• KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01179 0.85%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00209 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09364 -0.32%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 85

Uzbekistan Creates Law to Address Excessive Energy Consumption

The law “On saving energy, its rational use and increasing energy efficiency" was approved at the plenary session of the Senate of the Oliy Majlis held in Uzbekistan on July 10. The law defines the tasks and rules for ensuring energy security, saving energy, increasing efficiency, and promoting rational use of resources, such as electric and thermal energy, fuel, and non-traditional energy resources in economic and social sectors. The law also establishes the responsibility for excessive energy resource consumption in Uzbekistan. Energy-saving directions and improvements in energy efficiency apply to the fields of construction and transport, buildings and structures, heat supply and utility companies, agriculture, and water management. According to the senators, the adoption of this law will help further optimize the costs of energy resources and create a legal basis for systematic monitoring of energy consumption efficiency.

Uzbekistan: Bukhara Administration Denies Relocation of “Eternal Bukhara”

Previously, The Times of Central Asia reported in an article titled "Land Cleared for Tourism next to Old Bukhara; UNESCO Urges Pause" that the construction of "Eternal Bukhara," a tourist facility in the Bukhara region of Uzbekistan, had sparked protests from locals and UNESCO alike. Recently, rumors spread on social media claiming that the "Eternal Bukhara" project is proceeding on the city's outskirts despite public objections. However, the Bukhara city administration has now provided official information to clarify the situation. According to the regional administration, these reports are false. They assert that the construction of the cultural ethnographic park "Eternal Bukhara" is progressing systematically. Most of the old and dilapidated buildings in the area have been dismantled, and the construction site is now 90% ready. Additionally, the Bukhara regional administration have stated that previous dismantling work was completed without affecting the population or surrounding structures, whilst adhering to technical safety regulations. Nearly 70% of the work has reportedly already been completed. The administration also noted that the project documents for "Eternal Bukhara" are being finalized in collaboration with renowned historians, scientists, cultural heritage experts, and international project organizations.

Foreign Political Parties Banned in Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan has added to the law "On Political Parties," prohibiting the establishment and operation of foreign political parties and their subdivisions in Uzbekistan. The corresponding amendments were signed by President Shavkat Mirziyoyev, Kun.uz reports. Furthermore, the amendments broadened the conditions under which the powers of a deputy of the lower house and a senator could be terminated early. Elected representatives are prohibited from engaging in other paid activities (except for scientific, creative, and pedagogical work) and holding their positions if they have a permanent residence permit abroad. Additionally, parliamentarians will lose their mandate if they fail to participate for 30 days without a valid reason in the activities of their respective chamber, political party faction, committee, or commission. Similar measures are envisaged for deputies of regional, district, and city councils of people's deputies (local parliament). Five political parties are registered in Uzbekistan: the Liberal Democratic Party, the Milliy Tiklanish (National Revival) Democratic Party, the Adolat (Justice) Social Democratic Party, the People's Democratic Party, and the Ecological Party.

Nuclear Race: Will Central Asia Build a Nuclear Power Plant?

The answer to the question posed in the title remains uncertain. While Uzbekistan has plans to construct a nuclear power plant and Kazakhstan is set to hold a referendum this fall to gauge public opinion on building one, progress is sluggish. Tashkent has postponed the start of construction, and the issue sparks heated debate in Kazakhstan. The First Nuclear Power Plant in Central Asia Historically, Central Asia did host a nuclear facility. Located on the shore of the Caspian Sea in Kazakhstan, this was not a conventional nuclear power plant but a fast neutron reactor known as BN-350. The reactor was the core of the Mangistau Nuclear Power Plant, designed to transform the Mangyshlak Peninsula by providing energy to the city of Aktau (formerly Shevchenko) and powering large-scale desalination plants that supplied drinking water to the arid region. [caption id="attachment_20031" align="aligncenter" width="366"] BN-350[/caption] Operational from 1973 until its shutdown in 1999, the BN-350 reactor was decommissioned due to the allocation of U.S. funds for new desalination and heating equipment and the disposal of its remaining fuel. The extensive maintenance and decommissioning work on the BN-350 have given Kazakhstani nuclear physicists significant experience with such complex and hazardous technology. However, younger generations in Kazakhstan are largely unaware of the BN-350 reactor’s existence. Their knowledge of nuclear physics is often limited to the harrowing stories passed down about nuclear warhead tests at the Semipalatinsk test site and their devastating effects. Fear and Nuclear Power: Kazakhstan's Dilemma The societal fear surrounding nuclear energy in Kazakhstan is deeply intertwined with political concerns. For a long time, the leadership in Kazakhstan has hesitated to move beyond merely discussing the need for a nuclear power plant (NPP) to actually initiating the project. President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev recently announced that a referendum would take place in the fall of 2024. However, Ministry of Energy's officials avoided mentioning the word "referendum" until the last moment, previously asserting it was unnecessary. Public hearings were held last year in the village of Ulken, Zhambyl district, Almaty region, a proposed site for the nuclear plant. The Ministry of Energy’s press release stated that the local populace supported developing nuclear power, highlighting its significance for regional socio-economic growth. However, media reports revealed that the hearings were contentious, with opposing viewpoints almost disrupting the speech of Nurlan Ertas, the head (akim) of the Zhambyl district. Activists even displayed banners and posters against the plant's construction. Certain groups have exploited the population's fear of another disaster like Chernobyl. Additionally, the government has struggled to convince the public that nuclear technologies are becoming safer. In contrast, Europe now includes nuclear power plants in its list of green energy sources, similar to other renewable energy sources (RES). In Kazakhstan, renewable energy accounts for only 5% of the total energy produced. The introduction of NPPs could significantly enhance the country’s position in reducing carbon emissions. The government faces a growing electricity shortage that can be addressed either harmfully or fearfully. The harmful options are coal-fired thermal power plants...

Illegal Underground Tunnel Unearthed on Uzbekistan-Kazakhstan Border

An illegal underground tunnel has been discovered in the border area of  Tashkent and Kazakhstan, according to the State Security Service of Uzbekistan (SSS). It is noted that SSS employees were quick to call a meeting to cooperate with the “Tashkent-Aero” specialized customs complex's  border troops and military personnel. The gathering exposed a cross-border criminal group's illegal importation of large quantities of substandard drugs from India through Kazakhstan to Uzbekistan. The drugs were brought into Almaty's international airport via the Delhi-Tashkent-Almaty air route. The stash was then delivered to the Dostlik settlement in the  Saryogoch district of the  Turkestan region, Kazakhstan, and transferred onwards to Tashkent's  Orikzor neighbourhood, through a secret underground route. The horde comprised 17,048 drugs, produced in India under 107 brands including Albumin, Remdesivir, and Meropenem. Valued at 1 billion 94 million UZS (approximately $87,096.82), the drugs were retained as evidence against the smugglers who are currently being held in detention. Running a distance of 310 meters, the underground tunnel is a sophisticated construction furnished with  air ventilation,  lighting , carts, and ropes for cargo transportation. In a previous post, The Times of Central Asia reported on the discovery of another secret tunnel connecting Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.

Push to Increase Youth Employment in Uzbekistan.

At the meeting on June 28, Uzbekistan president Shavkat Mirziyoyev forwarded a proposal for boosting employment amongst the country's youth. According to a report by press secretary Sherzod Asadov,  announced on Telegram, regional and district governors have been instructed to hold job fairs in schools, technical institutes, universities, and recreation parks over the summer, with the aim of placing some 150,000 young people in vacant positions. The president stressed the importance of organizing construction squads in the summer months and recruiting 100,000 young people for monthly jobs. He also noted that initiatives offered by businesses for vocational training and employment of young people continue to be supported. From the 2024/2025 academic year, expenses incurred by entrepreneurs in training and employing students from schools, colleges, and technical institutes are to deducted from the tax base. Student income tax and social tax are set at 1%.