Malaysia and Luxembourg. The first of the two airplanes, bearing tail number MSN139 and service number 21, is intended to be delivered to the country by the end of this year. The second airliner is scheduled for delivery in 2025. The A400M can carry 116 fully equipped paratroopers and 37 tons of cargo at a time. It quickly transforms into a flying hospital with accommodations for 66 stretchers.

Kazakh Peacekeepers to be Sent to the Golan Heights

The Kazakh Defense Ministry has issued a report on the handing over of the United Nations’ flag to the peacekeeping contingent of Kazakhstan. The solemn ceremony took place on March 22nd at the Fawhar peacekeeping base, located in the area of responsibility of the UN mission on the Golan Heights between Israel and Syria. After the head of the Irish contingent, Lieutenant Colonel Oliver Clear, had handed over the UN flag to the commander of the Kazakh contingent, Lieutenant Colonel Zhiger Aipov, the latter commented: “Since the transfer of the UN flag, our unit has become a full participant in the mission in the Golan Heights and we have now begun to carry out the assigned tasks.” This is the first time in Kazakhstan’s history that the UN has given the country a mandate to carry out an independent peacekeeping mission. During the year, the Kazakh peacekeeping contingent will patrol the area, strengthen checkpoints, maintain ceasefire between warring parties, and perform other tasks in accordance with the mandate of the UN mission. Peacekeepers from Kazakhstan have undergone thorough selection and training in accordance with the UN’s requirements and standards and according to Kazakh Defense Minister Ruslan Zhaksylykov, 139 servicemen are ready to be to be sent to the Golan Heights.