• KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09392 -0.63%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 74

Central Asian Countries Gather to Share Air Pollution Solutions

On June 19th a political and regional forum was organized in Tashkent under the slogan “Building a Clean Air Future in Central Asia”. The forum was organized in partnership with the Uzbek Ministry of Ecology, the World Bank, and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP). Participants included senior officials from the governments of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The forum was created to allow the countries of Central Asia to exchange knowledge on how to prevent air pollution. Air quality in both urban and rural areas is affected by transboundary pollution, caused by emissions from burning fossil fuels in industry, the heating sector, and transport. Another source of pollution in cities is sand and dust storms. Most air quality-related illnesses and premature deaths in Central Asia are attributable to delicate particulate matter 2.5 microns or less in diameter (PM2.5). Their concentration in large cities is often several times higher than the permissible air quality parameters recommended by the World Health Organization. This is especially noticeable during winter, when the heating sector uses coal and gas for power. According to the IQAir portal, which monitors global air quality, Central Asian cities are often among the most polluted cities in the world. The participants at “Building a Clean Air Future in Central Asia” studied each other's measures and practices in air quality management. They then defined some priority directions for accelerating regional cooperation on these issues. Valerie Hickey, the World Bank's global director for environment, natural resources and the blue economy, commented: “Air quality management is a complex challenge that requires understanding where the pollution comes from and prioritizing actions in those sectors. This will take better data and stronger regulations harmonized across borders, credible institutions, and clean infrastructure. Working together, the countries can clean the air across Central Asia.” Sylvie Motar, deputy director of the European office of the UNEP, added: “Air pollution knows no borders, so cooperation between Central Asian countries in this area is essential. This dialogue will help increase investments in clean air to protect the health of the people of Central Asia.”

UN Supports Uzbekistan and China’s Initiative on International Day of Dialogue Among Civilizations.

The UN General Assembly has unanimously adopted a resolution entitled “International Day of Dialogue among Civilizations,” which was drafted by the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Uzbekistan. The main goal of the resolution is to raise awareness of the value of civilizations' diversity and promote dialogue, mutual respect, and global solidarity, states the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Uzbekistan According to the resolution, June 10th will be declared the International Day of Dialogue among Civilizations. More than 80 countries co-sponsored the resolution, including all of the Central Asian states, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, and Russia. The resolution reflects the ideas proposed by the leadership of Uzbekistan at the 78th session of the UN General Assembly in 2023 and the Samarkand SCO summit in 2022. The document stresses the need to promote solidarity for common security and prosperity, strive for constructive cooperation, and mobilize the international community's efforts to achieve peace and sustainable development. The resolution also highlights the contribution of all cultures and civilizations to enriching humanity and recognizes the importance of religious and cultural diversity. The document encourages tolerance, respect, dialogue, and cooperation among different cultures and civilizations.

Central Asia Asks: Are Afghanistan’s Taliban Government Terrorists?

On June 3, Kazakhstani President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev met with speakers of CSTO countries’ parliaments, who were in Almaty for a meeting of the Council of the CSTO Parliamentary Assembly. At this event, Tokayev separately touched upon the situation in Afghanistan. In his view, one of the strategic tasks at this point is actively linking Afghanistan with the region. Tokayev recalled that “Kazakhstan had removed the Taliban regime from its list of terrorist organizations, basing this decision on the importance of developing trade and economic cooperation with today’s Afghanistan and the understanding that this regime is a long-term factor.” The last bit, namely that “Kazakhstan had removed the Taliban regime from its list of terrorist organizations,” was presented by many foreign media, probably due to its simplicity, as something that had just happened. For example, the Russian-language service of Deutsche Welle reported that “the Kazakh authorities have decided to exclude the Taliban movement from the list of terrorist organizations.” Similar stories were carried by various other news media, like RFE/RL’s Kazakh service, 24.kg and Amu TV, among others. However, some publications objectively covered Tokayev’s statement. For example, The Diplomat reported that “Tokayev explained his government’s decision in more detail,” while Sputnik India wrote that "Tokayev explained Almaty's decision in December to drop the group from the list.” Asia-Plus ran a similar story. Given all the noise, it would be useful to clarify the situation for readers. The decision to exclude the Taliban from the list of banned foreign organizations was made by Kazakhstan’s Supreme Court on December 20, 2023, almost six months ago. The Taliban had been put on the list in March 2005. At that time, they were actively fighting the NATO-led international coalition, which had launched the so-called Operation Enduring Freedom in October 2001 in response to the 9/11 terrorist attack. The Kazakhstani Foreign Ministry cited UN decisions to back up its move to take the Taliban off the terrorist list. Foreign Ministry spokesperson Aibek Smadiyarov said that “according to UN Security Council resolutions, which are binding, the Taliban movement is not included in the lists of terrorist organizations recognized as such by the UN Security Council.” As expected, at the time the reaction was mixed. Most of the negative commentary presented it as recognition of the Taliban regime, which, in fact, is not true – it was not a unilateral act of Kazakhstan giving international legal recognition to the Taliban. Meanwhile, another trend in the coverage of Tokayev’s recent remarks was to link Kazakhstan’s decision to remove the Taliban from its terrorist list with Russian plans to do the same. On May 27, the Russian Foreign Ministry and Justice Ministry reported to President Vladimir Putin that the Taliban movement could be excluded from the list of organizations banned in the country. Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov remarked that this proposal “reflects a realization of reality,” adding that “[the Taliban] are the real government. We [and] our allies, especially in Central Asia, are not indifferent to Afghanistan.” In his own...

Uzbekistan Representative Elected to UN Human Rights Committee for First Time

Academician Akmal Saidov, director of the National Center for Human Rights in Uzbekistan, has been elected as a member of the UN Human Rights Committee for the 2025-2028 term. Uzbekistan is the first Central Asian country to join this key UN committee. The election took place on May 29 at the United Nations headquarters in New York, during the 40th session of the member states of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Nine members were elected to the Human Rights Committee for the 2025-2028 term. In addition to Uzbekistan, candidates from 16 other countries vied for the nine available seats. In the secret ballot, Saidov received the most votes from the member states of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The Human Rights Committee is a UN body composed of independent experts who monitor the implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights by its member states. There are 173 countries in this pact, which Uzbekistan joined in 1995. The committee's role is to ensure that civil and political rights are fully respected.

Kazakhstan Joins UN Crime Prevention Commission for First Time

The 33rd session of the UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (CCPCJ) was held in Vienna. According to the press service of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kazakhstan has been elected for the first time to the CPPUC for the period from 2025 to 2027 and "is ready to make its practical contribution to the work of the commission, taking into account the accumulated national experience in crime prevention and criminal justice." The permanent representative of Kazakhstan to international organizations in Vienna, Mukhtar Tleuberdi informed the participants of the session about the latest reforms in law enforcement agencies of Kazakhstan, the development of the penitentiary system to bring it closer to international standards, including reducing the number of prisoners, rehabilitation, reintegration of citizens returning from conflict zones, as well as reducing the level of re-offenders. The Kazakh delegation also stressed the importance of developing international cooperation on preventing and combating organized crime, corruption, terrorism, and other criminal activities. "Mukhtar Tleuberdi emphasized the contribution of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and donor countries in the implementation of these tasks, assuring the further support of Kazakhstan to the activities of UNODC, including through the allocation of voluntary contributions to the Global Program against Cybercrime,", stated the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

UN Special Rapporteurs Denounce Repressions of Independent Media in Kyrgyzstan

A number of UN Special Rapporteurs have denounced the repression of independent media in Kyrgyzstan and sent a letter to the authorities of the country. In the letter, they mentioned recent events related to the publications Kloop, 24.kg and Temirov Live, Vesti.kg  reports. The UN Special Rapporteurs called on the Kyrgyz authorities to fully respect international norms and standards regarding freedom of expression. "We are concerned that attacks on independent journalists and news outlets appear to be a direct result of their independent journalistic investigations. We are concerned that independent media and human rights defenders are worried that they will not be able to exercise their rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, and associations to do their legitimate work without intimidation or reprisal," the letter states. The authors of the letter also ask the Kyrgyz authorities to provide detailed information on the charges against Kloop, 24.kg and Temirov Live. Earlier TCA reported that evidence regarding the case of 11 current and former journalists of Temirov Live, arrested on charges of calling for mass riots, were transferred to the court and will soon be handed over to the judge.

Start typing to see posts you are looking for.