• KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01150 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00222 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09386 0.64%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 5

Turkey Lifts Restrictions on Import of Livestock and Poultry Products from Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Agriculture has announced that from June 7, 2024, restrictions on the supply of Kazakh livestock and poultry products to the Turkish market have been lifted. The restrictions were originally made to prevent the spread of avian influenza, in 2005, foot-and-mouth disease, in 2016, and lumpy skin disease, in 2022. In March 2024, the Minister of Agriculture of Kazakhstan, Aidarbek Saparov, raised the issue of export barriers during the meeting of ministers of agriculture of the Organization of Turkic States in Taraz, Kazakhstan. At the time, Saparov explained that Kazakhstan was ready to supply high-quality meat products to Turkey as well as Turkmenistan and Hungary, but complained that the Turkish market was all but closed to Kazakh meat exporters due to veterinary concerns. Pleading his case, he continued, “This year, similar restrictions on Kazakhstan have been lifted by China and Russia. So, we believe it is now possible to revisit this issue with the Turkish side.” With the restrictions now lifted, the next step towards exporting Kazakhstan’s livestock products will involve the coordination of veterinary requirements with Turkish authorities. The issue will be addressed during Minister Saparov’s next visit to Turkey in August.  

Uzbekistan to Increase Production and Export of Medicines

Uzbekistan President Shavkat Mirziyoyev called a government meeting  on 23 May to review plans for the country’s pharmaceutical industry. On 10 January, a road map for 2024–2025 was approved for the development of the pharmaceutical industry and the acceleration of related investment projects. This was followed by a presidential decree of 23 January which identified additional measures required to regulate the pharmaceutical sector. To date, a budget of $100 million has been allocated for the realization of new projects in the industry, boosted by an injection of $200 million from Asakabank. As a result, two projects worth $30.5 million have been launched over the past four months, with exports totalling $51 million. However, a lot of potential remains untapped. To redress the balance, plans are now underway to produce pharmaceutical products worth $400 million and increase the exports to $200 million.  A total of 147 projects worth $2 billion will be launched this year alongside the commission of a further 28. The head of state emphasized the need to increase the level of domestically produced medicines available in Uzbekistan and to ensure a balance between price and quality. The meeting also reviewed measures to intensify the work of the innovative pharmaceutical cluster, Tashkent Pharma Park, by launching 12 projects worth $470 million.  

UNDP Supports Export Promotion Center in Kyrgyzstan

A much welcomed export development and promotion center has been launched in Kyrgyzstan with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). According to a report by the UNDP in Kyrgyzstan on May 7, the key aim of the Kyrgyz Export Center is to offer advice and equip Kyrgyz companies with skills and knowledge to navigate and succeed in international trade. Local businesses  are promised access to a wide range of beneficial services  including the provision of data and analysis of potential international markets and step-by-step guidance in entering foreign markets. Help will also be available to enable companies to fully exploit their export potential through programs tailored to maximize growth and competitiveness. In addition, local companies will be encouraged and offered support to participate in trade missions and international exhibitions through which they can showcase their products to a global audience. Emphasizing the organization’s commitment to best international practices, Urmat Takirov, director of the Kyrgyz Export Center, stated, “We strive to apply the best practices and approaches adopted in international business to ensure the best results in the development of export-oriented companies in Kyrgyzstan.”

Uzbekistan Expands Basalt Production

On April 8, President Shavkat Mirziyoyev visited the Basalt Uzbekistan cluster in the Jizzakh region. Seven years has passed since the region began extracting basalt and today, the cluster processes 177 thousand tons of stone per year and manufactures 42 different products. In addition to basalt wool and fibre, local enterprises employ technology from Germany, France, Italy, and the Czech Republic, to provide mesh and reinforcement and insulation materials for the construction industry. In 2023, 80% of the 45 thousand tons of goods produced, were exported to the USA, Great Britain, Poland, Italy, the Czech Republic, Georgia, Russia, Turkey, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan. Six major projects worth $498 million and employing 1.7 thousand currently operate across 300 hectares in the region. Due to be launched next year with imported equipment valued at $145 million, a new enterprise will produce 25 thousand tons of basalt fiber and fabric per annum, 90% of which is destined for export. The president has now set the task for the instigation of further plants with investments of $500 million to manufacture 20 types of products and create two thousand new jobs.

Potential Impact of EU Carbon Tax on Kazakhstan’s Industries

From 2026, transboundary carbon regulations will be imposed on European Union countries. The introduction of a new EU carbon tax will also affect export of products from Kazakhstan . After the transition period, which began on January 1st 2024 and will run until the end of 2026, payment will be increased on emissions. Following discussions at a seminar for Kazakhstan’s industrial exporters on March 15th, the Kazakh Ministry of Trade and Integration reported that the new legislation will affect six industrial sectors including the production of ferrous metals and aluminum, cement, fertilizers, hydrogen, and electricity. Nurlan Kulbatyrov, Deputy Director General of QazTrade JSC stated that since Kazakhstan has an Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement with the EU, the country will be impacted by both the EU Green Deal and carbon border adjustment tax. To prepare for the changes, he reported that since last year, QazTrade, in collaboration with the Ministry of Trade and Integration, has been conducting awareness-raising activities on carbon taxation for export-oriented companies. An expert from the European Commission explained that cross-border regulation will mainly affect sectors associated with iron, steel and aluminum, which accounted for between 0.8 - 0.9% of Kazakhstan's total exports to the EU in 2022. EU countries currently account for 39% of Kazakhstan's exports, including oil, petroleum products, ferroalloys, coal, uranium and wheat. In 2023, Kazakhstan exported goods valued at $41.4 billion to the EU, including $388 million worth of carbon-intensive products. In the first phase, industrial enterprises will be required to submit quarterly reports to the European Commission comprising data on export volumes, greenhouse gas emissions connected to production and quotas used. After 2025, carbon regulation will come into force, and free quotas gradually levelled out. Charges will initially target direct emissions, but could later be extended to other sectors with risks of carbon leakage, such as oil refineries and chemical plants. Ainur Amirbekova, Director of the International Integration Department of QazTrade JSC, added that the introduction of a carbon tax by EU countries will inevitably affect the cost of Kazakhstan’s exports, and thus heighten competition. Since rising prices could potentially close markets for particular goods, Kazakh enterprises have been forewarned to address both decarbonization and the transition to alternative technologies as soon as possible.

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