• KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 7 - 12 of 106

Healing Properties of Uzbekistan’s Chashma Spring Draw Curious Tourists

It’s Sunday morning, and a nice breeze is blowing. Due to favorable weather, many people are paying a visit to the Chashma complex in Nurota, in the Navoi region of Uzbekistan. The complex is one of the most visited holy places by Central Asian Muslims, and thousands of tourists from all over the world flock here every year. The Times of Central Asia decided to see how popular the tourist spot is. This historical complex includes the Chilustun Mosque, the Chashma Spring, the Panjab (Beshpanja) Well, the Panjvaqta Mosque, and Sheikh Abul Husan Nuri Mausoleum. The people of Nurota district mainly speak Tajik, in which the word Chashma means "holy spring."   In the 9th century, the Chilustun Mosque was built at Chashma; it was rebuilt in the 16th century during the rule of Amir Timur. The mosque, erected near the holy spring, has a dome-shaped sundial with cylindrical windows, which sits in the heart of the mosque. In addition, the art of wood carving and other examples of Central Asian national decoration were skillfully used in the construction of the mosque. Panjvaqta Mosque is located next to Chilustun. This mosque was built between 1570 and 1582 upon orders from Abdullah Khan II, the Emir of Bukhara. Today, the building consists of a large dome with two-sided porticos. All of its columns are made of mulberry and elm wood, and the base is made of marble. The main focus of visitors is the Chashma Spring. Local resident, Zilola Safarova has said that 40,000 years ago, a meteorite fell from the sky in this place and radiated light for a hundred days. As a result of the meteorite, a crater was formed and a holy spring with healing properties appeared. The people of Nurota believe this legend, and many are of the opinion that the name Nurota is related to this event. Chashma's water flows through thousands of kilometers of underground passages at a rate of 290 liters per second, and the temperature of its water remains constant in all seasons of the year at 19.5° Celsius. The spring's highest recorded flow rate was 400 liters per second. Furthermore, Chashma's water is said to have healing properties. It was found that it contains trace amounts of gold, which is said to be a cure for gastrointestinal diseases. It has long been known that iodine in water is a cure for goiters, and rare bromine is known as a cure for nervous disorders. Meanwhile, silver contained in the water ensures that its mineral composition is well preserved. Microbiologists say that this holy water contains 15 useful trace elements which have the ability to calm a person and may have a positive effect on the body. If one pays attention to the entire picture here, there are fish in the Chashma, which are called river marinka. These fish have an average lifespan of 17 years, and clean the streams from which spring water emerges out of sand. That sand ensures a moderate flow...

Case Documents for 11 Temirov Live Journalists Submitted to Court in Kyrgyzstan

Legal documents regarding the cases of eleven current and former journalists of the Temirov Live project, who are accused of calling for mass riots, have been handed over to the court. According to the Pervomaisky District Court of Bishkek, the criminal case was received by the court office and will be handed over to the judge through the automatic distribution of cases of the AIS system, 24.kg news agency has stated. As previously reported by the Times of Central Asia, on January 16, Interior Ministry officers searched the office of Temirov Live and confiscated its editorial equipment. The police also searched the journalists' homes and detained eleven current and former employees of the publication. The motivation behind the case was one of Temirov's projects called "Ait, Ait Dese," which was published on YouTube in the fall of 2023, which the authorities claim called for mass disorder. At the time, Kyrgyz Interior Minister Ulanbek Niyazbekov said the detainees weren't journalists. "We cannot [help] but respond when they disseminate inaccurate information and engage in vilification. There are those who do not know the laws of journalism and do not have the relevant knowledge. They do not know and spread misleading information, sowing confusion among the people. I believe that we should not consider them as journalists," news agencies quoted the Interior Minister as saying. The detainees were Makhabat Tazhibek kyzy, Sapar Akunbekov, Azamat Ishenbekov, Saipidin Sultanaliyev, Aktilek Kaparov, Tynystan Asypbekov, Maksat Tazhibek uulu, Joodar Buzumov, Zhumabek Turdaliyev, Aike Beishekeeva and Akyl Orozbekov. They were all taken into custody in January for two months, until March 13. Later, the court released some of the detained journalists under house arrest and on their own recognizance. Already facing a backlash over its so-called "foreign agents law," Bishkek has pushed back against international criticism of the high-profile prosecution, saying the case is not politically motivated and that those facing charges are poorly educated people masquerading as journalists. In late 2022, Kyrgyzstan deported Bolot Temirov, an investigative reporter with dual Kyrgyz and Russian nationality. "Temirov was sent to Russia by force with no belongings, no phone, no money or international passport, and in violation of deportation procedures,” the head of Reporters Without Bordfers Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk, Jeanne Cavelier stated at the time.

Kazakh Pensioner Takes A Trip To Paris — On His Bicycle

Sixty-four year-old Rabbim Borashev, from the town of Beineu in western Kazakhstan's Mangystau region, has set out to cycle to the Olympic Games in Paris, which begin at the end of July. He plans to cover 5,000 kilometers on his bike, reports Lada.kz. "You could say that traveling to the Olympics is my dream. When I was young there was no chance, but now the time has come. First I will go from Aktau to Baku. Representatives of [Kazakhstan's] Consulate General will be waiting there, and will escort me to the border with Georgia. This is great support for me. Then I will go to Batumi and participate in the Great Steppe Hike project. In June, I will leave for Turkey. I have plans to pass through Hungary, Austria, Germany and reach France," said Borashev. Before retiring, Borashev worked in the construction industry. In recent years he has become interested in cycling, and has taken part in several races.

“This Disaster Has Shown We Are All United”: An Interview with Zakirzhan Kharisovich, Deputy of Petropavlovsk, about the Kazakh Floods

This spring Kazakhstan struggled to contain flooding that displaced upwards of 120,000 people -- described by president Kasym-Jomart Tokayev as the country’s ‘worst natural disaster in 80 years’. With the flooding now contained, and excess water being repurposed, The Times of Central Asia spoke to Zakirzhan Kharisovich, a deputy of the maslikhat (local representative body) of the city of Petropavlovsk, about his experience of the natural disaster. TCA: What were the main challenges you faced during the first months of the floods? ZK: The last time we experienced floods was back in 2017, when my yard was filled with 30-40 centimetres of water. We knew then that if rainfall exceeded the norm, the subsequent rise in the water level in the Sergeevskoye Reservoir, 170 kilometers away, would again pose a threat. This year, alerted by weather forecasts, to combat the problem I joined residents in building embankments and dams. We were assisted by soldiers from Astana, whom we called the "300 Spartans", as well as staff from the Emergency Situations Department in Karaganda. Despite precautionary measures, this time my yard was flooded with three meters of water. I couldn’t access my home for over three weeks, and during that time everything inside -- furniture, household appliances, etc. -- was submerged. TCA: How was aid organized in the first days after the floods? ZK: Due to the collapse of the city’s water tower, we had no access to drinking water for almost a month. In addition to providing the aforementioned help, Kazakhstan’s volunteer movement worked full-pelt in shipping in truckloads of humanitarian aid, including household products, mattresses, clothes, food, cereal, rice and flour, as well as pumps and water-pumping generators. The range of their assistance was enormous. Our compatriots in nearby cities, such as Kurgan and Tyumen, were worried about us and were quick to assist. We also received support from other places, including Dagestan, Tajikistan, Ingushetia, and from Russia and further afield. TCA: How did the akimat, public services and local communities work together, and what support was provided by the central government in addressing issues? ZK: Under the supervision of the deputy akim, the akimat staff were actively involved in building the dam, as well as coordinating and organizing activities in response to the floods. I packed bags with water-absorbent materials. Regarding the actions of the central government, Roman Sklyar, the first deputy prime minister, immediately arrived on site to speak to residents and help supervise measures to both clear the damage and resolve other issues caused by the floods. Following his visit, prime minister Olzhas Bektenov proposed to allocate funds to replace essentials such as furniture, cooking utensils, refrigerators etc. So, in principle, if four million tenge ($9,100) worth of furniture and appliances has been lost, it will be covered by the government. This does however raise many questions. Whilst we have full confidence in the pledge made by the president to restore our property, doubts surround the lower officials’ full understanding of his intentions. TCA: What was...

Victory Day Comes in Central Asian Countries Without Much Pomp, but Plenty of Feeling

This year, as in previous years, the attitude toward Victory Day celebrations in Central Asian countries serves as an important political marker. The leaders of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan are scheduled to attend the Victory Day parade in Moscow on May 9. The leaders of Belarus, Cuba, Laos and Guinea-Bissau will also take part in the celebrations. The absences of the presidents of Uzbekistan, Armenia and Azerbaijan are particularly noticeable in that list. It's noteworthy that the Russian press is commenting on the different stances taken by the Central Asian countries in an extremely negative way -- deliberately agitating discord between Russia and the region. It's even been stated that Victory Day has been "canceled" in the region. Such are the broadcasts taking place against a backdrop of analysts' opinions: that in the coming decades, Central Asian countries won't be able to break the ties that bind them to their former Soviet master, as the economic dependence on Russia is only growing. This is especially true for Kazakhstan, as the lion's share of Kazakhstan's oil goes through Russian pipelines to Europe. In addition, a project increasing the transshipment of Russian hydrocarbons to China through Kazakhstan is in the works. However, contrary to the opinion of Russian tabloids, the Central Asian countries remain reverent and respectful of the cultural institution that is Victory Day. Most residents of the republics are proud of their fathers and grandfathers who fought on the fronts of World War II. In particular, for several years in a row, Kazakhstan has maintained a leading role in terms of doling out state budget payments to veterans of World War II. According to statistics, the size of a lump-sum social payment commemorating Victory Day in Kazakhstan, where 148 veterans live, averages $3,800. In Tajikistan there are 24 surviving veterans of World War II, and their payments amounted to $2,200-$2,300. Veterans in Uzbekistan received about $1,500, and in Belarus, Azerbaijan and Kyrgyzstan, about $1,100 apiece. Russia's 12,500 surviving veterans in Russia will receive the least -- the equivalent of only $107. To be sure, Kazakhstan has not held military parades in honor of the holiday for a year. That move is explained by the need to save money. This spring, unprecedented floods -- which affected almost half of the country -- have pushed President Kasym-Jomart Tokayev's administration to tend towards being thrifty and instead fund humanitarian aid and reconstruction. According to the Ministry of Defense of Kazakhstan, the parade requires spending about 4 billion tenge ($9 million) -- such a huge sum of money can be spent more impactfully on providing housing for the victims. Along with large-scale, WWII-related festive events in Kazakhstan, other important projects, such as international forums, have been canceled. Nevertheless, in his speech, President Tokayev not only congratulated veterans, but also emphasized the need to prepare for the 80th anniversary of the May 1945 victory, which is scheduled to be widely celebrated next year. In Uzbekistan, May 9 is considered a Day of Remembrance, but...

Uzbek Businesswoman Diora Usmanova Recounts Own History of Marital Violence

Diora Usmanova, the owner of two restaurants and some clothing brands in Uzbekistan, has spoken on her Instagram page about the beatings she suffered from her first husband, Babur Usmanov, who was the nephew of the billionaire Alisher Usmanov. Usmanova herself is related to Ziroatkhon Mirziyoyeva, the wife of Uzbek president Shavkat Mirziyoyev. Usmanova wrote that the story could cause her harm, but that she believes the benefits will "outweigh the risks a hundredfold" and will "change perceptions or somehow affect women who endure domestic violence and abuse," Gazeta.uz reported. "We loved each other and fought very hard for our marriage. Subsequently, when he started to raise his hand against me and when these beatings went on, and the beatings continued for four years, there were concussions, and a lot of blood, and bruises, and [my] whole body in bruises, and a lot of broken furniture, doors, everything," she said. Domestic violence is not only the man's fault, but also the woman's, Usmanova said. "We don't value ourselves enough, we're not brave enough, we're not strong enough, we're afraid to give a backhand, we're afraid to tell our parents, we're afraid to go back to our parents, we're afraid to start everything again. For the fact that we hope that it will change, that it will [bear] some good fruits in the future, that it will survive -- this is all our problem," Usmanova said. In her opinion, women should terminate harmful relationships and find the strength to leave -- and most importantly, learn to respect themselves. "You have to leave such relationships. [That's] because of the fact that you forgive once, forgive the second time, and then it becomes a habit, a person realizes that it is forgiven, it can end very badly, [a] whole life just poisoned. I did not find the strength then, and now after 10 years, I look back and realize how many mistakes were made on my part and how much is my fault. Just like [it was] his," she stated. On May 8, 2013, Babur Usmanov was involved in a fatal car accident in Tashkent. In 2016, Usmanova married businessman Batyr Rakhimov.

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