• KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 49 - 54 of 117

USAID Supports Uzbekistan’s First Green Hydrogen Hub

According to a statement issued by the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan on February 29th, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is set to introduce a new initiative to support Uzbekistan’s clean energy objectives. Under Uzbekistan’s “Strategy for the Development of Renewable and Hydrogen Energy,” the region has a target to increase its generation of renewable energy (solar, wind, and hydro) by 25 percent by 2030, and carbon neutrality by 2050. To support the government’s goals and with the collaboration of the Uzbek Ministry of Energy and energy sector stakeholders, USAID has announced the launch a Green Hydrogen Hub. Edward Michalski, Acting Director of USAID Mission to Uzbekistan, reported, “USAID is committed to supporting the Central Asian countries in the pursuit of clean energy development and other energy priorities, as not just a goal, but a necessity.” By helping to further the energy sector’s expertise in clean energy technologies, the Hub will play an important role in shaping the region’s future energy landscape. A new curriculum on green hydrogen established by USAID in partnership with the University of Delaware, USA, and Tashkent State Technical University, has now been incorporated into a master’s degree program.

Kazakhstan Seeks U.S. Cooperation to Develop Critical Minerals

During a visit to the United States on March 1st, Kazakhstan’s Minister of Industry and Construction, Kanat Sharlapaev met David Applegate, director of the U.S. Geological Survey, to discuss expanding bilateral cooperation regarding mineral deposits in Kazakhstan. Of Kazakhstan’s 50 types of minerals, 17 were identified by the U.S. Geological Survey as critical. As reported by Sharlapaev, the key aims of future collaborations are attracting investment in geological exploration, mining, and the processing of rare and rare-earth metals, as well as facilitating Kazakhstan's integration to the global market through cutting-edge technologies and expertise. Speaking at a roundtable discussion at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce with members of the Kazakh-American Business Council (USKZBC) and representatives of American companies, the minister outlined the benefits afforded by consolidating the partnership between Kazakhstan and the USA. Emphasis was placed on the strategic potential of mining rare and rare earth metals and the development of related industries. In particular, he cited the importance of creating a cluster of industries in Kazakhstan to produce raw materials for batteries, including nickel, cobalt, manganese, and lithium and with reference to reforms on the use of subsoil to attract investment, encouraged US mining companies to participate in forthcoming auctions in Kazakhstan.

French Company to Build a Solar Plant in Uzbekistan

Attended by Uzbek President Shavkat Mirziyoyev, a ground-breaking ceremony for the construction of a solar power plant with a capacity of 100 megawatts took place in Uzbekistan’s Khorezm region on February 29th. Built by the French company Voltalia, the new photovoltaic plant will generate 254 million kilowatt-hours of green energy per annum and increase the volume of electricity generated in Khorezm by 30%. In addition to providing 11% of the region's annual electricity consumption by the end of the year, the new plant will save 76 million cubic meters of natural gas and prevent the release of 106 thousand tons of harmful substances into the atmosphere. The project will also harness agrovoltaics technology and by combining energy production and agriculture, allow crops to be grown under solar panels for the first time in Uzbekistan. In discussion with Sébastien Clerc, CEO of Voltalia, President Mirziyoyev emphasized his support of both the Khorezm project and the construction of a hybrid power plant in the Bukhara region, and reiterated the extent to which such innovative projects strengthen multifaceted cooperation between Uzbekistan and France.

Green Energy as a New Driver of Uzbekistan’s Economy

At a government meeting chaired by President Shavkat Mirziyoyev on February 28th, it was announced that in 2024, Uzbekistan will produce 13 billion kilowatt-hours of green energy via hydro, wind, and solar power plants, to generate 15% of the country’s electricity. For decades, natural gas, oil products, and coal have fuelled Uzbekistan’s electricity but in recent years, the country’s natural gas has severely depleted. In 2023, Uzbekistan registered a reduction in the production by more than 4.5 billion cubic meters, necessitating the need to import natural gas from Russia through Kazakhstan. Official statistics also recorded a decrease in the country’s oil production. At yesterday’s meeting, it was stated that the country’s potential for solar and wind energy is 10-12 times higher than the current demand for electricity. In response, the government has launched major programs to create green energy with attractive packages for investors. To date, the renewable energy sector has attracted $2.1 billion in direct foreign investment enabling the implementation of projects worth $13 billion. Solar and wind power plants are currently under construction across the country, with nine solar and wind power plants with a total capacity of 1.6 gigawatts already launched in Bukhara, Jizzakh, Kashkadarya, Navoi, Samarkand, and Surkhandarya. Rooftop solar panels with a total capacity of 457 megawatts have also been installed in commercial, public, and residential buildings. When combined, these new measures produce an additional 5 billion kilowatt-hours of green electricity to the national grid and save 1.5 billion cubic meters of natural gas. President Mirziyoyev confirmed that the government has commissioned the following to be completed over the next three years: 28 solar and wind power plants with a total capacity of 8 gigawatts, 944 kilometers of high-voltage power lines, six large substations and 18 energy storage facilities with a total capacity of 2.2 gigawatts. He also emphasized that apart from the obvious benefits to the environment, the sector’s demand from local enterprises for solar panels, transformers and other related products has resulted in green energy becoming a new driver of the national economy.

EBRD Helps Increase Reliability of Tajikistan’s Electrical Grid

An announcement was made on February 28th that the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) is to increase the reliability and sustainability of electricity supply in Tajikistan. The national transmission network operator Shabaqahoi Intiqoli Barq (SIB) will be awarded some €31 million, comprising two EBRD sovereign loans and an investment grant of up to €8 million to help restore the existing transformer and construct a new one at the Sugd-500 substation in the north of the country. The northern Tajikistan power system depends on the 500 kV Sugd-Dushanbe high-voltage line connected to the Sugd-500 substation. Once upgraded and expanded, the substation will allow for a more sustainable electrical grid able to meet domestic and export demands. It will also help SIB integrate up to 700 MW of renewables in line with Tajikistan’s 2030 National Development Strategy to diversify its energy production. In 2023, Tajikistan’s energy capacity exceeded 6,000 megawatts, and electricity production amounted to 22 billion kilowatt-hours; 4.8 billion kilowatt-hours or 28% more than in 2017. Addressing the issue last December, Tajik President Emomali Rahmon announced that the government was making sound progress in its strategy to establish a ‘green economy’. To achieve this goal, he explained that over the next seven years, Tajikistan aims to increase electricity exports to 10 billion kilowatt-hours, and by 2030, the construction of power plants employing renewable energy sources will increase the production of green energy to 1,000 megawatts. Looking ahead, the country aims to source all its electricity from renewable sources, primarily hydropower, by 2023.

World Bank to Help Increase Kyrgyzstan’s Resilience to Climate Change

A $45 million financing package for the Kyrgyz Republic Resilient Landscape Restoration Project, to be implemented until 2029, was approved by the World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors on February 27th. Complemented by a $5 million grant from the Global Partnership for Sustainable and Resilient Landscapes (PROGREEN) and a $2.4 million grant from the Korea–World Bank Partnership Facility (KWPF), the project aims to increase sustainable landscape management in selected locations in Kyrgyzstan and promote regional collaboration among Central Asian countries on transboundary landscape restoration. “We are pleased to assist the Kyrgyz Republic's Cabinet of Ministers in increasing the resilience of landscapes and communities to climate-induced hazards, and by enhancing the government’s capacity to monitor glaciers, snow cover, and mudflows, implement measures to adapt to and mitigate climate change,” announced Naveed Hassan Naqvi, World Bank Country Manager for the Kyrgyz Republic. “This project is an important step towards building a more resilient future for the people of the Kyrgyz Republic and will also have a positive impact on neighbouring countries.” The World Bank has affirmed that once in place, the project will directly benefit over 50,000 individuals in the most vulnerable, targeted rural areas of Jalal-Abad, Osh, Issyk-Kul, and Naryn, and communities located upstream of transboundary rivers. According to a 2018-19 study by the Central Asian Institute of Applied Geosciences, Kyrgyzstan’s glaciers have decreased by 16% over the past 50 years. The Ministry of Natural Resources earlier warned that many of the country’s 6,500 glaciers — which cover over 8,000 square kilometres and contain an estimated 650 cubic kilometres of freshwater — could shrink by 50% by 2050 and even completely disappear by the end of the century.

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