• KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 239

American Travels to Kazakhstan to Seek Information on Father’s Fate in 1940s

Since 2022, U.S. citizen Jeff Scheingold has been looking for any information about his close relatives who fled to Kazakhstan to escape the Nazis. Kazakhstani police officers helped him find out about the fate of his father, mother and brother. Scheingold asked the Kyzylorda Region Police Department to find information about his family. His parents and brother were Polish Jews who lived in the Terenozek district of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic (KazSSR) after feeling into the Soviet Union from Poland to escape the Nazis. In 1943, during Stalinist repressions that were particularly acute for war refugees who had come from abroad, his father was arrested. "In 2022, I found out that my parents lived in Kazakhstan during the Great Patriotic War. They escaped from the Nazis from Poland. We didn't have any more information, except for the protocol of the court. As a result of our searches, we found documents that had been kept in the archive for almost 80 years. They concerned my parents and my brother  who are buried in aul (village) Number 6," said Scheingold. According to the Scheingold, he has now reconstructed the details of his blood relatives' lives from 1942 to 1946, with members of the Scheingold family traveling to Kyzylorda to visit the burial site of his brother. According to the Kazakh Ministry of Internal Affairs, more than 30,000 documents have been kept in the archive of the regional police. These documents are very important for thousands of people looking for information about the fate of relatives - as well as for scientists, journalists, and historians - to fully reconstruct and understand historical events using first-hand information.

First Kazakh Kindergarten Has Opened in California’s Silicon Valley

The first Kazakh kindergarten in the U.S. has opened in the state of California, and its a project developed and operated by natives of Kazakhstan. The main purpose of the educational center is to work for the preservation of national culture abroad, reports the news site 24.KZ. The idea to create a kindergarten replete with Kazakh-language instruction education came to Zhanna Atabekova. According to her, through the new school, citizens of Kazakhstan who live and work in Silicon Valley can now instill national values in their children. "We want our child to receive the same upbringing as if he or she was raised by grandparents. This kindergarten is important to preserve our language," parents stated. Earlier, President Kasym-Jomart Tokayev spoke out on the issue of a national language policy, expressing confidence that Kazakh would become the main language of inter-ethnic communication. At the end of last year, Kazakhstan's Ministry of Labor and Social Protection reported on its efforts to open education and training centers to help prepare Kazakhs for work abroad. According to official data, more than 194,000 citizens currently work abroad: 162,700 in Russia, 13,100 in Poland, 6,000 in South Korea, and 5,000 in Britain.

American Company Launches CO2 Production in Uzbekistan

The American company Air Products is planning to open a carbon dioxide (CO2) production project in Uzbekistan. The corresponding agreement, worth $15 million, was signed with Navoi Nitrogen (Navoiazot) chemical complex. The plant will be the first and so far the only one of its kind in Uzbekistan, and will use untreated CO2 captured at the ammonia production line. Production of high-purity carbon dioxide will allow its use in beverage production, food packaging, welding mixtures, for blast freezing of food products, the agro-industrial complex, greenhouses, water purification, dry ice production, and more. The plant, which will have a capacity of 120 tons of CO2 per day, will reduce the consumption of natural gas, which is currently the main source of CO2 generation. "Using CO2 in greenhouses allows farmers to harvest 20-40 percent more crops. For example, in Holland and Spain, 60 percent to 90 percent of greenhouses use carbon dioxide to enrich the atmosphere. Uzbekistan's agriculture has great potential, and competent use of CO2 will allow it to achieve excellent results," believes Kirill Korotkov, commercial director for Air Products Uzbekistan. Air Products began operations in Uzbekistan in 2019, and to date has implemented a number of projects in the oil & gas and chemical industries. In September 2023, during a working visit of Uzbek president Shavkat Mirziyoyev to New York, he met with Air Products's chairman Seifi Ghasemi. The parties considered the expansion of their strategic partnership -- with investments totaling up to $1 billion.

U.S. to Restrict Firearms Exports to Central Asian Countries

From the end of May the U.S. will restrict exports of all firearms to non-government entities in high-risk countries, including Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan, according to a statement from the U.S. Department of Commerce. According to the statement, the Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has issued a regulation “amending the Department’s licensing policy for exports of firearms, ammunition, and related components under its jurisdiction.” The decision concerns export to non-governmental organizations. Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan are among 36 countries included on the list of high-risk nations. As part of the new changes to the regulations, the administration is also shortening the validity period of arms export licenses to one year from four years. The changes are aimed at reducing the risk of increasing instability in the regions of the world through the illicit use of American weapons.  

U.S. Government Discusses Data From Air Quality Monitor at Tashkent Embassy

On April 22, a press conference was held at the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan with American air quality specialist and researcher Jay Turner speaking to media representatives about the air quality monitoring device installed at the embassy in Tashkent in 2018. According to Turner, the device monitors the concentration of air particles every hour: data is taken every 53 minutes, the remaining seven minutes are spent analyzing it, and the results are compared to the previous hour. Devices recently installed by Uzhydromet also monitor air quality hourly, and their data is roughly similar to that recorded at the U.S. Embassy. However, there are aspects that should be taken into account when comparing the results, says Turner. “It is required to follow certain protocols during the monitoring process. The equipment at the embassy follows these protocols, which I have checked myself. If we assume that Uzhydromet follows these protocols and submits its reports, it can be said that it will be the same as our data,” he said. Turner mentioned that work is currently underway to determine the differences between the monitoring devices. “To find an answer to this question, the U.S. State Department has allocated grant funds to Duke University and plans to install inexpensive air quality monitoring sensors throughout Tashkent. A portion of them has already been installed,” he stated.

Kyrgyzstan and U.S. Review Political, Security and Economic Cooperation

On April 22 Bishkek hosted Annual Bilateral Consultations led by the Deputy Foreign Minister of the Kyrgyz Republic Aibek Moldogaziev and U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs John Mark Pommersheim. Referencing the historic C5+1 Summit held on September 22, 2023 in New York, the parties commended its positive impact on regional cooperation and the U.S.-Kyrgyzstan commitment to enhancing U.S.-Central Asia regional partnership. Deputy Foreign Minister Moldogaziev and Deputy Assistant Secretary Pommersheim reaffirmed the importance of annual bilateral consultations in advancing shared priorities, including political and security cooperation, economic partnership and support for civil society and rule of law. Under security cooperation, discussions focused on counterterrorism, border protection, global health security, and continued defense cooperation, with the United States reiterating its unwavering support for Kyrgyzstan’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, and independence. Both sides emphasized their commitment to grow and diversify the Kyrgyz economy, increase U.S. private sector investment, improve regional connectivity and trade, expand agricultural cooperation, and advance partnership on critical minerals and the green economy. Collaboration on the continued commitment to addressing social issues included furthering economic opportunities for persons with disabilities, and measures to protect public health. Looking towards the realization of creating a resilient, prosperous, and secure Kyrgyzstan, delegates listed media freedom, a strong civil society, respect for human rights -including women’s rights- stronger protection against gender-based violence, judicial independence, and combating corruption, as essential. The parties also discussed the importance of continuing to increase cooperation through educational and English language programmes, emphasizing the important role of direct personal interaction in the countries’ bilateral relationship.

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