• KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00225 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09234 0.22%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 13 - 18 of 7171

Uzbek Politician Decries Dominance of Russian Language in Country

Alisher Kadyrov, leader of the Milliy Tiklanish Party and Vice-Speaker of the Legislative Chamber of the Oliy Majlis of Uzbekistan, has proposed a ban on the provision of public services to persons who don't speak the Uzbek language. He expressed this opinion in response to a statement by the chairman of the Russian State Duma, Vyacheslav Volodin. Kadyrov said that the Uzbek language should be defined in legislation as a mandatory language. "In our laws, in addition to creating conditions for citizens of other nationalities to study their native language and values in kindergarten and at school, the Uzbek language should be defined as compulsory," he wrote in his Telegram channel. The politician stated that he believes it should be impossible for a person who doesn't know Uzbek to be employed in the civil service or use state services. Earlier, Kadyrov suggested limiting the use of Russian on Uzbek television and in education. The party leader stated that a norm on teaching primary education in Uzbek should be introduced into legislation. "We have not been able to teach Russian compatriots the Uzbek language for 100 years. On the contrary, it has become customary that Uzbeks send their children to be educated in Russian. In Tashkent, the number of schools where education is not in Uzbek has grown. Unfortunately, more than 90% of pupils at such schools are Uzbeks," the Vice-Speaker wrote. Kadyrov's statements run counter to Article 19 of the Uzbek Constitution, which states that "all citizens have the same rights and freedoms and are equal before the law regardless of sex, race, nationality, language, religion, beliefs, social origin, or social status."

First Kazakh Woman Reaches the Summit of Everest

Anar Burasheva, the first woman from Kazakhstan to climb Mount Everest, did a little dance on her descent. “My heart is on this mountain,” Burasheva said on Instagram after reaching the peak. She and two other Kazakh climbers, along with a support team of four Sherpas, made it to the top on Sunday after a five-day trip from base camp in Nepal. The other Kazakh mountaineers are Maksut Zhumayev, a mountain training instructor in the Kazakh military who was making his third Everest ascent, and Almir Kymbatbaiuly. “Congratulations to Anar Burasheva, the first Kazakh woman to conquer the highest mountain peak in the world. Scaling 8,848 meters above sea level, Mount Everest - an incredible achievement,” Erzhan Kazykhan, a Kazakh presidential adviser on foreign affairs, said on X. Kazakhstan’s defense ministry also congratulated the Kazakh climbers, whose ascent was organized by Seven Summit Treks, a Nepali expedition company that specializes in Himalayan climbs. Burasheva has climbed peaks in Kazakhstan and abroad, and is also a long-distance runner. Lucia Janičová also summited Everest on Sunday, becoming the first Slovakian woman to do so. Seven Summit Treks assisted her, as well. The company’s senior guide for the ascent was Kami Rita Sherpa, who logged his 29th trip to the summit.

UNDP and British Embassy to Help Increase the Capacity of Turkmenistan’s Boards of Lawyers

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the British Embassy in Turkmenistan have signed a Contribution Agreement in support of “Increasing the Capacity of the Boards of Lawyers in Turkmenistan.” The initiative to be implemented jointly by the UNDP and Boards of Lawyers in Turkmenistan, aims to enhance the latter’s capacity to provide legal aid in accordance with international standards including:  UN Principles and Guidelines on Access to Legal Aid in Criminal Justice Systems, Basic Principles Concerning the Role of Lawyers, and Standards of Independence of the Legal Community adopted by the International Bar Association. The project will also assist the Boards of Lawyers in the establishment of a National Chamber of Lawyers in Turkmenistan. The new body will represent and safeguard the interests of lawyers, coordinate the Boards of Lawyers’ activities in Ashgabat and across the country’s regions, ensure high-quality legal assistance, and address issues which impact the legal community's interests. UNDP will also assist in digitizing the Boards of Lawyers' operations in Turkmenistan.    

Kazakhstan’s President Commends Growing Cooperation Between Central Asian States

On May 16, Kazakhstan's President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev hosted the first meeting in Astana of Security Council secretaries from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, and the military attaché of the Embassy of Turkmenistan in Kazakhstan. In his opening address, Tokayev announced that the aim of the meeting was to provide an effective platform for the collaborative prevention of external and internal challenges and threats, and to develop necessary response measures. The Kazakh leader began by noting the steady growth of trade and economic cooperation between the Central Asian countries and stated that over the past five years, intraregional trade  had risen by 80 percent to exceed $10 billion.  He explained that large regional projects not only bring tangible mutual benefits, but also change the entire configuration of the Central Asian economy. The development of transport and logistics potential is becoming a new reference point for the rapid development of the region. Cultural and humanitarian ties have also intensified, contributing to the further rapprochement of the Central Asian states. Returning to the pressing issue of the need to join forces in countering transboundary challenges and threats, he announced: “First of all, we are talking about the fight against international extremism and terrorism, drug trafficking, and arms trafficking. In this regard, Afghanistan must be the focus of our common attention. Complex multidirectional processes are now evident in this country. Whilst signs point to a stabilization and revival of the economic situation, there remain high risks associated with the activity of international terrorist organizations, as evidenced by the bloody terrorist attack in the Moscow region [in March]. In our opinion, one of the strategic tasks at present is the active involvement of Afghanistan in regional ties. And for this, much depends on the coordinated position of our countries. We consider it urgent to create a UN Regional Center for Sustainable Development Goals for Central Asia and Afghanistan in our country.” Tokayev expressed his satisfaction with the growing regional cooperation and mutual trust and concluded:  “Some 10 years ago, there was no such situation in the Central Asian region. Now heads of state, heads of government, secretaries of the Security Councils, heads of law enforcement agencies, not to mention heads of economic departments, closely interact with each other. And this is a very good sign that the situation in the Central Asian region is moving towards sustainable development.”    

Kyrgyz Sugar Farmers Being Ruined By Imports

Favorable weather conditions will allow Kyrgyz farmers to harvest a large beet crop this year. However, this will not stop the flow of imported sugar, as local production capacity covers only 65% of domestic needs. Cheap sugar imported from Russia and Kazakhstan could bankrupt farms. The sugar beet harvest in Kyrgyzstan usually begins in October-November, when processing begins. According to the ministry of agriculture, local farmers do not fully supply sugar beets to processing plants. Therefore, sugar has to be imported from Russia and Kazakhstan, jeopardizing the country's food security. Farmers themselves argue that cheap imports make beet cultivation unprofitable. Today there are about 3,000 beet farms in Kyrgyzstan, but their number is rapidly decreasing as it is becoming increasingly difficult to survive in the market. Nevertheless, the government is trying to rectify the situation by giving farmers 7 billion som ($78.6m) in soft loans. "If we talk about crops, they are not bad now. Only the lazy will be able to spoil the harvest. The weather conditions are excellent this year: there is moisture, not much heat, but enough, and beet is doing well. I think the harvest will be above average this year," Chui region farmer Mirgasym Allakhveranov told The Times of Central Asia. Kyrgyzstan should stop importing sugar from abroad and rely only on its own production, he said. The situation, he thinks, is exacerbated by the actions of resellers who export beets out of the country. "For the farmer it is very good, when they export beets (abroad), it means that the price will increase. But for the population it is not very good, because then the price of sugar rises. There is less sugar in the country and deficit begins. Naturally, traders, who have a special nose for these things, immediately raise prices," Allakhveranov added. According to official data, since the beginning of 2024, Kyrgyz authorities have already imported 10,800 tons of sugar worth $6.4m. The figures show that Kyrgyz stocks of the product are dwindling. Earlier, the ministry of agriculture submitted for public discussion a draft law proposing a ban on sugar exports until early fall. "The population's demand for the year is 145.7 thousand tons, in order to avoid a market price frenzy, as well as taking into account the temporary bans on the export of cane or beet sugar from Russia and Kazakhstan, it is necessary to establish a temporary ban on exports until the new harvest," reads the draft government resolution. To fully supply Kyrgyzstan with granulated sugar, about 20,000 hectares of beets must be planted each year, processing plant owners say. This year, 15,000 hectares were planted despite government subsidies. Farmer Mirgasym Allakhveranov said that in the 1960s, Kyrgyz beet was considered the best in Central Asia. Scientists worked to create a root crop that yielded a good harvest. But the methods they developed no longer exist – farmers buy seeds in Europe that are not always suitable for the local climate. This affects beet yields and leads to a...

Kyrgyzstan and Malaysia to Revive Bilateral Cooperation

On 15 May, Prime Minister of Malaysia Anwar Ibrahim paid an official visit to Bishkek to engage in talks with President Sadyr Japarov. The agenda focused on the current state of the countries’ bilateral cooperation and the potential for further development in sectors including agriculture, tourism, energy, renewable energy sources, mining, infrastructure, information technology, and the halal industry. The meeting concluded with the signing of a ‘Joint Statement on the comprehensive enhancement of cooperation between the Kyrgyz Republic and Malaysia’, described by President Japarov as a road map for the further development of Kyrgyz-Malaysian relations. At a meeting later in the day with the Prime Minister of Malaysia, Chairman of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic Akylbek Japarov emphasized the importance of joint efforts in the implementation of a more comprehensive business partnership between Kyrgyzstan and Malaysia. In this regard, Akylbek Japarov proposed the immediate revival of the Special Kyrgyz-Malaysian Joint Commission, which created in 1997, had proved an effective means of enhancing cooperation between the two countries. In addition, he invited Malaysian investors to collaborate in projects concerning renewable energy sources, mining, the halal industry, and education, as well as exchanging experience in the field of Islamic finance. The two countries also opened negotiations for the introduction of direct flights between Bishkek and Kuala Lumpur. In response to the meeting, the Prime Minister of Malaysia emphasized his readiness to develop and strengthen the high potential of bilateral cooperation across the board. Towards this goal, he spoke of Malaysia’s interest in establishing cooperation in the banking sector and opening a bank in Kyrgyzstan, and with reference to education, said that his government was considering reducing the fees for Kyrgyz students from low-income families wishing to study in his country.    

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