• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 1157

Kyrgyz Authorities Seeking Monopoly on Insurance, Industry Group Says

The Kyrgyz Association of Insurers is sounding the alarm that private insurance companies may soon be out of work due to government interference. According to a decree signed by Kyrgyz President Sadyr Zhaparov, all state bodies and local governments are now instructed to insure all their property with the State Insurance Organization (JSC SIO) in order to develop the national insurance market. "The Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic will define JSC SIO as the national operator for reinsurance, including export risks, within the framework of cooperation with the Eurasian Reinsurance Company," the document says. The Kyrgyz Association of Insurers appealed to human rights activists to assist in protecting their interests. Private insurers are sure that the new law violates their rights and doesn't comply with Kyrgyzstan's current legislation. "According to insurers, the principles of entrepreneurial activity established by the legislation of the country, such as non-interference of state bodies in the activities of business entities, are violated. In addition, the state guarantees for the protection of the rights of entrepreneurs equal rights and opportunities to access financial resources -- as well as the creation of conditions for the protection and development of competition -- are being violated," - said the International Business Council, which was engaged by Kyrgyz private insurance companies on the matter. The current law "On Organization of Insurance in the Kyrgyz Republic" prohibits interference in insurance activities. Private insurance brokers and business owners argue that the state is playing an unfair game at the legislative level, forcing state-owned companies to insure their property with the SIO. Besides, the financial means to underwrite risk and pay out possible insurance claims are miniscule to the capitalization of private insurers. Last year, the authorities increased the capitalization of the SSO to 1 billion som, and this year they will allocate another 300 million som by presidential decree. "In the prescribed manner by 2027 to find and gradually allocate funds in the amount of 5 billion som to JSC "SIO" to increase the authorized capital... By 2027, the annual profit in the amount of 100 percent, received from the activities of JSC "SIO," will be directed to increase the authorized capital at the expense of the distribution of budget revenues and expenditures," the law reads. Today, 15 insurance companies, including SSS -- as well as several Chinese and Kazakhstani insurers -- operate in the Kyrgyz market. People familiar with the situation who spoke to The Times of Central Asia say most of the major national companies are already insured with SIO, meaning that only civil insurance lines -- like health and life -- and auto insurance remain for private insurers.

The Taliban and its Neighbors: An Outsider’s Perspective

This is part two of a piece of which part one was published here. The topic of a regional approach to solving Afghanistan's problems is increasingly being discussed in various expert and diplomatic circles. The International Crisis Group (ICG), a reputable think tank whose opinion is extremely interesting as part of an "insider vs outsider" set of viewpoints, writes about this in particular. A report from ICG entitled "Taliban's Neighbors: Regional Diplomacy with Afghanistan" is one of the first works to summarize the role and place of the region as regards the situation around Afghanistan. In the voluminous work, the authors touch upon almost all aspects - issues of diplomatic recognition, security, terrorist activity, trade and economic relations within the region, water issues and others. In their conclusions, ICG analysts point out that many steps towards regional cooperation aren't related to Western donors, but European countries should nevertheless be interested. Europeans in particular would benefit from a stable, self-sufficient region that isn't a major source of illegal drugs, migrants or terrorism. But sanctions and other Western measures designed to show disapproval of the Taliban are obstacles to a more functional relationship between Kabul and the countries of the region. Significant progress depends on Western support - or at least tacit acquiescence. While such practical steps need not lead to  recognition of the Taliban regime, they will contribute to regional peace and security. However, experts are concerned that the emerging regional consensus is directly dependent on security and stability issues in Afghanistan - if regional neighbors feel that the government cannot restore order within Afghanistan's borders and contain transnational threats, the consensus may well collapse. If that happens, regional countries may be tempted to choose sides in another intra-Afghan civil conflict, repeating the destructive pattern of past decades. At the same time, experts believe that the first step toward improving regional security cooperation would be to cool down the rhetoric on all sides and get regional players to agree on security issues, even if they have different priorities. Security information sharing within the region also suffers because the Taliban have yet to build a trusted dialog. They lack credibility because of their complete denial of certain threats. Meanwhile, countries in the region and the world are guided by inflated estimates of militant numbers. The ICG's assessments of the security threats posed by Islamic State Khorasan Province (ISKP) are broadly in line with the consensus - in some ways, the growing concern about ISKP is paradoxical due to the fact that the overall level of violence associated with the group has declined over the past two years. The question of whether ISKP could become a more potent transnational threat in the future remains open. So far, its operations outside of its original territory near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border have been limited. On the other hand, ISKP continues to attract recruits from different parts of Central and South Asia and encourages attacks outside Afghanistan - arguably making it the most dangerous armed group in...

Chinese Investors Plan to Build Solar Power Plant in Tashkent Region

Chinese investors have agreed to implement more major projects in Uzbekistan, according to statements made following the visit of a trade delegation from China to Uzbekistan's Tashkent region. Chinese businesses intend to invest $2 billion in the construction of a solar power plant in Ahangaran, $25 million in providing food for employees of social facilities, and $20 million in the construction of a diagnostic center. Also, Chinese investors are ready to invest $90 million in projects focused on the production of pharmaceutical products, metal structures, artificial fiber and threads. Earlier, Uzbekhydroenergo and China Southern Power Grid International agreed on joint construction of a 600 MW pumped storage hydropower (PSH) called Verkhny Pskem. The cost of the project is estimated at $1 billion. The first solar power plant in Uzbekistan was established with the assistance of the World Bank Group, Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company (Masdar), the Asian Development Bank and the Government of Uzbekistan. The station, with a capacity of 100 megawatts, became the country's first large-scale renewable energy facility. According to Uzbekistan's Ministry of Energy, the country plans to build about 25 large-scale solar power plants in the next 10 years.

Poor-Quality Gasoline Refused by Taliban Doesn’t Belong to Uzbekistan

The Customs Committee of Uzbekistan denied that gasoline returned by the Taliban due to its poor quality in fact belongs to Uzbekistan, according to a post on the committee's Telegram channel. The Times of Central Asia has reported that the Taliban returned 120,000 liters of gasoline imported via the Hayraton border point to Uzbekistan due to its poor quality. It has been reported that the returned oil products didn't originate in Uzbekistan. On the contrary, 120 tons of gasoline loaded in two tanker trucks were sent to Afghanistan from Russia and moved through the territory of Uzbekistan only in transit mode. On February 7, these tankers left for Afghanistan through the Ayritom station in Surkhandarya, Uzbekistan. These oil products returned by Afghanistan entered Uzbekistan on April 6 through the Ayritom station. Also, the Customs Committee asked certain mass media operating in the country not to distribute unverified, one-sided, unconfirmed information. “At this point, we ask the mass media to study carefully before disseminating such information, taking into account the friendly relations between the two countries,” the Customs Committee report said.

Port of Turkmenbashi Begins Cargo Transport With Russian Port of Olya

Turkmenistan's Caspian Sea port of Turkmenbashi has started shipping cargo to the Russian port of Olya on the Turkmenistan-flagged ferry Bagtyyar, according to a report from the Turkmen Sea and River Routes (Turkmendeñizderýaýollary) Agency. The agency calls this voyage an important step towards the development of trade relations between Turkmenistan and Russia -- and an opportunity for the national merchant fleet to deliver perishable goods to their destination on time. The Bagtyyar, which according to Marine Optima was built in 2015 and has a summer deadweight tonnage (DWT) of just over 3,300 tons, is equipped with modern safety and navigation systems which guarantee cargo safety. Additionally, the Turkmen side says it's ready to open a shipping route for grain crops to be transited from the southern regions of Russia through the Caspian Sea to the countries of the Persian Gulf and other markets. At the port of Turkmenbashi, goods can be transshipped through the free zone without customs fees for up to three years. 2018 saw the opening of the port of Turkmenbashi, which increased access to markets throughout the Middle East and Europe. The project, worth $1.5 billion, was carried out by Gap Inşaat, a company based in Turkey. With the exception of oil products, the port can handle 17 million tons of different types of cargo annually. Four terminals (general cargo, container, bulk cargo and car ferries) are located on an area of more than 150 hectares.

Traffickers of Human Organs Detained in Kyrgyzstan

The State Committee for National Security (SCNS) of Kyrgyzstan has detained members of an international criminal group at Manas Airport. The criminals had organized a black-market channel for the illegal sale of human organs abroad. All detainees are citizens of the Kyrgyzstan. According to the investigation, the criminal group looked for patients in foreign clinics who were willing to pay large sums of money for the transplantation of a healthy organ. The gang then found donors in Kyrgyzstan, who were fraudulently induced into undergoing organ-harvesting operations. "Donors necessarily underwent a medical examination, where, regardless of [their overall health], always issued a positive conclusion, after which the organizers through corrupt schemes made false documents on the relationship with the patient necessary for submission to the clinic, where the operation will be held," said the SCNS. Investigators found that the donors received between $1,000 and $7,000 for their kidneys. The recruiters of those donors earned about $3,000, and the organizers of the criminal channel received between $30,000 and $70,000. The SCNS said that all necessary measures are currently being taken to identify all those involved in this crime. Earlier this year, Kyrgyz president Sadyr Zhaparov signed a law on the protection of citizens' health, according to which private and public hospitals can engage in organ transplantation. However, a major stipulation requires that the organ recipient must be a relative of the donor. This loophole in the legislation was exploited by criminals by issuing fictitious documents on family kinship.

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