• KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01126 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09196 0.77%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 7 - 12 of 110

“Eco-Enthusiasts” – Tashkent Hosts Environmental Competition for Students

On April 13, an environmental awareness competition, "Eco-Enthusiasts" was held in Tashkent's Zahiriddin Muhammad Babur Central Ecopark. The event was organized in accordance with the decree of the President, "On measures for effective work of the Ministry of Ecology, Environmental Protection and Climate Change," and was timed to coincide with the Day of Ecological Knowledge, which is celebrated on April 15. Students from twelve higher educational institutions participated in the competition, demonstrating their knowledge and ability in answering a series of questions about the environment. The aim of the competition was to raise awareness of environmental issues, develop environmental culture, and disseminate information about contemporary environmental problems and the state of the environment. According to the results, first place went to the team, "Kimyogarlar," second place went to "Staticfacion," and third place went to the team, "Ecofaollar,” who all received prizes.

Chinese Invest in Solar Power for Kyrgyzstan

On April 12, the Chairman of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic, Akylbek Japarov unveiled plans for the construction of a solar power plant near Balykchy in the country’s northern Issyk-Kul region. Financed with an investment of $400 million by a Chinese company, the plant will have a capacity of 400 megawatts and should be operational by the end of 2025. At the celebratory launch, Japarov stated that the Cabinet of Ministers has made the harness of solar energy, wind, and biogas technologies a key priority, and applauded progressive initiatives which over the past two years, include large-scale hydroelectric power plants Kambarata (HPP)-1, Kulanak HPP and Bala-Saruu HPP, as well as hundreds of smaller hydroelectric power stations nationwide. “Our goal is to achieve energy independence. The first stage of work on Kambarata HPP-1 has been completed, and work is currently underway to update its feasibility. Once in operation, it will become the largest hydropower nation in the region.”

USAID Oasis Project on Course to Restore Aral Sea Ecosystem

The U.S. Embassy in Kazakhstan has announced that from 12 – 16 April, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) will visit the Oasis project on the former shores of the Aral Sea in the Kyzylorda region of Kazakhstan. Launched in 2021, the Oasis is integral to Environmental Restoration of the Aral Sea Activity (ERAS-I); a larger initiative spawned by USAID in cooperation with the Executive Directorate of the International Fund for Saving the Aral Sea. Comprising a 500-hectare demonstration site for testing black saxaul shrubs, the project represents a first step in restoring the local ecosystem and demonstrates the willingness of governments, NGOs, and local communities to collaborate on building resilience against environmental threats to Central Asia. In advance of the expedition to commemorate the project’s success and celebrate the efforts of those who contributed to its realization, U.S. Ambassador to Kazakhstan, Daniel Rosenblum, stated: “The testing and research at the Oasis will benefit not only Kazakhstan communities in this region, but will also inform ecosystem restoration efforts throughout the Aral Sea region. Working together with national and international partners, we are proud to be part of this mission to find collaborative solutions to build climate resilience in Central Asia.” The Aral Sea disaster is one of the worst ecological catastrophes in human history. Formerly the fourth largest lake in the world, the Aral Sea began shrinking in the 1960s when water from the rivers that fed it was redirected for agricultural irrigation. Today, the Aral Sea is only 10% full. The subsequent birth of the Aralkum Desert and the sand and dust storms rising from the world’s newest desert have both polluted the environment and severely affected the health in local communities.

Turkmenistan Using Almost All Available Water Resources With No Additions in Sight

Meteojournal has reported that Turkmenistan's State Statistics Committee has published a voluntary national review of its progress in implementing the global agenda for sustainable development until 2023 on its website. According to MeteoJournal, in 2021, almost all water resources in the country – 92% – went to agricultural needs. Another 5% was used by industry, and only 3% went to household needs. At the same time, Turkmenistan used almost all available fresh water resources, and due to increasing consumption, the country has no additional water sources. In 2016, the utilization rate of water resources reached 97.5%; in 2018, it had dropped to 89.9%, then in 2020 it reached 85.2%, and in 2021 -- 87.1 percent. Meteojournal stated that the increase in demand for fresh water can be met only through its rational use. According to the review, 95% of the population has access to clean and safe water, whilst 99.9% of the population uses water supply services organized in compliance with safety requirements. The share of safely treated wastewater in 2022 was 57.4%. Meteojournal, which familiarized itself with the review, noted that Turkmenistan - which possesses huge potential for using renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy - is currently not harnessing its potential. The review mentioned the construction of a 10-megawatt (MW) hybrid power plant using solar and wind energy in Kyzil-Arvat. The project was planned to be completed in January 2024, but has yet to open, and local media haven't reported any updates on the pace and status of the work.

Uzbekistan to Host Eco Race in Support of Aral Sea Region

On April 18 in Moynaq, Karakalpakstan, organizers Prorun will host an Aral Sea Eco Race with a total distance of two kilometers. Participants will run one km to the location of a tree planting, plant a tree, and then return. At the finish line, each participant will receive a medal in the form of a symbolic tree for partaking in the restoration project. As organizer Andrey Kulikov told the Times of Central Asia, "the run is being held to draw the world's attention to the environmental problems of the region and inspire everyone to take actions to protect it. Twelve participants have already registered, and about a hundred runners are expected. The run will be held at the experimental site next to the nature museum in Moynaq. The three fastest runners will receive commemorative prizes. In every race organized by the Prorun movement, we aim to attract as many people as possible to a healthy lifestyle and to dedicate the races to environmental protection and environmental issues. Our biggest event will be a 42-km marathon on the dried-up Aral Sea bed, which will take place on June 17. A hundred people will take part in the race dedicated to the International Day to Combat Desertification and Drought. In addition, Prorun practices 'plogging' races, during which participants collect rubbish along their route." The Aral Sea Eco Race is being held as part of the Aral Sea Tourism Week, which will run from April 16-19 in the Nukus and Moynaq districts of Karakalpakstan. During the week, there will be an international scientific and practical seminar "Goodwill Ambassadors of the Aral Sea," an exhibition and an art exhibition entitled "The Aral Sea Through the Eyes of Artists," where paintings of the Aral Sea will be presented. The participants will also enjoy a gastronomic festival called 99 kinds of fish dishes of the Aral Sea, and a trip to historical monuments. Last autumn, Uzbekistan planted 28,000 hectares of greenery in the Moynaq district and the desert areas of the Aral Sea basin as part of a nationwide greening campaign called Yashil Makon (Green Edge). In 2024, Kazakhstan plans to plant on 275,000 hectares of the former Aral Sea bed. In total, according to the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Kazakhstan, 544,500 hectares of forest were sown between 2021-2023.

Kazakhstan Faces Unprecedented Threats from Floods, Droughts, Locust Infestations

Experts are predicting a severe drought in Kazakhstan. Additionally, locusts are expected to invade the country, and the flood situation will be even worse next year. That's according to Kazakhstani ecologist, Dmitry Kalmykov, who further explained to the Times of Central Asia in an interview that climate change in the region is already irreversible. "There is an increase in the frequency and intensity of all extreme weather events, including drought, floods, catastrophic precipitation, storms, downpours. Simply put, there are, unfortunately, going to be more of these phenomena. In addition, the weather patterns relative to the seasons are changing. Precipitation falls at a different time of the season than we have come to expect. For example, last year in August rains destroyed up to 30% of the harvest in some regions of Kazakhstan. Already now, there are disappointing forecasts going forward. But it's good to have time to prepare," Kalmykov told TCA. Today's floods are an indicator of a lack of clear forecasting, Kalmykov said, stating that the government had information about the amount of snowfall, ground freezing, and moisture reserves. Yet no conclusions were drawn on the severity of the risks of high groundwater levels. "All over the world, even in Kazakhstan's environmental laws, this is called the need to adapt the economy to climate change that has already occurred. This is declared by Kazakhstan at the international level, but it is not fulfilled. Literally everything needs to be changed, including agricultural practices, water management, construction and emergency preparedness. This is an evolutionary law - if a species does not adapt to changed conditions, it does not survive. It is time for us to act," he warned. Dmitry  Kalmykov   Kazakhstan and China are expected to create a research center to combat drought. The two countries' academies of sciences will jointly study problems of ecology and land resources. However, Kalmykov is skeptical about this initiative, as he doesn't believe in the authorities' ability to apply practical science in real life. Earlier, climate change expert Kirill Pavlov released a drought forecast for Kazakhstan, which he attributes to the El Niño effect. Yesterday, TCA published an interview with Dr. Petr Svoik, a Kazakhstani economist and former head of the Anti-monopoly Policy Committee, in which he emphasized the need for a supranational structure to combat climate change, so that each state cannot arbitrarily come to “its own truth… There is only one interstate structure - the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council - where ministers of the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) countries can, among other things, make decisions regarding water resources, but these decisions are made by consensus. There is no center that adopts arbitration and final order. That is, this body cannot resolve a water dispute between, say, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, and there is no economic effect," he stated. In an earlier interview with TCA, despite admitting that this could be “potentially the most severe disaster in over 80 years,” Deputy Foreign Minister of Kazakhstan, Roman Vassilenko, stated that Kazakhstan is “effectively handling the...

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