• KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 40

Large Bribes Being Extorted from Graduates of Foreign Universities in Turkmenistan

Turkmenistan citizens graduating from foreign universities, are currently required to undergo a complex process to have their  diplomas recognized in their home country. A source in the Main Department of Education of Lebap told Radio Azatlyk that Turkmenistan citizens graduating  from pedagogical universities in CIS countries are obliged to enrol in a month-long advanced training course at the Pedagogical Institute in Turkmenabad to nostrify (recognize university qualifications) their diplomas and moreover, provide 17 references. According to graduates, the process also involves the extortion of bribes. Hakberdi, a Russian language teacher from Turkmenabad who underwent the diploma recognition process about five years ago, explained that the size of the bribe depends on the influential status of whoever is engaged to help. "From 2018 to 2019, the bribe could reach 10-15 thousand dollars. If you have an acquaintance in the ministry, the bribe will be smaller, but can rise if intermediaries are involved." In addition, when attempting to get their diplomas recognized, graduates can fall prey to fraudsters who promising help, take their money and disappear. In parallel with the season of diploma nostrification, the process of submitting documents and sitting exams for admission to foreign universities continues. Exams are taken online and because of internet issues, this can create new problems. "Since the speed of the Wi-Fi signal at home is inadequate," reported a resident of Dianev, "applicants from across the districts gather at the Turkmentelecom internet cafe in Turkmenabad but there are not enough computers and often queues from 6 a.m."

Turkmen Sewing: From Ancient Traditions to Modern Art

Turkmen sewing is not just a craft but a real art; its roots go deep into the past, to the Paleolithic era. In the Paleolithic era, people used fur and animal skins for sewing, needles made of bone, and threads made of tendons. Over the centuries, Turkmen's sewing has preserved its uniqueness. It is closely connected with national clothing and is an integral part of the people's cultural heritage. The national costume of Turkmenistan, especially women's, has always been and remains an integral part of everyday clothes for girls and women of all ages. The tradition has always been uninterrupted, and today, Turkmen women continue to wear outfits and jewelry similar to those worn by their ancestors in the 18th and 19th centuries. Women's everyday clothes consisted of dresses, robes, and scarves made of plain cotton fabrics. Festive outfits were made of bright silk fabrics with rich embroidery, and wedding dresses and robes combined exquisite embroidery with silver jewelry. The traditional costume of a Turkmen woman was a bright ensemble: a high headdress draped with silk or woolen shawl, a long red dress with a robe over it, shoes on the feet, a narrow strip of embroidered pants, and a lot of silver jewelry. [caption id="attachment_20018" align="alignnone" width="300"] @advantour.comTurkmen women in traditional clothes with a national carpet[/caption] The modern style of Turkmen clothing preserves the best national features, offering many variants of sleeve shapes and decorative trimming. Each dress is necessarily decorated with ornamental hand embroidery or artistic machine stitching. Even today, Turkmen women prefer traditional outfits, such as a long velvet dress decorated with modern embroidery and jewelry. Even the wealthiest European-style costume cannot compete with the beauty and traditionality of the Turkmen national dress. [caption id="attachment_20023" align="alignnone" width="300"] @iStockA group of dancers before the performance at the Kurban-Bairam Festival.[/caption] In addition, the ornaments used in Turkmen embroidery have a deep symbolic meaning, tying together passed-down knowledge and traditions. Each pattern's history is connected with nature, the cosmos, and mythology. Turkmen embroidery is famous for its skill and precision. It is done by hand, using thin needles and silk or cotton threads. Traditionally, Turkmen women begin sewing in childhood, mastering the embroidery technique from their mothers and grandmothers. Modern Turkmen sewing is actively developing, combining traditional techniques with contemporary trends. Masters use new materials and experiment with colors and ornaments, creating unique works and patterns. [caption id="attachment_20025" align="alignnone" width="200"] @tourstoturkmenistan.comTurkmen national carpets[/caption] Despite the development of technologies, Turkmen sewing remains a valuable type of hand labor passed from generation to generation. It is a bright symbol of Turkmenistan's national wealth and cultural heritage. In 2022, Turkmen embroidery was included in the Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

UNDP Launches Course on Gender Issues in Turkmenistan

Turkmenportal has reported that the United Nations Development Programme is launching a specialized online course on gender issues for Turkmenistan's civil servants. The course will cover topics such as basic gender definitions, international standards, gender in public policy, gender analysis tools, local gender stereotypes, strategies for achieving gender equality, national frameworks, the prevention of gender-based violence, and engaging men in efforts to promote gender equality. Training will be offered in English, Russian, and Turkmen, and will include texts, quizzes, presentations, and other content to aimed at providing the necessary knowledge and skills to promote gender equality in the workplace. The course is expected to provide civil servants with a comprehensive understanding of gender equality concepts and international standards, enhance their ability to integrate gender aspects into public policy, and enable them to actively promote gender-responsible governance. As Tomica Paovic, the UNDP Resident Representative in Turkmenistan, noted, mainstreaming gender issues and awareness into civil servants' work is crucial to promoting equality, enhancing policy effectiveness, and ensuring sustainable development. "We are confident that this important initiative, supported by the UNDP's partner, the Government of Canada, will strengthen the country's capacity for gender equality and women's empowerment, in line with the National Action Plans on Human Rights and Gender Equality in Turkmenistan," Paovic stated.

Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan Nominate Traditional Craft of ‘Guram’ for UNESCO Cultural Heritage List

Turkmenistan's National Commission to UNESCO is actively working towards the international promotion of the country's cultural heritage and in collaboration with Azerbaijan, has nominated the patchwork art of 'guram' for inclusion in the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Regarding the move, Chinar Rustemova, Executive Secretary of the National Commission of Turkmenistan for UNESCO, stated, "We have also started talks with the Turkic History and Culture Foundation of the Republic of Turkey (TURKTAV) on cooperation in popularizing the cultural heritage of the Turkmen people in the Turkic world. The plans include expanding exhibition and library activities and organizing specific events within the framework of the regional project 'Our Heritage' proposed by the Turkmen side." It should be noted that this year, on the initiative of Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Iran, preparations are underway to nominate "Traditions of making cradles and singing cradle songs" for inclusion in the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

U.S. Program Promotes Women Entrepreneurship in Turkmenistan

On June 8, participants in the first Academy for Women Entrepreneurs (AWE) program in Turkmenistan submitted their business proposals to a panel of experts in Ashgabat. The event marked the conclusion of the AWE program launched by the U.S. Embassy in Turkmenistan in partnership with the Union of Economists of Turkmenistan in March this year. As reported by the U.S. Embassy, the ‘graduation’ ceremony was the culmination of three months’ work, consisting of an online business course developed by Arizona State University’s Thunderbird School of Global Management, weekly face-to-face sessions, and the development of a business plan. AWE is a U.S. State Department program that provides women entrepreneurs with the knowledge, networks and access required to start and grow successful businesses. The first 50 Turkmen graduates of the program now join a global community of over 25,000 AWE alumnae. Opening the event, U.S. Chargé d’Affaires Vaida Vidugiris said: “We are so pleased that this year, Turkmenistan joined more than 100 participating countries of AWE. I am especially proud that this program took place not only in Ashgabat, but also in Dashoguz, Mary, and Turkmenabat where we have our American Corners. It underscores our belief in the untapped potential of women entrepreneurs who, with the right support and resources, can transform economies, uplift communities, and inspire future generations.”    

Story of a Statue: Turkmenistan Shapes National Identity

The giant bronze statue of a robed man holding a book stands on the southern outskirts of Turkmenistan’s capital, Ashgabat, and is visible from many parts of the city. Including the granite base, it is more than 80 meters high. The sculptor says the rising sun illuminates the structure at dawn, giving it a hallowed aura. Diplomats and other dignitaries recently assembled for the inauguration of the statue of Magtymguly Pyragy, a revered poet and philosopher who serves today as a state-sponsored symbol of national and cultural identity. Some carried bouquets of flowers as they walked up the steps toward the looming monolith. Later, there were fireworks, a multi-colored light show and a drone display in the sky that formed the image of a quill pen. Led by President Serdar Berdimuhamedov, the ceremony on May 17 marked the 300th anniversary of the official birthday of Pyragy, who is little known outside Central Asia but is vital to a campaign of national cohesion in a country whose brand of personalized state control often seems opaque and eccentric to observers. Pyragy was born in the 18th century in what is today Iran, and is associated with Sufi spiritualism. He wrote about love, family and morality, and also laced his poetry with yearning for Turkmen solidarity at a time of conflict and fragmentation. Today, his image adorns postage stamps and banknotes in Turkmenistan. A theater carries his name. A symphony. A street. A university. People put his verse to songs at festivals. His lines form aphorisms in Turkmen, a Turkic language spoken in parts of Central Asia. Turkmenistan is of interest to foreign powers for its deep energy reserves, but this year its diplomats made an intense push in world capitals to get people interested in something else about the country: Magtymguly Pyragy. They promoted events about the poet in cities including Washington, Paris, Beijing and Seoul. The message was, as the state news agency put it, that Pyragy´s work is “an invaluable asset of all mankind.” Indeed, the park where the giant Pyragy statue stands in Ashgabat also contains much, much smaller statues of writers from other parts of the world, including William Shakespeare, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Rabindranath Tagore. One commentator has even compared Pyragy to German philosopher Immanuel Kant, saying they were born around the same time and had similar ideas. Russian granite was transported in nearly 100 railway cars to Ashgabat for construction of the new Pyragy statue, according to contractor Alexander Petrov. The statue is among the more grandiose monuments in a capital studded with them. Sculptor Saragt Babayev noted that the statue shows Pyragy in a turban, in contrast to an older image of the poet that shows him wearing a peaked Astrakhan hat, which was made of sheep fur and had no religious significance. That image dates to the time when Turkmenistan was part of the Soviet Union and Moscow was cracking down on expressions of Islamic piety. “During the time when the...