• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 246

Kazakhstan Aligns with UN Practice, Lifts Ban on Taliban

Kazakhstan, located 1,566 km from the Afghanistan border, has announced the removal of the Taliban from its list of proscribed organizations. Aibek Smadiyarov, Spokesperson for the Kazakh Foreign Ministry, declared this policy shift, signifying a significant change in Kazakhstan's approach towards the Taliban. Smadiyarov stated that this decision aligns with Kazakhstan's regular update of its national list of terrorist organizations, ensuring consistency with international standards and practices. The United Nations (UN) does not include the Taliban in the list of organizations recognized as terrorist by the UN Security Council. "These resolutions are binding, and we adhere to them," affirmed Smadiyarov, underscoring Kazakhstan's commitment to follow international norms set by the UN. Originating in 1986-1987, the Taliban - a group labeled as a terrorist organization by numerous countries worldwide - ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001 and returned to power in 2021 following the withdrawal of U.S. troops. The group is now striving to establish diplomatic relationships with various countries, including Kazakhstan. European countries have varied responses towards the Taliban. While no European nation has officially recognized the Taliban government, some degree of interaction has been initiated due to humanitarian and regional security concerns. For instance, the European Union has engaged in dialogue with the Taliban to address immediate humanitarian issues and evacuation efforts. Similarly, countries like Germany and Norway have been part of diplomatic negotiations with the Taliban, each guided by their respective foreign policies and national security considerations. The United States has also begun engaging with the Taliban albeit in a complex manner. Despite the Doha Agreement leading to the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan and outlining commitments from both parties, it did not equate to formal recognition of the Taliban government. The U.S.'s approach, termed 'pragmatic engagement', emphasizes that Afghanistan's future hinges on mutual engagement between the Taliban and the international community. However, there remains global apprehension about the Taliban's policies, particularly concerning women's rights and education. The Taliban has been widely criticized for its harsh treatment of women and girls, including banning girls from receiving secondary education. Many international entities continue to condemn the Taliban's actions and demand an end to human rights abuses. Kazakhstan, being a secular nation, is naturally concerned about the oppressive ideology of the Taliban, especially its potential ramifications on women. The recent decision to remove the Taliban from its list of banned organizations highlights the complex geopolitical challenges Kazakhstan faces. It also demonstrates Kazakhstan’s commitment to aligning with the United Nations charter and the positions of its respective organs.  

The Geopolitical Fallout of Taliban’s Takeover: Neighboring Countries and Their Responses

The swift takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban following the withdrawal of foreign forces (notably the United States) has created a complex geopolitical situation for neighboring countries. These nations had contemplated the prospect of a Taliban resurgence, but the sudden shift in power dynamics forced them to publicly acknowledge their stance towards a Taliban-led Afghanistan. The General Response In general, the consensus among these nations has been an acceptance of the new reality, with many expressing a willingness to engage in dialogue with Afghanistan's new leadership. While the two regional heavyweights, Moscow and Beijing, have both indicated their readiness to negotiate with the Taliban, they harbor concerns about militants from their own countries that are currently in Afghanistan and allied with the Taliban. The safety of foreign citizens still residing in Afghanistan further complicates the situation. Pakistan, a long-standing supporter of the Taliban, openly welcomed the group's recent success. Meanwhile, China, Iran, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan choose to concede their lack of influence over Afghan internal politics, instead expressing hope for potential cooperation with the Taliban. Tajikistan's Unique Stance Tajikistan, under the leadership of President Emomali Rahmon, presents a different narrative. Rahmon has been vocal in his opposition to the Taliban government in Afghanistan. This stance is partly due to his history as Tajikistan's leader during the previous Taliban control of Afghanistan and his support for ethnic Tajiks there who have been battling the Taliban. Tajiks constitute approximately 25% of the Afghan population, and their connection to Tajiks in Tajikistan is strong. None of the other neighboring states have this sort of relationship. Rahmon's concern for the Afghan Tajiks has earned him rare public support at home, which could be crucial as he prepares his son, Rustam, to succeed him as president. There appears to be a growing concern among Tajikistan's citizens about the potential illiberal influence of the Taliban. Following the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, Tajikistan received thousands of refugees, with many more gathering at the border. This influx could indicate a fear of Taliban's rule among the population. There are also reports of Taliban attacks on Tajik communities. The Taliban enforces justice through its strict interpretation of Sharia law, including the implementation of criminal punishments such as public executions. Judges within the Taliban enforce the hierarchy and maintain centralized authority. This system has been criticized by human rights organizations for lacking justice, truth and reparation for crimes under international law as well as for human rights violations. Challenges Ahead Rahmon faces significant challenges in engaging with the Taliban due to the country's history with the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan (IRPT). The IRPT, an Islamic political party far more moderate than the Taliban, was a major opposition group during Tajikistan's 1992-1997 civil war. It later became the second-largest party in Tajikistan, posing a threat to Rahmon's power. In 2015, the Tajik government banned the IRPT, labeling it an extremist group based on claims of a coup attempt. Given this history, it's hard for the Tajik government to establish ties with...

The Threat of Taliban to Democracy in Tajikistan: An Intensifying Crisis

Tajikistan is in an increasingly precarious position due to the resurgent Taliban regime in neighboring Afghanistan. Unlike its regional counterparts, Tajikistan stands firm in its refusal to engage with the Taliban, highlighting its unique stance in the geopolitical landscape. The Taliban's swift takeover of Afghanistan has raised alarm bells in Tajikistan, with the government intensifying its criticism of the extremist group. The increasing complexity of threats posed by the Taliban and cross-border attacks by Islamic State affiliates have left leaders grappling for security solutions. There has been an uneasy truce along the Afghanistan's border with its Central Asian neighbors in the months after the Taliban seized control. However, the emergence of a new Taliban-affiliated group, Tehrik-e-Taliban Tajikistan, signals a heightened threat to Tajikistan's national security. This precarious situation is further complicated by the fact that Tajikistan's land border with Afghanistan has been closed since the Taliban takeover in 2021. This has restricted travel and trade between the two nations, adding economic pressure to the already tense standoff. In addition to the immediate threat that the Taliban poses, there are also fears about extremist groups using Afghanistan as a base for conducting terrorist activities. This has sparked terror fears in Central Asia, including in Tajikistan. While the international community has adopted a wait-and-see approach towards the Taliban, Tajikistan has taken a sharply and openly critical stance. This could potentially isolate the nation further and put its democratic principles under strain. It is clear that the threat Taliban poses to Tajikistan's democracy continues to be multi-faceted and is escalating. Ever since the Taliban came to power in Afghanistan in 2021, Tajikistan has been under an increased threat of terrorist attacks. The question remains whether these incursions into Tajikistan were real or staged, but there exists a real threat to the nation's security and democracy. The country's refusal to engage with the Taliban, coupled with the emergence of new extremist groups and the potential for Afghanistan to become a hub for terrorism, continue to pose a significant challenge to Tajikistan's democratic values and national security.

During surprise visit to Afghanistan, Trump says Taliban talks resumed

KABUL (TCA) — President Donald Trump has said the United States has resumed talks with the Taliban as he made an unannounced Thanksgiving visit to U.S. troops in Afghanistan — his first to the war-torn country since taking office in 2017, RFE/RL reported. Continue reading

Afghanistan: US, Taliban holding unofficial talks in Doha

KABUL (TCA) — Discussion between the US and Taliban has begun again in Qatar, but in an unofficial capacity, Afghan broadcaster TOLOnews reported on November 24 citing two sources familiar with the matter. Continue reading

Pakistan views Afghanistan’s Taliban as ‘relatively friendly’ — US report

KABUL (TCA) — Pakistan continues to view the Afghan Taliban as "a relatively friendly and reliably anti-India element in Afghanistan", according to a US Congressional Research Service report titled “Afghanistan: Background and US Policy in Brief”, Afghan broadcaster TOLOnews reported. Continue reading

Start typing to see posts you are looking for.