• KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01138 -0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00221 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09353 0.97%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 138

PepsiCo to Build Snack Production Plant in Kazakhstan

PepsiCo has announced plans to build a full-scale new plant to produce salty snacks, including Lays crisps, in Kazakhstan’s Almaty region. Implementation of the project was discussed at a meeting between Kazakhstan Prime Minister Olzhas Bektenov and David Manzini, President of PepsiCo in Central Asia, Russia, Belarus, and Caucasus. According to the Kazakh prime minister’s press service, the project has already received $160 million in foreign investment. The plant, anticipated as the largest of its kind in Central Asia, is scheduled to open in 2026. Its original capacity of up to 16,000 tons of finished products per year, will increase to 21,000 tons from 2027, for distribution to both the Central Asian market and abroad. Up to a thousand people will be employed during the plant’s construction, with 350 skilled jobs created when it opens. David Manzini stated PepsiCo’s intention to use locally sourced raw materials. The conclusion of contracts with Kazakh farmers on the delivery of test batches of potatoes is ongoing but all going to plan, the company will purchase up to 50-66 thousand tons of potatoes in 2026-2030, and increase the volume in later years. Prime Minister Bektenov emphasized the importance of the project for the development of agriculture, increasing Kazakh farmers’ income and strengthening the economy. He mentioned that besides its positive impact the food industry and agribusiness, the plant will have a multiplier effect on related industries including transport, logistics, packaging, and processing of agricultural products.  

Kazakhstan President Pinpoints Flaws in Tourism Development

On June 13, Kazakhstan President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev chaired a government meeting on the development of the country’s tourism industry. He opened by noting that despite its favorable geographical location, the diversity of its nature, and its rich historical and cultural heritage, Kazakhstan’s wide-spanning tourism potential remains largely unexploited. “Tourism as an important sector of the economy is not yet effective, which is a big omission of the government. Over the past four years, the share of tourism in the economic structure has decreased from 3.7% to 3.2%, almost threefold lower than the world average. According to this indicator, Kazakhstan falls below neighboring countries with similar climates and culture. It is obvious that a qualitative breakthrough in the development of the tourism industry requires urgent systemic measures,” said the president. Tokayev then outlined areas in need of urgent improvement, beginning with problems posed by the country’s weak transport infrastructure for domestic tourism: “The quality of railway transportation in the country is beyond criticism. Most of the rail carriages are worn out, and some do not even have air conditioning. The government needs to renew the fleet of rail carriages in the next five years. In addition, it is important to improve railway stations. Their appearance and infrastructure must meet international standards. In summer, the flow of railway passengers increases sharply. It is therefore necessary to increase the number of trains with comfortable carriages to the most popular destinations. The quality of our roads also leaves much to be desired, making it very difficult to reach remote recreation areas by car. There are practically no fully serviceable highways. The reconstruction of the Astana-Almaty highway, connecting the south and center of Kazakhstan, has been ongoing since 2021. There are many similar unfinished roads across the country and it is imperative that the government completes these road projects this year.” The President emphasized that the poor logistics connectivity of holiday destinations affects not only domestic tourism, but also the influx of guests from abroad. “Almost 90% of foreign tourists come to Kazakhstan from neighboring CIS [former Soviet] countries. There are still few tourists from non-CIS countries. International studies show that over 70% of travelers prefer to visit vacation destinations within a 4-hour flight, making Kazakhstan  very attractive to tourists from China, India, East Asia, and the Middle East. It is also necessary to consider, specific issues related to the national mentality of foreign tourists, their interests, and requests. Within 5 years we can double and even triple the number of foreign tourists but to do so, we need to develop air transport, firstly by expanding the presence of low-cost airlines on popular air routes. Their current share in passenger air transportation in Kazakhstan is only 21%.” The head of state criticized the Government's plans to simultaneously develop 20 tourist zones across the country, claiming the approach ineffective regarding the dispersion of the state's limited resources. Instead, he recommended that efforts focused on the development of the most promising locations, in the shortest possible time,...

Kazakh Chess Player Wins World Junior Title in India

Kazybek Nogerbek of Kazakhstan has become the FIDE world junior chess champion, winning the title in Gandhinagar, India even though he was only the ninth seed. An emotional Nogerbek, 20, briefly rested his head on his forearm on the table on Thursday after the tournament victory. “It feels very good,” said Nogerbek, who won the rapid and blitz titles in the World Youth U18 Championship. The Kazakh player is an international master (IM), which is the second most difficult title to secure after grandmaster (GM). A number of grandmasters were among those participating in the U20 World Junior Chess Championship, which started at the beginning of June. Divya Deshmukh, the 18-year-old top seed from India, won the girls’ section. Nogerbek’s victory was tight. He scored 8.5/11 points, as did grandmaster Emin Ohanyan of Armenia. But Nogerbek did better under a tiebreak system designed to determine a winner in such a scenario. Grandmaster Kuja Budisavljevic of Serbia won bronze with eight points. “Going into the final round, GM Mamikon Gharibyan from Armenia was in sole lead with eight points, half a point ahead of four players, including Nogerbek,” chess.com reported. “The two faced in the final round, with the Armenian making a crucial mistake in time trouble, while trying to defend a difficult ending.” Chess.com said the world junior championship has a prestigious history but fewer top players are participating because “more attractive tournaments” are available. FIDE is the International Chess Federation, which is the translated name of Federation International des Echecs, founded in Paris in 1924.

Decolonial Futurism: A Focus on Kazakhstan’s Pavilion at the 60th Venice Biennale

Kazakh artists have traditionally been marginalized in the global art scene due to political intricacies and a complex cultural identity. With historical influences and colonization by both Russia and China, Kazakh artists are now carving out a unique artistic identity and sharing it with international audiences. The Kazakh pavilion "Jerūiyq: Journey Beyond the Horizon" at the 60th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, from April 20 to November 24, represents a major milestone in changing perceptions of Kazakh art. Staged in the Naval Historical Museum, the exhibition reinterprets the ancient legend of Jerūiyq, drawing inspiration from Kazakh myths and the visionary journey of the 15th-century philosopher Asan Kaigy. The word "kaigy" means "pain" in Kazakh, symbolizing the nation's traumatic encounters with modernity's darker aspects: the devastating famine of the 1930s, the craters left by nuclear tests in Semey, the shrinking of the Aral Sea, and the wounds inflicted on the Kazakh landscape. The exhibition traces the evolution of Kazakh utopian imagination from the 1970s to today through artists’ visions of ideal worlds, where their utopian imagination merges with the artistic movement of "decolonial futurism." On behalf of TCA, Naima Morelli interviewed curator Anvar Musrepov on the concept and significance of Kazakhstan's participation in the Venice Biennale. TCA: How did the idea for the Kazak pavilion “Jerūiyq: Journey Beyond the Horizon” evolve? A.M: In our curatorial research, we found that the theme of utopia and futuristic imagination has concerned several generations of Kazakhstan's artists since the 1970s. Using this as a starting point, we decided to establish, in chronological order, a collection of works by multiple generations of artists. Divided by decades, the collection manifested a wave of Kazakh futurism, including themes of spirituality, cosmism, nomadism, and utopian ideas. This in turn, will help formulate a term to comprehensively describe and unite all these intuitions that have concerned Kazakh artists in different historical periods. [caption id="attachment_18933" align="aligncenter" width="522"] Sergey Maslov, "Baikonur" at the Venice Biennale [/caption]   TCA: The exhibition’s title alludes to the ancient legend of Jerūiyq. What is it about and  how have you interpreted it? A.M: Jeruiq is an ancient legend about a utopian land that according to many myths, was sought by Asan Kaigy, advisor to the first Kazakh khans Zhanibek and Kerey. Legend describes it as a land that has fermented, a place where time has stopped, a land full of vividness, devoid of disease or longing. We found in this ancient Kazakh legend, an ideal metaphor to unite all the intuitions presented in the exhibition and manifest the chronology of post-nomadic futuristic imagination. If established, the definition of this unique phenomenon, could become a movement in Kazakh art. TCA: What can you tell us about the philosopher Asan Kaigy? A.M: Asan Kaigy is a quasi-historical character who features in Kazakhstan’s rich oral tradition where history and memory are passed down from mouth to mouth. Every region of Kazakhstan has local legends about miracles performed by Asan Kaigy. One such legend says that he found...

Price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas to Rise Again in Kazakhstan

The Ministry of Energy of Kazakhstan has published for public discussion, a draft by the Minister of Energy to increase the price of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from July 1. The maximum wholesale price of one ton of LPG will be increased from the current 40,320 tenge to 45,158 tenge, and the maximum retail price will increase slightly — by 5-8 tenge per liter, depending on the region. Cheaper than gasoline, LPG is the most popular fuel for vehicle owners in Kazakhstan. A sharp hike in the price of LPG was met with nationwide objection in January, triggering mass protests in Zhanaozen which spread nationwide and turned violent in Almaty and Astana. The ministry issued several reasons for what will be an unpopular move. First, the price of liquefied petroleum gas is much lower than the cost of its production. The production cost of LPG varies from 60 thousand to 70 thousand tenge per ton, whereas the current maximum wholesale price is 40,320 tenge per ton. Second, LPG consumption in Kazakhstan increases year on year. In 2023, it increased by 400 thousand tons, or 28%, compared to 2022. Last year, LPG consumption volumes amounted to 2.2 million tons compared to 1.8 million tons in 2022. Increasing consumption and the unprofitability of LPG production due to low prices have led to a decrease in the production of the fuel and its shortage in the regions. Today the deficit of LPG stands at 20-25%. Third, due to unprofitability, manufacturers are increasingly losing interest in LPG production and switching instead, to more profitable products. For the same reason, investors are also reluctant to invest in its production. Fourth, the price of LPG in Kazakhstan, between 54-86 tenge per litre depending on the region, is the lowest among former Soviet states. For comparison, the price per litre in Russia is equivalent to 132 tenge; in Kyrgyzstan, 159 tenge; in Azerbaijan, 171 tenge; and in Tajikistan, 273 tenge. According to analysts, in 2024, LPG consumption in Kazakhstan will increase by another 200 thousand tons and reach 2.4 million tons, leading to a potential shortage of 30-40%

Kazakhstan’s Goodwill Ambassadors

A Goodwill Ambassadors of Kazakhstan project has been newly launched by Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Initiated by President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, the project aims to increase the country’s visibility and promote its achievements abroad. Under the scheme, Kazakhs excelling in art, sports, science, medicine, and other fields are enlisted to expand cultural and humanitarian communications by serving as conduits of peace, friendship, and international solidarity. Addressing the ‘ambassadors’ at the launch ceremony on June 6, Deputy Prime Minister–Minister of Foreign Affairs of Kazakhstan Murat Nurtleu announced: “In an unprecedented geopolitical environment, public and cultural-humanitarian diplomacy is becoming increasingly in demand. Thanks to your victories and outstanding performances on world stages, arenas, and conferences, our turquoise flag is raised across the globe, and our national anthem resounds with pride.” The profile of participants, publicly recognized for their contribution in shaping a positive image of the country internationally, is wide-ranging and to date, includes: Violin virtuoso, conductor, and director of the Alliance of Orchestras of the Asia-Pacific region Marat Bisengaliev; Olympic champion cyclist Alexander Vinokurov; artist and anti-nuclear activist Karikbek Kuyukov; pop singer Mirhidai Mirfarukh, known globally by his stage name Adam; Chairman of the Executive Board of the University Medical Center Corporate Fund and cardiac surgeon Yuri Pya; political scientist and historical map researcher Mukhit-Ardager Sydyknazarov; chief conductor of the State Academic Folklore and Ethnographic Orchestra named after Tlendiyev “Otyrar Sazy” Dinara Tlendiyeva; and powerlifting world record holder and Guinness Book record holder Sergey Tsyrulnikov.    

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