• KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 42

Turkmenistan President’s Visit Causes Havoc in Dashoguz

According to reports published by Turkmen.news, traffic was restricted in the Dashoguz region from June 2nd due to President Serdar Berdimuhamedov's arrival to open new power plants. The head of state came to the region on June 5th, but residents endured inconvenience for three days due to safety precautions. The restrictions also affected pedestrians. On the eve of the president’s visit, houses were painted, and extra police officers were placed on duty. As stated in the report, “From June 2nd, access to Tashkhovuz from distant districts was closed. On June 3rd, the ban also affected the residents of the areas directly adjacent to the city. No one was allowed into the regional center: it doesn’t matter if a person works there, studies, or needs treatment.” Also, residents' cars in the regional center were only allowed on the road if they were painted white and were manufactured after 2015. Pedestrians were forbidden to walk freely; on June 3rd, police officers from all etraps (territorial units) were called onto duty in Dashoguz and placed at posts on central roads every hundred meters. This lasted from 6 am until 10 pm. All houses facing the main road, where the presidential motorcade passed, were hastily painted white or covered with whitewash. The work was carried out very carelessly, with no one protecting windows and doors from paint, and traces of paint were left smeared on the ground.

Residents of Turkmenistan Urged Not to Disseminate What’s Happening in the Country

In the city of Turkmenbashi, local authorities, including the khakimlik (mayor's office), the National Security Ministry (NSM), the court, the police, and elders, are holding meetings with youth and cultural workers. At these meetings, they are warned not to disseminate information about events in the country, such as natural disasters and traffic accidents, on the internet or to journalists. The meetings are hosted mainly by elders who reprimand the youth. “They demanded not to share pictures and videos of someone asking for money for a sick child and not to write comments under posts about problems,” a cultural worker said during an anonymous conversation. Meeting participants claim that the elders said, “There are no countries without faults, and faults need to be hidden.” They also emphasized that freedom on the internet should not lead to the spread of negative information. Authorities stated that citizens who distributed videos about the Ashgabat floods have already been identified, and most were cultural workers. "Cultural workers are lighthearted, and all the videos and information leaking online are mostly what you're doing. All problems come either from singers or actors, and the people following them,” a cultural worker was quoted as saying by an NSM official. The elders and representatives of the khakimlik also urged parents to monitor how their children use the internet and what sites they visit and read. Participants in the meeting were required to use VPN programs approved by the authorities and only share positive photos, videos, and messages about the country online.

Turkmenistan to Ditch Forced Labor in Cotton Harvesting

According to reports  published by Turkmen.news, the government of Turkmenistan and the International Labor Organization (ILO) have adopted a roadmap for cooperation for 2024-2025, The document details specific steps to prevent the use of forced labor by adults and children during the cotton harvest. It also provides mechanisms for hired labourers to lodge  complaints regarding coercion or extortion, and sets a minimum wage for pickers. If  all of the conditions and measures outlined in the roadmap are implemented,  significant progress will be made towards eradicating forced labor in Turkmenistan.  The key aim is the legislation of a  presidential decree on measures for organized cotton harvesting to eliminate the use of forced or compulsory  labor. It is expected that a system of prohibitions and penalties will be introduced regarding the  practice of forced mobilization or extortion.  The roadmap stresses the need for a simple and easily accessible  means whereby complaints of coercion can be anonymously filed to prevent officials  retaliating against the complainant. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Supreme Court, the Prosecutor General's Office, the Interior Ministry, the Ministry of Justice, the Ombudsman Institute, and the Ministry of Labor and Social Security are tasked with developing the document's recommendations. “Overall, if the measures in the roadmap are implemented, it will be a big step forward. Although the government has not publicly recognized the problem, such a detailed plan is encouraging,” said Ruslan Myatiev, editor of Turkmen.news.

Turkmenistan Hosts European Exhibition on Energy-Saving

An ambitious and multi-faceted  traveling exhibition “Transition to Renewable Energy Sources—Energy of the Future” has just opened at the Technology Center of the Academy of Sciences of Turkmenistan. As reported by “Turkmenistan: Golden Age”, the exhibition, curated by  the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ), presents the various means and  measures developed by European countries to save energy. Divided into five sections, the exhibition provides a hands-on exploration of energy efficiency practices through interactive touch panels and  by immersing themselves in virtual reality, visitors can envisage the world in the future. The exhibition highlights the multilevel aspects, challenges, and potential of the global energy transition from society, politics, economics, and science perspectives, and during its tour, aims to encourage widespread dialogue and an exchange of knowledge and views on decarbonization and global energy transition. Regarding the tour,  project manager Yasmine Deren, stated, “This exhibition started three years ago and has already visited Europe, Asia, the Gulf States and in Central Asia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. We are happy that the exhibition is now being shown in Ashgabat,  Turkmenistan and afterwards, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan." The exhibition will be displayed Monday - Saturday in Ashgabat until 25 June and thereafter, in Turkmenistan's city of Mary.

Turkmenistan Restricts Women From Obtaining Driving Licenses

It is becoming more and more difficult for women to drive in Turkmenistan, with requirements for obtaining a driver's license often oppressively strict. Turkmenistan has restricted women's rights for many years, including their freedom to drive a car. In 2017 Turkmen police began revoking women's driving licenses and refusing to issue them with new ones. From the beginning of 2023 women had to be over the age of 41 to learn to drive, and even then driving schools would only accept them if they provided marriage certificates and character references. It is reported that in the country's Mary region it is now almost impossible for women to drive a car. Women who already have a license can only renew it when it expires if they have a vehicle registered in their name. “Often, the cars driven by women are not registered in their name, and they use vehicles registered in the name of their brothers or husbands by power of attorney. Now they have to transfer the cars to their name or buy a new car to get a driver's license; otherwise, they will not be issued a new document,” Radio Azatlyk wrote. According to local sources, police officers are refusing to issue licenses to women under the age of 35. One resident added: “You also need a medical certificate from a psychiatric dispensary to renew your license. They are obtained in local medical institutions. The cost of renewing a driver's license will cost 200 to 400 manats ($57-$114). Mary residents said using a bribe is the easiest way to solve the problem. “Men can get a driver's license by paying a bribe of 4,000 manat ($1141), while a woman will have to pay 6,000 to 7,000 manat ($1712 to $1997),” the resident said. Turkmen officials deny any discrimination against women, and maintain that gender equality is fully respected in the country.

Turkmenistan Residents Detained for Public Displays of Affection

Police in Turkmenistan have detained couples for holding hands, sitting close together, and public displays of affection. A young married couple in Turkmenabat, witnessed cuddling in a parked car, were horrified when a policeman threatened to detain them for “undermining moral values.” In his defence, the man said, “I hugged my wife to calm her down. She was crying as we were discussing where to get enough money for essential medicines." Describing what had ensued, he said that the policeman had demanded to see both their passports and marriage certificates. However, after receiving verification that they were married, the policeman continued to harass them in hope of a bribe. The case is not unusual and in recent weeks, Turkmenabat, the administrative center of the Lepab province, has received reports of many similar incidents in which the city's police have seen fit to reprimand  couples who hold hands, sit beside each other, kiss, or hug in public places. Although public  displays of affection are not banned in Turkmenistan, the police in the country's regions, including the capital Ashgabat and Mary province, have detained young men and women in parks and on the streets for violating “social norms.” In the worst case scenario, "violators” in Mary were handcuffed and forced to attend lectures on moral values at the local police station. Residents say that restrictions imposed in Turkmenabat  since April, have created a backlash of complaints from  local students and other young people of being ambushed by security forces who appeared to be acting as vice police. According to several people targeted by the raids, most incidents ended with the police taking monetary bribes from the couples.

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