• KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01151 0.87%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00217 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09413 -0.42%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 73 - 78 of 137

EU Project Grants to Empower Civil Society in Uzbekistan

The European Union Delegation to Uzbekistan has announced a new wave of project grants. Aimed at empowering civil society in Uzbekistan, particularly women and marginalized groups, funds of over EUR 3.5 million will be allocated to the development of eight initiatives. In her report on April 3rd, Charlotte Adriaen, EU Ambassador to Uzbekistan, stated: “Today's EU-funded project launch is just a glimpse into our ongoing commitment to bolster civil society organizations in Uzbekistan. Our yearly efforts are dedicated to empowering these vital entities, fostering inclusivity, vibrancy, and democracy. Prioritizing projects for women, children, and marginalized groups, we amplify voices, promote inclusive development, and drive or support Uzbekistan’s reform agenda. Together with civil society and state partners, we contribute to the pluralism and inclusivity crucial for a thriving democracy and a peaceful society.” Scheduled to operate from 2024 to 2026, the projects will focus on enhancing work undertaken by organizations concerning inclusion, gender equality and gender-responsiveness, and advances in the Green Agenda.

Towards a New Tashkent

On April 3rd, Uzbekistan President Shavkat Mirziyoyev attended a ceremony to celebrate the start of construction of New Tashkent; a twin capital located on 20,000 hectares east of the existing city of Tashkent, between the Chirchiq and Karasu rivers. Speaking at the launch, President Mirziyoyev emphasized the historical significance of the ground-breaking project and its far-reaching impact on the future of Uzbekistan: “Today we are laying the foundation for the campuses of Yangi Uzbekistan University and Tashkent State Pedagogical University, the National Library, the National Theater, the International Research Center, the Museum of Literature, and the Alisher Navoi School of Creativity. It is no coincidence that the construction of a new city begins with the abodes of knowledge and spirituality. They will become the basis and model in the formation of an enlightened society.” The new city’s campus of Tashkent State Pedagogical University will provide teaching facilities for 20 thousand students, dormitories for 5 thousand, a kindergarten for 300 children, and a school for 616 pupils. It will also include a sports centre, a palace of culture, and an amphitheatre. Yangi Uzbekistan University, rated as one of the most prestigious universities in the country for engineering, management, information technology, agricultural technology, humanities, and natural sciences, will be complemented by a second campus in New Tashkent. Once in operation, the new facilities will accommodate 10 thousand students, a library, sports complex, and an Olympic-sized swimming pool. Ambitious plans for the second city also include a new National Library of Uzbekistan with the capacity to house over 10 million books and accommodate over 1,400 users at any given time. Concluding his speech, the president underlined his belief that New Tashkent was set to become a centre for excellence in science, education, and culture not only for Uzbekistan but also for the entire region. It was earlier reported that master plans for New Tashkent had been developed by the UK’s Cross Works design company.

Marginalized But Indispensable – What the Crocus City Hall Attack Means for Central Asian Migrants

As previously reported by TCA, in the wake of the terrorist attack on the Crocus City Hall on the outskirts of Moscow which left 144 dead and 551 injured, Central Asian migrants in Russia have been living in a climate of fear. “There is panic, many people want to leave [Russia],” Shakhnoza Nodiri from the Ministry of Labor of Tajikistan said of the outflow of labor migrants. “We are now monitoring the situation; we have more people coming [to Tajikistan] than leaving.” One of the most remittance-based economies in the world, in 2023 official figures released by the Ministry of Labor, Migration and Employment of Tajikistan - often underestimated - stated that 652,014 people left the country to work abroad, largely to Russia. According to the World Bank, in 2022 remittances made by migrants accounted for 51% of the country’s GDP. As anticipated, despite the U.S specifically warning the Russian authorities that the Crocus City Hall was a potential target, whilst seeking to lay the blame for the attack on Ukraine, the Russian Government is intensifying its control over migrants. On April 1, a Ministry of Internal Affairs' spokesperson announced that the regulations will include mandatory fingerprinting and photographing of all foreigners upon entry into Russia, a reduction in the legal duration of stay from 180 days to 90 days, and the registration of migrants and their employers. In addition, whereas in the past a migrant could only be deported following a court's decision, this will no longer be the case. Against this backdrop, on April 3, the Davis Center at Harvard University hosted a seminar entitled, “The Crocus City Hall Terror Attack and Its Repercussions for Central Asians and Central Asia.” Opening the discussion, Yan Matusevich, a Ph.D. Candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, highlighted the fact that the “migration system has been in place for a very long time [and] the Central Asian migrant community in Russia has lived through crisis after crisis. But there are not a lot of alternatives out there,” he started, “so it's really hard to disentangle oneself from that. It’s been difficult for migrants for a long time, but they also know how to navigate the system, as violent and oppressive as it is. “Migrants are also under a lot of pressure to join the war effort, because a lot of Russians have left fleeing mobilization. Migrants are very resilient, though, and paradoxically, because there is such a major labor deficit in Russia, there are a lot of employment opportunities. Bringing in brigades of migrants in uniforms who are completely segregated and work in slave-like conditions would be the Russian ideal, but the problem is the reality doesn't match up given the dependence on migratory labor.” Malika Bahovadinova, a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Amsterdam, addressed the “ambiguity” migrants face over whether their “status is legal or illegal.” Criminalization of migration laws has been a trend since 2013, she argued, with increased tracking...

Uzbekistan to Support Migrant Workers

At a government meeting on April 2nd, following his previous order to facilitate access to the external labour market, Uzbekistan President Shavkat Mirziyoyev was presented with proposals to streamline labour migration and support Uzbek migrant workers abroad. Over the past two years, the Uzbek Agency for External Labour Migration has assisted 70 thousand people in securing work in developed countries. Many unskilled laborers, however, still opt to work abroad independently and as a result, struggle. To resolve problems encountered by Uzbek citizens working abroad, Uzbekistan is to introduce round-the-clock call centres and labour migration attachés in its embassies and consulates in the UK, Germany, Poland, Hungary, and Japan. A mahalla is a traditional Uzbek community centred in a residential neighbourhood. Under the new initiative, based on the principle “work abroad begins with the mahalla,” local authorities and youth leaders will identify anyone wishing to work abroad and enter their data in a designated “Online Mahalla” platform. Candidates will then be invited to compete for employment abroad. Training will be provided by vocational education institutions for citizens lacking professional skills. In addition, a centre for teaching foreign languages will be opened at the Agency for External Labour Migration to help prepare candidates. The state has announced that it will also reimburse part of the costs of work visas and tickets, as well as the assessment of labour migrants’ knowledge of foreign languages and professional qualifications. Earlier on, the head of state instigated measures to ensure employment for people returning from labour migration.

Kazakhstan-Korea Drone Roadshow in Astana

On April 2nd, Astana hosted the “2024 Kazakhstan-Korea Drone Roadshow” which included a seminar on the development of UAVs and the creation of the Kazakhstan-Korea Drone Competence Development Academy. As reported by the Kazakh Ministry of Industry and Construction, advanced solutions were presented for the use of drones in various fields, training of drone operators, and the control and supervision of the use of UAVs. The seminar also covered the development and improvement of regulatory documents and discussions on Kazakh-Korean cooperation in UAV development. According to the ministry, the event will help Kazakhstan join the leading number of countries involved in the development and use of unmanned aerial systems.

Kazakh Tennis: Foreign-Born Talent and Grassroots Programs

ALMATY, Kazakhstan - Elena Rybakina, a Moscow-born citizen of Kazakhstan, considers her run to the final of the Miami Open this past weekend to be a success. Kazakhstan’s tennis federation duly noted the achievement, but what it really wants to see is more homegrown talent making a splash in global tennis. “It was a great two weeks. A lot of tough matches, great battles,” said 24-year-old Rybakina, who won five matches on her way to the final, where she lost to American Danielle Collins. Rybakina, the world No. 4, won Wimbledon in 2022 and was runner-up at the Australian Open last year. Rybakina played at Spartak Club in Moscow as a junior but secured citizenship in Kazakhstan in 2017 after the tennis federation there offered generous support for her career. Her Wimbledon victory came in a year when players from Russia and Belarus were barred from participating because of international tension over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Rybakina’s Wimbledon triumph was met with a “mixed reaction” by some observers who wondered about the state of grassroots tennis in Kazakhstan, said Yuriy Polskiy, vice president of the Kazakhstan Tennis Federation and president of the Asian Tennis Federation. Polskiy wrote in an article published in Euronewsweek in February that 10 Kazakhstanis finished the 2023 season in the top 100. While some players competing for Kazakhstan were born outside the country, all the players in the junior rankings were born and trained in Kazakhstan, he said. Top talents include Amir Omarkhanov, who this year was the first Kazakh player to reach the Australian Open Junior Championship quarterfinals. On the women’s side, Asylzhan Arystanbekova reached the quarterfinals at the junior doubles tournament in Melbourne this year. Bulat Utemuratov, president of the Kazakhstan Tennis Federation, has led development of national tennis, spending big sums since he became head of the federation in 2007. Today, players who are 14-16 years old have been training for about a decade and there are 48 modern tennis facilities with 360 courts, most of them indoors, according to tennis officials. The cost of court rentals has plunged and the number of children playing tennis has soared in Kazakhstan. “They are the ones who will represent Kazakhstan at professional tournaments in the future, and the country won’t have to bring players from elsewhere,” Polskiy wrote. For now, Rybakina and Alexander Bublik, another Russia-born player who changed citizenship and is ranked No. 18 in the world, are the biggest names in Kazakh tennis.

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