• KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01153 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00215 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09417 0%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 51

ADB Funds Wastewater Management and Sustainable Tourism in Issyk-Kul, Kyrgyzstan

On June 24, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) announced its provision of $56 million to improve wastewater management and enhance sustainable and inclusive tourism in Kyrgyzstan’s Issyk-Kul region. The funding comprises a $25 million concessional loan and a $31 million Asian Development Fund (ADF) grant. The Issyk-Kul region, with its rich ecological and biological diversity and Issyk-Kul Lake, has long been a popular tourist destination, with some 80% of holidaymakers choosing to stay at the lakeside resort of Cholpon-Ata. However, due to its age, the town’s wastewater network currently serves just half of the permanent population and excludes almost a third of tourism facilities. To address the issue, ADB funds will be invested in a climate-resilient infrastructure including a wastewater treatment plant, pumping stations, and improved sewer infrastructure, serving Cholpon-Ata's  main resorts, guesthouses, residential and business sectors. In tandem with helping preserve the environment around the lake, the initiative will support local authorities in developing a climate-resilient tourism master plan for the area. The project will also boost the area's tourism infrastructure through the creation of a museum and information centre, improving and conserving the local archaeological heritage site, constructing bike trails and walking paths around the lake's shoreline, upgrading three public parks, and facilitating access to green spaces. ADB Director General for Central and West Asia Yevgeniy Zhukov commented: “Economic growth can be driven by low-carbon tourism built on sound environmental practices and climate-resilient infrastructure. ADB’s project addresses critical challenges faced by Cholpon-Ata’s tourism industry. By integrating environmental improvements and wastewater investments with tourism infrastructure, we are helping shift Kyrgyz Republic to a low-carbon growth trajectory.”    

Kazakhstan’s Irrigation Water to be Swelled by 560 Million Cubic Meters from Kyrgyzstan

On June 18, Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation announced that during this year’s irrigation season, the country will receive 180 million cubic meters of water from the Shu River and 380 million cubic meters of water from the Talas River from upstream Kyrgyzstan. As reported by Kazakh Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Nurzhan Nurzhigitov, the agreement between the two countries was reached during the 33rd meeting of the Shu-Talas Water Commission. Agreements were also settled on the extent of work required on the repair and reconstruction of water management facilities located on the transboundary Shu and Talas rivers. Welcoming the decisions, Minister Nurzhigitov commented: “International cooperation is one of our ministry’s key goals. In preparation for the irrigation season, a lot of work has been undertaken to provide farmers in the south of Kazakhstan with necessary volumes of water, and important negotiations have taken place with neighbouring countries. Today’s agreement with the Ministry of Water Resources of Kyrgyzstan to increase water supply along the Shu and Talas rivers, will be implemented from June 21.” The agreement follows that between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan for the supply of 922 million cubic meters of water to the former through the Dostyk interstate canal.    

Water Shortages in Kyrgyzstan’s Cities Despite Full Reservoirs

Due to a shortage, Kyrgyz authorities have banned the use of drinking water to irrigate cities' gardens and orchards. Implemented in Bishkek and Osh, the ban which operates during daytime hours, is set to run until the end of the summer. In a report to TCA,  Erlan Timurov, chief public relations specialist for Bishkekgorvodokanal, the company in charge of drinking water in Bishkek, stated: "Every year, Bishkekvodokanal produces about 145 million cubic meters of drinking water, around  48m cubic meters of which are lost as a result of  illegal connections to our networks and leaks caused by worn-out infrastructure" The situation is similar in southern Kyrgyzstan and in Osh, utility companies in the course of monitoring levels, regularly identify and cut off water supplies to those illegally  connected to the system. "The average daily consumption of drinking water in residential areas increases fivefold in summer," explained Timurov. "Most of this increase is spent on watering vegetable gardens and filling swimming pools. As a result, some residents experience water shortages." Ironically, the water deficit is developing against a backdrop of overflowing local reservoirs caused partly by abnormal weather melting mountain glaciers. Under the circumstances, the Tien Shan High Mountain Research Centre at the Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower in Kyrgyzstan blames cities' water shortages on irrational use. "In the 1980s , collective and state farms universally introduced the so-called sprinkler system. Back then,  500 to 1,000 cubic meters of water were required to irrigate one hectare.  Today, that has risen to  2 to 3 thousand cubic meters. The problem is that we have lost many technologies and do not know how to use water effectively," claimed  the scientific center. Drip irrigation used worldwide, is now being introduced in Kyrgyzstan. However, because  it's expensive, the percentage of Kyrgyz farmers using this type of irrigation is extremely small and the majority  continue their habit of using drinking water in their fields, gardens, and orchards using outdated irrigation systems .

Kyrgyzstan’s Eco-Activists Question Official Data on Rare Animals

According to the state gold mining company Kumtor,  operating near the Sarychat-Ertash high-mountain reserve, the number of red-listed animals has increased significantly as a result of ecological  improvements to their environment.  Local ecologists, however, believe that the data has been intentionally exaggerated. In its report, Kumtor said, "Annual monitoring of the state of biodiversity, conducted by the company, allows us to accurately track the ecological situation on the ground. Care for ecology and the environment is also evident in the increasing numbers of argali, ibex, and snow leopards. For example, the number of argali in the Sarychat-Ertash reserve increased from 750 to 2,500, making it the country's largest population. Capricorns, argali, and snow leopards have also increased in number." Environmental scientists at the National Academy of Sciences of Kyrgyzstan (NAS KR) state that whilst a rough count of red-listed animals in hunting farms and state nature reserves shows an increase in all argali and snow leopard subspecies,  the state authorities have not provided an accurate calculation for 14 years. "All hunting farms of the republic every year give the state structures data on the number of argali, ibex, and other red-listed animals. According to their data, the number of animals is growing, but how much this data can be believed remains a question. They are interested parties and may present distorted data,” Askar Davletbayev, an ecologist with the National Academy of Sciences, told The Times of Central Asia. In Kyrgyzstan, the state protects argali and snow leopards. During the hunting season, however, authorities issue a yearly license to shoot the animals. A popular and lucrative  sport, it attracts visitors from all over the world who willingly pay around 10 thousand dollars to bag an argali. According to eco-activist Vlad Ushakov, the fact that predatory animals living on high mountain ranges have begun to descend to the lower reaches to hunt, has also impacted the figures. "This does not speak of an increase in snow leopards but rather a lack of prey; the forage base has been undermined. In the gorges, where wild animals traditionally used to graze, there is now mass grazing. The snow leopard will not voluntarily change its natural habitat. Ten years ago, we were told there were 300-350 leopards in Kyrgyzstan; today, the same figures apply. Perhaps these are just invented figures with no basis,” Ushakov explained to TCA.

Kyrgyzstan and IFC Sign Agreement on Two Solar Power Plant Projects

On 10 June, the Ministry of Energy and the Ministry of Economy and Commerce of the Kyrgyz Republic signed an agreement with the International Finance Corporation (IFC) on the implementation of two solar power plant projects in the country’s Batken and Talas regions. According to the Ministry of Economy and Commerce, the agreement is a continuation of cooperation between the Kyrgyz government and IFC on the construction of solar power plants with a total capacity of up to 500 MW in Kyrgyzstan. In the first phase of this collaboration, IFC helped the Kyrgyz Republic conduct a comprehensive analysis for a pilot project for a 100-150 MW solar power plant planned in the Kochkor district of Naryn region, and is currently helping to attract private investors in its implementation. The second stage will include two solar plants, each with a capacity of 100-150 MW, in the Batken and Talas regions.  

Donor Coordination Committee Established for Kyrgyzstan’s Kambarata HPP-1 Project

The Kyrgyz Republic International Energy Investment Forum, held in Vienna, on June 10, concluded with the establishment of a Donor Coordination Committee for the construction of Kambarata HPP-1 hydropower plant in Kyrgyzstan. The Kyrgyz Cabinet of Ministers said that the doors are open to interested parties but to date, the committee comprises major international financial institutions and development partners, including the World Bank, the OPEC Fund, the Asian Development Bank, the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the Islamic Development Bank, and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. The Committee’s first meeting is scheduled for autumn this year. An inter-ministerial agreement on cooperation on the Kambarata HPP-1 project was also signed by the Ministries of Energy of the Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan. Summarizing the outcome of the forum, Chairman of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic Akylbek Japarov announced: “We have made significant progress in establishing contacts and a common understanding of further actions. I am confident that the created Donor Coordination Committee will be a continuation of actions to implement the national project — the construction of Kambarata HPP-1.” Japarov told forum participants that “According to experts, by 2050 the population in Central Asia will increase by 27%, the demand for food by 35%, and the consumption of drinking water by 50%. At the same time, water is the main artery of life in the countries of the Central Asian region. Countries located at the sources of large rivers account for 80.7% of the region’s total water flow.” Regarding different countries’ priorities for water usage - downstream Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan use water in irrigation mode in summer, and upstream Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, in energy mode in winter -he warned “This situation affects the energy and food security in the region.” He then provided a more detailed report on the Kambarata HPP-1 project: “Kambarata HPP-1 is located at the source of the glaciers. Effective operation of this power plant will allow the accumulation and rational use of water resources of the Toktogul reservoir. The Kambarata HPP-1 construction project has broad economic, environmental, and social benefits and prospects for both Kyrgyzstan and the Central Asian region. The project will provide the Kyrgyz Republic and Central Asia with clean energy at the lowest cost, which entails lower costs of the energy transition in the region. Electricity generation at hydroelectric power plants will reduce emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere.” Reiterating the project’s key importance in meeting the growing demand for energy and increasing energy security in the region, Japarov continued: “The power plant will be sited in the upper reaches of the Naryn River. Its installed capacity will be 1,860 megawatts with an average annual generation of 5.6 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity. The preliminary construction estimate is more than $4 billion. The master plan of Kambarata HPP-1 includes a rock-fill dam, a hydroelectric power plant building with four hydraulic units, construction and operational spillways and transport tunnels, a residential village [for personnel], a reservoir and water treatment facilities.” He confirmed...

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