• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 308

Migrant Laborers in Russia Deprived of Free Medical Care

Citizens of Tajikistan and Uzbekistan working in Russia will not be able to count on free medical care until 2026 within the framework of compulsory medical insurance (CMI), according to a report by the Ministry of Health of Russia. Based on agreements with the republics, citizens can be employed only if they acquire voluntary medical insurance (VMI) policies or with the employer's guarantee to pay for medical care at his or her own expense. Migrants can only receive free emergency medical care. The Crocus City Hall terrorist attack prompted the Russian Interior Ministry to take a number of restrictive measures relating to migrants. Among the planned changes are a reduction in the term of temporary stays by foreigners to 90 days per calendar year, introduction of mandatory biometric identification at entry, and the creation of digital profiles for foreigners. There are also more radical proposals. For example, Sergei Mironov, chairman of the Just Russia - For Truth political party, said that he believes it's necessary to introduce a visa regime between Russia and Central Asian countries. Labor migrants remain one of the most vulnerable parts of the population, and Uzbekistan has in recent years taken a number of measures to protect their interests both inside and outside the country. A recent decree by President Shavkat Mirziyoyev provides for reimbursement of expenses for taking qualification exams in foreign languages and professional trades of up to $80, for applying for a work visa of up to $134, and for buying travel tickets of up to $53. In addition, migrants are provided with subsidies for insurance for the migrant laborer and his or her family members, as well as guaranteed free medical examinations for them. Workers abroad whose rights may have been violated can count on free legal counsel. They can also contact 24-hour migrant support call centers in case of difficult situations. The Ministry of Employment of Uzbekistan is currently negotiating the opening of representative offices or centers in Great Britain (London), Germany (Berlin), Turkey (Istanbul) and Saudi Arabia (Riyadh) to provide legal assistance to migrant workers. The state employs workers returning from labor migration or provides subsidies to start their own businesses.

Turkey Cancels Visa-Free Regime for Citizens of Tajikistan

From 20 April, citizens of Tajikistan will have to obtain a visa to travel to the Republic of Turkey. That's according to a decree signed by Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The reasons for this decision remain unclear, but it's noted that the visa regime is a temporary measure. Entry documents will be issued in Dushanbe and at other Turkish diplomatic missions. Those traveling through Turkey in transit will not require a visa. Tajik Foreign Ministry spokesman, Shohin Samadi, said as of April 6, Dushanbe had not received an official notification from Turkey regarding the introduction of a visa regime. Nevertheless, he said, the issue of retaliatory measures for Turkish citizens is being worked out.  Up until this juncture, residents of the two countries could stay on the territory of the other for up to 30 days without a visa. Some Russian media rushed to link these innovations with the March 2024 terrorist attack at the Crocus City Hall, which killed 144 people and injured 551. Among the 11 people arrested on suspicion of the terrorist attack, the majority are citizens of Tajikistan. According to various sources, the cell of Islamic State (ISIS) in Afghanistan - also known as "Wilayat Khorasan" - which claimed responsibility for the incident, was training terrorists inside of Turkey. To that point, Turkish newspaper Hurriyet wrote that two supporters of ISIS who were planning to carry out a attack were detained in Istanbul. Among them was a 37-year-old citizen of Tajikistan. On March 26, Turkish Interior Minister, Ali Yerlikaya, said that 147 people were detained on suspicion of links with the terrorist organization. Following the attack on the Crocus City Hall near Moscow, Tajiks in Russia faced a wave of aggression and hatred. Tajikistan's Government is urging its citizens to avoid traveling to Russia unless necessary, and in light of possible Russian rule changes targeting migrant workers from Central Asia, many Tajiks and others may be ready to leave Russia.

Authorities in Central Asia Warn Against Terrorist Recruitment

Uzbekistan's Interior Ministry has issued a warning over increased instances of calls to commit terrorist acts spread via social media and messenger apps. Citizens are being implored to booby-trap public places - including shopping and entertainment centers, schools and other places of mass gathering - for large sums of money. Besides the promise of money, extremists are offering to provide weapons and send a plan of action - while the provocateurs often won't take no for an answer. The anonymous instigators - as a rule, there is no photo or number in the profile - often write with similar appeals to children and teenagers, intimidating them with fabricated stories such as having all of that person's data and personal information. "In case you receive this kind of message, please do not panic and do not send them to public chat rooms, to your acquaintances and friends, but immediately report it to the internal affairs authorities on the number 102. Block the senders and do not enter into correspondence or conversations with them," the Interior Ministry said in a statement. "There is a Cybersecurity Center within the structure of the interior agencies, which is engaged in monitoring and identifying individuals and channels spreading calls for unlawful acts. Special divisions have been created within the operational and investigative department of the internal affairs bodies, which are also engaged in activities to identify terrorist threats on the World Wide Web and punish attackers," Shokirjon Hashimov, spokesman for the operational and investigative department of the Uzbek Interior Ministry, told The Times of Central Asia. The Uzbekistan TV channel reported on the detention of a group of extremist students, who were plotting terrorist attacks in several locations in Tashkent. The attackers, who were planning to carry out a terrorist attack in the spring of 2022, were discovered in February 2021. The young men carefully thought out a plan of action and chose the Israeli embassy in Tashkent or the murder of U.S. and Chinese citizens at the capital's international airport as the target of their planned attacks. After committing the terrorist acts, the boys intended to move to Syria via Turkey, or to Afghanistan via Surkhandarya. Over the course of the investigation, explosives were found at the suspects' homes. The court sentenced them to between 10 and 15 years in prison. Calls for vigilance can also be heard in neighboring Kyrgyzstan, where through social networks and dating sites, attackers are trying to recruit young people to carry out terrorist attacks in Russia. "The representative office of the Ministry of Labor, Social Security and Migration of Kyrgyzstan in the Russian Federation warns that through social networks and popular messengers such as Telegram, there is active recruitment of citizens, including underage children, to participate in terrorist acts in Russia," the press service of the ministry reported.

Experts Warn Kazakhstan Over Possible Consequences of Further Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict

On March 31, the Azerbaijani Defense Ministry said on its website that provocations on the Armenian-Azerbaijani border have recently become more frequent - and warned the Armenian authorities that Baku could take tough retaliatory measures. The same day, the Armenian Defense Ministry on its website rejected the information that it was accumulating troops on the Armenian-Azerbaijani border. The EU Mission in Armenia also stated that “no such movements have been observed.” This turn of dialogue closely mirrors the events of autumn 2020, when there was a major military escalation. The Azerbaijani Defense Ministry then repeatedly warned Armenia against provocations in the conflict zone - and after that, hostilities started. If the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict develops, Kazakhstan will have to stop oil supplies to Europe via Azerbaijan, as the country is a member of the regional Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), notes economist Galym Khusainov. "It is necessary to prepare a plan of action in case the conflict intensifies and Kazakhstan's oil supplies through Azerbaijan may be cut off," he told the Times of Central Asia. Furthermore, Kazakhstan could face major losses if investments are made in developing the Zangezur transportation corridor, financier Rasul Rysmambetov said. "The most important strategy is to develop as many corridors as possible: Azerbaijan, the northern direction, the southern direction, [and] transit to Europe via Russia. In general, Kazakhstan mainly exports oil, so we just need to develop as many corridors as possible, so that the loss of one corridor or damage to one corridor will not affect the overall export of our goods," Rysmambetov told the Times of Central Asia. The conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan escalated in the early 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union, centered around the dispute over control of the Karabakh region. As a result of the First Karabakh War, the region passed to Armenian jurisdiction. In the fall of 2020, after the Second Karabakh War, Karabakh passed to Azeri control. The United Nations (UN) recognizes Karabakh as the territory of Azerbaijan. Despite the population within its borders being 94% ethnically Armenian, the Bolsheviks eventually founded the Nagorno-Karabakh Autonomous Oblast as part of Soviet Azerbaijan in 1923. Whilst there was an economic logic in allowing farmers to reach their traditional grazing lands without the hindrance of borders, the decision also owed much to divide and rule politics and a desire to please their Kemalist allies in Turkey. In 1921, the Treaty of Kars saw Moscow cede "imperialist" Western Armenia to Turkey as part of a ‘friendship and brotherhood’ agreement, the Soviets even going so far as to arm Kemalist troops. Massacres continued, and in September 1922 an estimated 100,000 Christians - 25,000 of whom were Armenians - were killed in modern-day Izmir alone. Today, the threat of war between Armenia and Azerbaijan lingers in part because the issue of political control of several villages on the Armenia-Azerbaijan border in Armenia's Syunik region remains unresolved. Azerbaijan calls these territories its historical lands, while Armenia argues that they are its territory, as...

Kyrgyzstan’s Foreign Ministry Urges Its Citizens to Temporarily Refrain From Traveling to Russia

A recommendation posted on the Kyrgyzstan Foreign Ministry website has urged its citizens to temporarily refrain From traveling to Russia in relation to the terrorist attack in Crocus City Hall near Moscow on March 22, 2024, which killed over 130 people, as well as the introduction of enhanced security measures throughout Russia. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs asked fellow citizens who do not have good reasons and urgent business in Russia to refrain from traveling to Russia as long as the additional security measures and increased control of passage across the border are still in place. For those who have already planned their trip, the foreign ministry recommends checking for restrictions under their name on the website of the Russian Interior Ministry. "Citizens who have [committed] two or more administrative offenses during their previous stay on the territory of the Russian Federation, refrain from traveling to its territory to avoid not passing through the state border and the consequences associated with this procedure,"  reads a warning on the website of the Foreign Ministry. Furthermore, Kyrgyz diplomats recommend that citizens who are already in Russia refrain from visiting mass gatherings of any kind, as well as carry identification documents and the documents that confirm the legality of their stay in the Russian Federation. The Foreign Ministry warned that citizens should comply with the legal requirements of Russian security forces as part of their mandate to ensure public safety. "In case of emergency questions, citizens should contact the hotline of the Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic in Moscow at +7 925 115 50 47, as well as the Consular Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kyrgyz Republic at +996 999 312 002," reads the statement. Russian authorities have stepped up security measures in many cities after the terrorist attack in the Moscow region that killed 139 people and injured 182 others, according to the latest figures. Tajik passports were found on the suspected perpetrators of the mass shooting, making Russian citizens and law enforcement more suspicious of Tajikistani nationals and citizens of neighboring Central Asian countries. After the terrorist attack, checks on citizens of all Central Asian countries in Russia have intensified. There is also talk of strengthening migration control in Russia.

Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan Agree to Further Border-Demarcation Protocol

From 12 - 17 March, Tajik and Kyrgyz topographic working groups and legal groups serving under the respective government delegations convened to in Tajikistan's Sughd region. According to a report by the Tajik State Committee for National Security, discussion in Buston focused on the demarcation and delimitation of Tajikistan’s and Kyrgyzstan’s state borders. During the meeting, an agreement was signed by topographical working groups to codify 10.76 kilometres of the Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan state border. The two parties then voted to continue working on defining the remaining portions of the common state border at a subsequent meeting to be held in Kyrgyzstan. Back in February, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Tajikistan Sirojiddin Mukhriddin said that almost 200 kilometres of the common line of the Tajikistan-Kyrgyz state border had been agreed upon, leaving roughly 100 kilometres of the area under dispute.

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