• KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09427 0.11%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 210

Petition against ‘LGBT Propaganda’ in Kazakhstan: Opinions and Comments

A recent petition against so-called "LGBT propaganda", which gathered more than 50 thousand signatures, has resonated throughout Kazakhstan. According to legislation, the Ministry of Culture and Information is now obliged to consider this petition. The petition ‘We are Against Open and Concealed LGBT Propaganda’ authored by Kazakhstan’s Parents’ Union, followed the block in January, of a LGBT community website which the Ministry of Culture claimed to contain information “harmful to the health and development of children.” Reporting on the issue, TCA quoted the reactions of various public figures, including Khalida Azhigulova, a human rights activist and lawyer who pronouncing the petition illegal, claimed it transmitted “hatred and intolerance toward an entire social group.” She also asserted that “a ban on so-called LGBT propaganda would be a gross violation of Kazakhstan’s international human rights obligations.” Echoing her sentiment, feminist and activist Aigerim Kusayynkgzy, stated, “In terms of human rights, I hope such inhumane laws will not be passed.” Bagila Baltabaeva, head of the group leading the petition, reiterated its stance that through books, films, TV and social media, “same-sex love is being openly forced on our children,” promoting “unhealthy relationships.” She also warned that “those who work up the courage and speak out against LGBT propaganda are branded as retrogrades and conservatists.” Public reaction has been mixed and whilst many citizens have openly expressed their views, many have chosen to remain quiet for fear of repercussions and prejudice. TCA took to the streets to gauge current response. All contributors expressed a wish to remain anonymous. I was extremely concerned after reading this news. But at the same time, since I am sure that the president sees only democracy and approximation to European values as the way forward for our country’s development, I am not too worried about it. Kostanai advertiser  I think this is a bogus petition, accepted under the guise of a "hearing" state run by a  government that only purports to pay attention to the opinion of its citizens. I am sure that the majority voted on a voluntary-coercive basis, as is often the case. Many of those who voted, I believe, are civil servants, at whose expense such a large number – of signatures - was gained. This petition will be accepted because that's what the government wants. Other petitions which also garner 50 thousand votes, but not in the hands of the government, are for some reason never accepted. Taraz singer I have mixed feelings, but above all, am shocked by the level of response. How can it be that so many people are unhappy enough to willingly sign such a petition? Our country is riddled with problems in more urgent need of petitions. Almaty journalist In my opinion, there is no such thing as ‘LGBT propaganda’. One cannot become subsumed by the LGBT community through its exposure on TV or the Internet: a person is either born that way or not. Such a law will reduce the public presence of "non-traditional" relationships in society, but not...

Controversial Petition on “LGBT Propaganda” Passes Threshold for Consideration in Kazakhstan

A petition against so-called “LGBT propaganda” has received more than 50,000 signatures, meaning Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Culture and Information must consider it. However, a number of experts believe that restrictions on the gay community would damage Kazakhstan’s image. In addition, the petition’s authors are known for their controversial initiatives.  The Kazakhstan Parents' Union is the author of the petition “We are Against Open and Concealed LGBT Propaganda in the Republic of Kazakhstan,” which was published on the official E-Petition.kz portal. According to Article 90-4 of the Administrative Procedural Code, the government must consider a petition with 50,000 signatures. A working group including interested parties, government agencies, and public associations will be created. The consideration of official petitions are a relatively recent innovation. So far, only three have collected the required number of signatures. The first came in the wake of the Nukenova murder at the hands of a disgraced former minister.  It was considered by the Kazakhstan president himself and brought about landmark legislation on domestic violence. The decision to allow public input via petitions is seen as a sign of the fulfillment of President Tokayev's promise of a more engaging and aware "listening state." Kazakhstan has seen repeated attempts to include in various legislative acts such a ban on promoting “nontraditional relations.” However, these amendments were not adopted, though numerous Mazhilis (lower chamber of parliament) deputies and public figures spoke out in favor of them. Nevertheless, there have been cases in Kazakhstan where media products containing what is deemed “homosexual content” did not reach the market. For example, in 2022, the former Minister of Culture and Information, Dauren Abaev, announced that, "In response to numerous requests from citizens and the media, I inform you, the animated film Lightyear will not be shown in Kazakhstan." Officially, however, the ministry did not prohibit the screening of the Hollywood animation in cinemas. According to rumors, distributors themselves canceled showings in response to the public outcry. Also, in January 2024, a website for LGBT people was blocked in Kazakhstan. The site, among other things, had materials to help young people answer questions about their sexual orientation. “During monitoring of the internet resource selftanu.kz, a violation of the law was identified related to the posting of information harmful to the health and development of children,” the Ministry of Culture stated in justifying blocking the site. The head of the group pushing the current petition, Bagila Baltabaeva, stated that, “Same-sex love is being openly forced on our children. It is forced [on them] in bookstores, on TV screens, and on smartphones. Young people openly spread [information about] and promote their unhealthy relationships. Thus, stealthily and subtly, new standards of sexual relations are taking shape among young people. In parallel, it is promoted that traditional values are relics of the past, a sign of backwardness. Therefore, for fear of criticism, many remain silent. And those who work up the courage and speak out against LGBT propaganda are branded as retrogrades and conservatives.” This is not the...

Turkmenistan President’s Visit Causes Havoc in Dashoguz

According to reports published by Turkmen.news, traffic was restricted in the Dashoguz region from June 2nd due to President Serdar Berdimuhamedov's arrival to open new power plants. The head of state came to the region on June 5th, but residents endured inconvenience for three days due to safety precautions. The restrictions also affected pedestrians. On the eve of the president’s visit, houses were painted, and extra police officers were placed on duty. As stated in the report, “From June 2nd, access to Tashkhovuz from distant districts was closed. On June 3rd, the ban also affected the residents of the areas directly adjacent to the city. No one was allowed into the regional center: it doesn’t matter if a person works there, studies, or needs treatment.” Also, residents' cars in the regional center were only allowed on the road if they were painted white and were manufactured after 2015. Pedestrians were forbidden to walk freely; on June 3rd, police officers from all etraps (territorial units) were called onto duty in Dashoguz and placed at posts on central roads every hundred meters. This lasted from 6 am until 10 pm. All houses facing the main road, where the presidential motorcade passed, were hastily painted white or covered with whitewash. The work was carried out very carelessly, with no one protecting windows and doors from paint, and traces of paint were left smeared on the ground.

Residents of Turkmenistan Urged Not to Disseminate What’s Happening in the Country

In the city of Turkmenbashi, local authorities, including the khakimlik (mayor's office), the National Security Ministry (NSM), the court, the police, and elders, are holding meetings with youth and cultural workers. At these meetings, they are warned not to disseminate information about events in the country, such as natural disasters and traffic accidents, on the internet or to journalists. The meetings are hosted mainly by elders who reprimand the youth. “They demanded not to share pictures and videos of someone asking for money for a sick child and not to write comments under posts about problems,” a cultural worker said during an anonymous conversation. Meeting participants claim that the elders said, “There are no countries without faults, and faults need to be hidden.” They also emphasized that freedom on the internet should not lead to the spread of negative information. Authorities stated that citizens who distributed videos about the Ashgabat floods have already been identified, and most were cultural workers. "Cultural workers are lighthearted, and all the videos and information leaking online are mostly what you're doing. All problems come either from singers or actors, and the people following them,” a cultural worker was quoted as saying by an NSM official. The elders and representatives of the khakimlik also urged parents to monitor how their children use the internet and what sites they visit and read. Participants in the meeting were required to use VPN programs approved by the authorities and only share positive photos, videos, and messages about the country online.

Human Rights Organization Demands Release of Tajik Journalist

The Washington DC.-based human rights organization Freedom Now and the American law firm Dechert LLP have sent a letter to the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, calling for the release of the Tajik journalist and human rights activist Mamadsulton Mavlonazarov. The letter says that the 72-year-old Mavlonazarov, also known as Muhammadi Sulton, was imprisoned for criticizing Tajikistan's authorities. The journalist, a former state security colonel, was arrested in 2022 and sentenced to seven and a half years in prison on charges of publicly calling for a violent change in the constitutional order, and insulting representatives of the authorities through the media or the internet. In their appeal to the UN, the signees state that Mavlonazarov's current condition is unsatisfactory, and voice fears for his health. He has severe swelling of his legs and kidney problems, due to which he has been hospitalized several times. “We hope that the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention will conclude that Mavlonazarov's detention violates his fundamental right to freedom of expression, in violation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and he should be released,” the letter reads. It is also reported that after he resigned from the state security agencies, Mavlonazarov became a journalist, and was repeatedly threatened for his critical articles, which were published on his Facebook page. Human rights activists claim that he was convicted for his posts and comments about the May 2022 events in the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAR). Mavlonazarov's detention came in June 2022 after he sharply criticized Tajik security forces' “counter-terrorism” operation in Rushan district and Khorog, which, according to official figures, resulted in 16 deaths and, according to independent sources, about 40. A month earlier, the Tajik authorities had announced the “neutralization of an organized criminal group” in GBAR.

Uzbekistan Representative Elected to UN Human Rights Committee for First Time

Academician Akmal Saidov, director of the National Center for Human Rights in Uzbekistan, has been elected as a member of the UN Human Rights Committee for the 2025-2028 term. Uzbekistan is the first Central Asian country to join this key UN committee. The election took place on May 29 at the United Nations headquarters in New York, during the 40th session of the member states of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Nine members were elected to the Human Rights Committee for the 2025-2028 term. In addition to Uzbekistan, candidates from 16 other countries vied for the nine available seats. In the secret ballot, Saidov received the most votes from the member states of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The Human Rights Committee is a UN body composed of independent experts who monitor the implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights by its member states. There are 173 countries in this pact, which Uzbekistan joined in 1995. The committee's role is to ensure that civil and political rights are fully respected.

Start typing to see posts you are looking for.