• KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01137 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09283 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 79

Kyrgyz Pharmacists Speak Against Abolition of Tax Exemptions

Kyrgyzstan's Ministry of Economy and Commerce has submitted for public discussion a draft law abolishing tax exemptions for importers and manufacturers of some medicines. The ministry believes that by abolishing preferences, the government will increase aid to citizens in need. "We will start to collect taxes on medicines. Help those who need it. There are lists of patients who need surgery, who have severe diagnoses," Kubanychbek Isabekov, head of the ministry's tax policy department, said during the debate. However, representatives of Kyrgyzstan's pharmaceutical union believe that abolishing the benefits will lead to higher drug prices. This could increase social tension in the country, as well as lead to a rise in the number of counterfeit medicines. The bill to abolish drug benefits is crude and unfinished, politician Venera Raimbachayeva commented. She said that the government wants the rich to pay taxes on drugs, but feels the measure won't work. "We should not forget that rich people are not treated in Kyrgyzstan, they are treated abroad. And only ordinary people will suffer from this. You are prying into the pockets of the population with this law," the deputy said. The bill will soon be considered at a sitting of the Kyrgyz parliament.  

Kyrgyzstan President Announces New Social Welfare Measures

In his address at the National Congress on Social Mobilization on 22 May, Kyrgyzstan President Sadyr Japarov announced several initiatives aimed at raising the standard of living of the country’s citizens. The event was attended by participants of a nationwide Social Contract program through which the Ministry of Labor, Social Security and Migration provides grants of 100 thousand soms/ $1,130, to low-income families wishing to open small businesses. Launched three years ago, the program has enabled some 13,000 people to develop their businesses, created jobs, and generally enhanced the livelihoods of families and local communities. Highly effective, the initiative has to date, benefited over 70,000 people across the country. In addition to a government allocation of 2 billion soms to maintain the program, the president announced plans to boost the economy and improve the wellbeing of Kyrgyzstan citizens, by establishing new enterprises, industrial facilities and in turn, more jobs. President Japarov stated that the Cabinet of Ministers and local authorities had been tasked to support entrepreneurs at all levels from small workshops, fruit processing plants and retail outlets to tourist bed and breakfast services and cafes. To ease the financial burden on small and medium-sized businesses, the president announced a reduction in social tax from 27 percent to 12 percent. In addition, the president has introduced a strict moratorium on inspections of businesses to further support entrepreneurs. Referencing amendments to the Constitution made in 2021 which guaranteed that pensions would not fall below the minimum living wage, the head of state announced that from 1 October, 2024, pensions in Kyrgyzstan will exceed the minimum living wage of 6,800 soms/ $77. The president confirmed the government’s commitment to its provision affordable housing and reported that the construction of multi-storey buildings through the State Mortgage Company has enabled public sector employees and private individuals alike, to obtain mortgages on apartments. He continued by stating that 11,495 apartments are currently being built across the country and the construction of 12,000 apartments will begin before the end of this year. In the healthcare sector, the president has instructed that from 1 July, the number of doctors participating in the program to locate medics in remote areas, small towns, and villages, is to increase from 200 to 500. Regarding the shortage of doctors in the regions, the president has approved the introduction of an additional monthly payment of 20,000 soms/ $226 to paediatricians, neonatologists, surgeons, anaesthesiologists, and resuscitation doctors working outside Bishkek

NGOs in Kyrgyzstan Have Two Months to Register as “Foreign Agents”

Kyrgyzstan's Ministry of Justice has approved the creation of a register for "non-governmental organizations performing the functions of a foreign representative", which gives authorities the right to inspect their activities. All non-profit agencies that receive foreign funding have been given two months from 16 May to submit documents to the ministry. Kyrgyz president Sadyr Zhaparov signed the law "on Foreign Representatives" on April 2, despite over 100 organizations and civil society figures appealing for him not to do so. Zhaparov made assurances at the time that non-governmental organizations would not be persecuted. Local NGOs funded from abroad that are engaged in political activities in Kyrgyzstan are now recognized as "performing the functions of a foreign representative", and are placed in a separate register. Organizations included in this register -- so-called 'foreign agents' -- may be subjected to various unscheduled inspections. Several international organizations, as well as the United States and certain countries in the European Union, have voiced criticisms of the new law. After it came into force, the Soros-Kyrgyzstan Foundation announced that it would be terminating its activities in Kyrgyzstan.

An Uneasy Calm After Unrest in Bishkek

On the night of May 18, riots took place in Bishkek. The reason - a fight between foreign medical students and local youth. The trigger was a video of a scuffle, which occurred on May 13, when Egyptian citizens beat several locals. This video was then widely circulated on social networks. Local politicians have stated that they believe the situation was fueled from the outside.   What happened? On the night of May 18, protesters blocked several streets in the center of Bishkek. According to the Interior Ministry, the number of people continued to grow, and there was a threat of mass disorder, so all personnel from the capital's police were placed on alert. All hostels and dormitories in the city where foreign citizens live were put under guard. The protesters expressed dissatisfaction with the large number of migrants coming into the country from Egypt, Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh. The head of Kyrgyzstan's National Security Committee said law enforcement agencies detained several provocateurs who were calling for the overthrow of the government. By morning, the participants in the unauthorized rally had been dispersed. In total, about 1,000 people took part in the unrest, according to the capital's police. Law enforcement urged citizens not to give in to provocations and show a high-level of civil responsibility. The Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic reported that following the incident, 41 people sought medical assistance in Bishkek. Four Egyptians were detained - local media claim they were participants in the conflict that took place on May 13. Later, it became known that some Kyrgyz citizens had also been detained. The confrontation between local residents and foreigners has acquired an international dimension, with a number of government agencies in neighboring countries expressing their concern. For example, Kazakhstan introduced a special regime on the border with Kyrgyzstan. The authorities in Pakistan, meanwhile, have organized emergency flights, and a number of their students and workers are leaving Kyrgyzstan. Several thousand students from India, Pakistan, Egypt, Bangladesh and Nepal study at Bishkek's medical institutes. There are also migrant workers from these countries living in the country, who are mainly employed in the production of garments.   Who benefits from the unrest? According to deputy Dastan Bekeshev of the Jokorku Kenesh, the unrest is an attempt to find the authorities' vulnerabilities. "One of the indicators of economic growth is when citizens of the country hire foreign citizens as workers. And there is no way for us to avoid conflicts with foreign citizens. Conflicts are also arranged by our own citizens abroad. Of course, guests should not forget that they are guests and must coexist peacefully with the citizens of the country they are in. But we should also learn tolerance and wisdom when various conflicts occur. There are law enforcement agencies and they have every opportunity to punish a foreigner and expel him from Kyrgyzstan for a long time. Our laws on external migration are very strict," the parliamentarian wrote on his Telegram channel. The MP said...

Tension Spills Into Streets of Bishkek After Fight Involving Foreigners

Police in riot gear deployed in part of Kyrgyzstan’s capital overnight as large crowds gathered in anger over an alleged fight between local and foreign people which was widely circulated on social media. The Kyrgyz government later reported that 28 people, including three foreigners had been injured in the incident, whilst four foreign citizens were arrested for incitement. The crowds milled around some intersections of Bishkek for hours before dispersing early Saturday, and the Ministry of Internal Affairs said the situation was stable. Riot police cordoned off areas where the mobs had gathered and negotiated with the protesters in order to head off any further confrontations. The incident appeared to reflect tension over the presence in Kyrgyzstan of migrants. Kyrgyzstan’s Ministry of Internal Affairs is taking steps to tighten monitoring and penalties for foreigners who violate immigration laws, Kaktus Media reported. The fight which led to the wider conflagration happened at a hostel on May 13. Rumors spread on social media, and a video showing Kyrgyz students fighting with medical students from Egypt went viral. People started gathering on Friday night to show their dissatisfaction with what they said was the lax treatment of foreigners involved in the fight. However, police said three foreigners were detained on suspicion of hooliganism, the AKIpress news outlet reported. It said the suspects appeared in a video, apologizing for the fight and saying they would accept their punishment. “All measures were taken in a timely manner, they were detained, legal measures will be taken against them,” said Azamat Toktonaliev, head of Bishkek´s Internal Affairs Directorate. He told AKIpress that Kyrgyz citizens were invited to testify as witnesses and were not detained. Kyrgyzstan has expressed concern about the plight of some of its own citizens who travel to Russia in search of employment and have faced official scrutiny and sporadic harassment there. In the wake of the violence, diplomatic delegations from Pakistan and India have advised their students in Bishkek to stay indoors.

Bishkek Bets on Bikes and Buses

To alleviate congestion and traffic bottlenecks in the capital, the Bishkek Mayor's Office has green-lit a strategic plan for enhancing the city's road transport infrastructure over the 2024-2030 period. This initiative, as detailed on the municipal website, encompasses an ambitious range of projects. Highlights include the construction of bridges and new road junctions, the introduction of bike lanes within the road network, the consolidation of dedicated lanes into a coherent system, the expansion of parking facilities including an increase in bicycle parking spaces, and the establishment of transport hubs and park-and-ride lots. The vision driving these efforts is to significantly reduce car dependency in Bishkek, promoting instead a robust network of public and bicycle transport options. Plans are underway to construct seven park-and-ride facilities around the city’s perimeter, encouraging commuters to opt for public transport upon entering Bishkek. City officials have consistently advocated for strategies to lower rampant smog levels and congestion, including proposals to limit private car access into the city based on a vehicle's license plate number. Furthermore, the Mayor's Office announced plans to establish at least two advanced transport and transfer hubs at key entry points into Bishkek. These hubs will serve as critical junctions for intercity and regional bus routes, facilitating seamless connections with the city's public transport system. By 2030, these initiatives aim to achieve a 20% reduction in car usage within the city and cut congestion by 30%.

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