• KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01142 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09344 0.86%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 161

Afghan and Emirati Companies Making Use of Turkmenistan Stock Exchange

Last week 38 deals were registered at Turkmenistan's State Commodity Exchange. Their combined value amounted to over $7 million, the Turkmen government is reporting. It is reported that businesses from the United Arab Emirates, Afghanistan, and Uzbekistan used foreign currency to purchase aviation kerosene and polypropylene produced by the national oil company Türkmennebit. In addition, bed linens, denim and cotton fabric products, cotton yarn, and Portland cement were sold for foreign currency to the UAE, Afghanistan, and Kyrgyzstan. For the domestic market, Turkmen businesses purchased polypropylene, blended paraffin, base oil, carbon black and iodine, bischofite, sodium sulfate, float sheet glass, and handmade carpets. The total value of the transactions amounted to over $150,000.

Dreaming of Paris, Fighting for Power: Electricity in Central Asia

The COP28 UN Climate Change Conference in December 2023 highlighted the important role of developing countries – which include the Central Asian republics – in reducing dependence on fossil fuels thanks to the use of cleaner, renewable energy sources. Indeed, Central Asia is believed to have something to offer the world in the fight against climate change, being home to numerous sources of clean energy, including solar, wind, and hydropower.   The "electricity ring" Last year, fossil fuels accounted for 95% of the total energy supply in the five Central Asian countries, according to the UN. To meet their commitments under the Paris Agreement and the transition to a low-carbon and sustainable energy system, the region will need to make a giant leap from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources. The main issue is that this transition must be made by different electrical grids across Central Asia, most of which are linked to the Central Asian Power System (CAPS). CAPS, also known as the "electricity ring," is a joint power transmission network connecting Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, and some southern parts of Kazakhstan. It was created in 1960, with the aim of ensuring the reliable transmission of electricity and steady cooperation between the republics. The energy systems of these regions are united into a single structure, which allows for parallel operation even when individual sections of the grid go down, meaning that if one part of the ring goes down, the other parts continue to function, improving reliability and efficiency. This system plays an important role in ensuring energy security and promoting cooperation and interaction. The creation and maintenance of any power system requires coordinated work by all participants. In the past, some countries temporarily withdrew from CAPS for various reasons, but in most cases, they sought to resume cooperation and their link to the “electricity ring.”   Blackout On January 25, 2022, consumers in the ring experienced a blackout. The lights went out almost instantly in the south of Kazakhstan (the city of Almaty, as well as Turkestan, Kyzylorda, Almaty and Zhambyl regions), in Kyrgyzstan (the cities of Bishkek and Osh and the Issyk-Kul region) and Uzbekistan (the city of Tashkent, the Fergana Valley and Syr Darya, Jizzakh, Samarkand, Navoi and Kashkadarya regions). The widespread power outage paralyzed transportation, shut down important social infrastructure, and spurred popular discontent in the three countries affected. The Kazakhstani pundit Petr Svoik, a former professional power engineer who ran a thermal power plant (TPP), described the blackout as an unprecedented event, noting, however, that the technology worked perfectly and that the sudden loss of 1,500 MW of electricity did not lead to any major consequences. The Kazakhstani energy system consists of two insufficiently connected parts – north and south. The north is actually a continuation of the Russian power system, part of the Russian “energy bridge” - though, of course, it also has importance for the whole of Kazakhstan - whilst the south is part of the Central Asian ring. Looking at the...

Indian Companies Interested in Turkmenistan’s Seaport

Issues concerning the establishment of cooperation in the field of maritime transportation, as well as the possibility of cargo transit through Turkmenbashi International Sea Port, were recently discussed by representatives of the Agency Turkmendenizdaryaollary with the Ambassador of the Republic of India in Turkmenistan, according the Agency's website reports During the meeting, the excellent potential for cargo transit offered by the Turkmenbashi port, which occupies a crucial location in the North-South transport corridor, was noted and encouraged a proposal by  representatives of “Turkmendenizdaryaollarya” to assist the Indian side in establishing an exchange of expertise in port management. In its summary of the meeting, the report stated,  "The Indian Ambassador said that more than 30 Indian companies are interested in visiting Turkmenistan and familiarizing themselves with the opportunities of Turkmenbashi port. Following the meeting, the parties agreed to make every effort to develop cooperation in maritime transportation.”

Women in Central Asia in Need of Protection from Violence

 Central Asian Countries are seeing a new wave of violence against women and girls, and the fight against their long-standing powerlessness is just beginning. In 2023, the Women, Peace and Security Index (WPS Index), published by the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security and the PRIO Centre on Gender, Peace and Security, found Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan the most dangerous countries in Central Asia for women. Things were deemed slightly better in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan. The challenges faced by women in the region result from a combination of factors: the low number of women in government and law enforcement, women’s lack of financial independence, especially in rural areas, a distorted understanding of traditions across populations, and a mentality in society that often denies or covers up flagrant cases of injustice.   The law is written in blood: the case of Kazakhstan According to WPS experts, Kazakhstan has progressed further than its neighbors toward equality. Still, according to Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Internal Affairs, 69 women and seven children died in 2023 in domestic conflicts alone. It is believed that, on average, at least 80 women die every year at the hands of those they live with; every day, the police receive hundreds of calls, while thousands of women need the help of specialized protection and support centers. According to the Prosecutor General, last year 150 women sustained severe injuries and 200 moderate injuries in marital conflicts, with another 4,000 suffering minor bruises. This year, however, marked a turning point for Kazakhstani society – more and more women are recording videos with marks from beatings, posting the videos on social media, and calling on the police to punish their abusers. Even high-profile domestic abusers can now be exposed. The trigger for these changes was the trial of former Nazarbayev-era Minister of the National Economy, Kuandyk Bishimbayev, who beat his wife, Saltanat Nukenova, to death last November. Following a live-streamed trial, this May, Bishimbayev was sentenced to 24 years in prison for her murder. Even during the Bishimbayev trial, Karina Mamash, the wife of a Kazakh diplomat in the UAE, went public with allegations about systematic abuse, calling on the state to help. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs urgently recalled her husband, Embassy Counselor Saken Mamash, who may be fired. Karina is now at home with her children while a criminal case has been opened against her husband. She has since reported threats from her husband's relatives. Also in May, Akmaral Umbetkalieva, a resident of Atyrau, alleged that her ex-husband, Rinat Ibragimov – the akim (mayor) of Makat District in Atyrau Region – had beaten her for eleven years and taken away their children. Ibragimov called the allegations slander. The month before, former Taldykorgan police chief, Marat Kushtybaev was sentenced to eleven years for raping a girl in his office in November 2023. Another headline from April was that a security guard at an Almaty bar who had been convicted of raping a girl at knifepoint would serve eight years in prison. The...

Turkmenistan and UAE Expand Cooperation in Oil and Gas

Turkmenportal reports that prospects for further cooperation in the fuel and energy sector were the focus of recent discussions between Chairman of the Khalk Maslakhaty of Turkmenistan, Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov, and the Executive Director of Dragon Oil Company, Ali Rashid Al-Jarwan. According to the publication, Turkmenistan and the UAE are among the richest countries in the world in terms of natural gas and oil reserves and both have extensive experience in developing the oil and gas industry. Dragon Oil has now been  operating in Turkmenistan for a number of years. Commenting on the UAE's positive relationship with the country Al-Jarwan  expressed gratitude for the opportunity to work in Turkmenistan. Berdimuhamedov in turn, emphasized that the  active bilateral interaction enjoyed by the parties was due to the joint efforts of the countries' leaders and expressed Uzbekistan's readiness to further expand productive cooperation with Dragon Oil . Both sides expressed confidence that their existing mutual interests would provide a strong basis for more fruitful cooperation in the oil and gas sector.

U.S. Program Promotes Women Entrepreneurship in Turkmenistan

On June 8, participants in the first Academy for Women Entrepreneurs (AWE) program in Turkmenistan submitted their business proposals to a panel of experts in Ashgabat. The event marked the conclusion of the AWE program launched by the U.S. Embassy in Turkmenistan in partnership with the Union of Economists of Turkmenistan in March this year. As reported by the U.S. Embassy, the ‘graduation’ ceremony was the culmination of three months’ work, consisting of an online business course developed by Arizona State University’s Thunderbird School of Global Management, weekly face-to-face sessions, and the development of a business plan. AWE is a U.S. State Department program that provides women entrepreneurs with the knowledge, networks and access required to start and grow successful businesses. The first 50 Turkmen graduates of the program now join a global community of over 25,000 AWE alumnae. Opening the event, U.S. Chargé d’Affaires Vaida Vidugiris said: “We are so pleased that this year, Turkmenistan joined more than 100 participating countries of AWE. I am especially proud that this program took place not only in Ashgabat, but also in Dashoguz, Mary, and Turkmenabat where we have our American Corners. It underscores our belief in the untapped potential of women entrepreneurs who, with the right support and resources, can transform economies, uplift communities, and inspire future generations.”    

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