• KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%
  • KGS/USD = 0.01134 0%
  • KZT/USD = 0.00226 0%
  • TJS/USD = 0.09264 0.54%
  • UZS/USD = 0.00008 0%

Viewing results 1 - 6 of 54

U.S. Authorities Asked to Sanction Violators of Religious Freedoms in Tajikistan

In early May, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) published its annual report on violations of religious freedom around the world. As a result of the report, the Commission called on the U.S. government to impose targeted sanctions against government agencies and officials in Tajikistan responsible for serious violations of religious freedom. This is reported by Radio Ozodi. The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) is an independent, bipartisan federal government organization created by the U.S. Congress to monitor, analyze, and report on religious freedom abroad. USCIRF makes foreign policy recommendations to the President, Secretary of State, and Congress to deter religious persecution and promote freedom of religion and belief. Its annual report describes and evaluates U.S. international religious freedom policy. USCIRF criticizes the Tajik authorities for punishing oppositionists and critics of Emomali Rahmon's government under the pretext of combating extremism, closing mosques due to failure to fulfill the plan to draft into the Armed Forces of Tajikistan, restricting the activities of certain Aga Khan-related facilities in the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Oblast, banning the activities of Jehovah's Witnesses, etc. The Commission emphasizes that the situation of religious freedom in Tajikistan, despite earlier recommendations, did not improve in 2023. "In 2023, the government of Tajikistan continued to restrict the religious activities of citizens, including those living abroad," the report states. For this reason, the Commission recommended that the U.S. government impose targeted sanctions against government agencies and officials responsible for serious violations of religious freedom, freeze their assets, and bar them from entering the United States. A similar recommendation was announced last May. USCIRF also called on the U.S. State Department to place Tajikistan, along with 16 other countries, on a "red" list of countries "of particular concern" because their governments commit or tolerate particularly serious violations of the right to freedom of religion or belief. In addition to Tajikistan, the list includes Burma, China, Cuba, Nicaragua, North Korea, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkmenistan, Vietnam and others. The Tajik authorities have not yet responded to the report, but the Tajik Committee on Religious Affairs responded to Radio Ozodi's request in January this year that it "considers the situation with religious freedom in the country to be good" and "not all the data in the reports correspond to reality". Tajikistan's challenges with violent extremism were highlighted recently following the claim by an offshoot of the Islamic State terrorist group, known as Islamic State-Khorasan, for the April attack on the Crocus City concert hall outside Moscow, which resulted in at least 143 fatalities. Russian investigators have determined that the assault was carried out by four individuals, all of whom were identified as Tajik nationals.

Prosecutor General’s Office of Tajikistan and U.S. State Department Sign Memorandum of Cooperation

Tajikistan and the U.S. have agreed to continue bilateral legal cooperation in various areas, as reported by the General Prosecutor's Office of the Republic of Tajikistan. During the meeting, Prosecutor General of Tajikistan, Rahmon Yusuf Ahmadzoda and the U.S. Ambassador to the Tajikistan, Manuel Mikaller discussed issues related to the exchange of information on challenges and threats to the security of both states, the protection of the rights and interests of citizens, preventing and combating manifestations of violent extremism and terrorism, cyber-crime, transnational organized crime, and other issues. A Memorandum of Intent on cooperation on the implementation of the Personal Identity Comparison and Evaluation System to Regulate the Movement of Terrorists (PISCES) was signed. "This system allows the movement of terrorists to be tracked through extensive technological surveillance, as well as assisting in their capture and apprehension," the report stated.

Dushanbe Conference to Discuss New Mass Media Law

On May 14, Dushanbe will host a conference entitled "Favorable Media Environment - an Important Factor of Legal Education in Society." The meeting is being organized by the Tajik Parliament and the nonprofit organization, Homa, with the support of the European Union (EU). The purpose of the discussion is to review the draft law "On Mass Media" with participation from a wide range of representatives of government agencies, international, multilateral, nonprofit, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the media. According to representatives of civic organizations, the rapid development of technology and international norms oblige the government to adapt legislation to international standards and modern best practices. In March 2023, a working group was established to draft a law on the mass media. It included representatives of government agencies and civil society, who together studied the experience of various countries in the region and analyzed legislative acts regulating media activities. In Tajikistan, the activities of the media are regulated mainly by two laws: the law "On Periodical Press and Other Mass Media" and the law "On Television and Radio Broadcasting." Following crackdowns, only two significant independent media voices remain in Tajikistan; the privately owned Asia-Plus, and the U.S. Congress-funded Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty’s local service, both of which have long been subjected to partial shutdowns.

Tajikistan Warns Its Citizens to Be Ready for Additional Checks at Kazakhstan’s Airports

Tajikistan's Foreign Ministry has reminded its citizens in a statement on its website to have all necessary documents with them before leaving for Kazakhstan due to increased security measures at all airports in the neighboring country. "In case of checks when passing border and customs control upon arrival in Kazakhstan, citizens of Tajikistan should be ready to answer questions related to the purpose and timing of their trip, place of residence, the presence of acquaintances or relatives in Kazakhstan, providing, if necessary, their residential address and contact numbers," the Foreign Ministry said. The Ministry noted that in case of difficulties it is necessary to apply to the Embassy of Tajikistan in Kazakhstan or the Consulate General in Almaty. Fom May 1, aviation security measures have been strengthened in all of Kazakhstan's airports. Additional measures have been introduced at security check areas, parking lots and passenger terminals. As reported by the press service of Kazakhstan's Civil Aviation Committee (CAC) at the Ministry of Industry, the first line of inspection at the entrance to passenger terminals has been introduced to help preclude the movement of prohibited items and substances. "Strengthening of measures on aviation security is associated with the implementation of preventive measures and assessment of the state of aviation security of civil aviation air transport infrastructure," stated the CAC.

Central Asian Entrepreneurs in Russia Shutting Down Hospitality Businesses Due to Xenophobia, Police Inspections

As previously reported by TCA, cafes and restaurants in Russia run by business owners from Central Asia have begun to close en masse. Following the terrorist attack on Crocus City Hall near Moscow on March 22, for which several Tajik nationals have been detained and charged as the perpetrators, preexisting anti-migrant sentiment in Russia has intensified. Since that time, 75% of cafes and restaurants run by Central Asian migrants in Moscow alone have shut, with their owners citing xenophobia and harassment by the police. According to the Current Time news portal, police have sharply stepped up checks on newcomers, mostly Central Asians, over the past month. Raids against migrants are going on all over the country. Many migrants have already left Russia because of this - or refused to visit public places, including cafes. Café and restaurant owners have therefore suffered losses, and many have been forced to cease operations altogether. Police inspections of cafes and restaurants frequented by migrants have also increased - which is also not good for business. Migrants from other countries who work in the hospitality industry in Russia have also stated that increased xenophobia and raids after the terrorist attack have hit the restaurant business particularly hard. Those pressures - coupled with painfully high Russian inflation for food, goods, labor, and more  - have made operations in the hospitality sector unprofitable for many whose livelihoods depend on it.

Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan May Swap Territories to Ease Border Tensions

In order to solve their long-running border demarcation dispute, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan may consider the option of exchanging territories. That's according to remarks made by Marat Imankulov, the Secretary of the Security Council of the Kyrgyz Republic, in an interview with state news agency, Kabar. According to him, the remarkable thing is that the border in the Batken region passes through difficult terrain, densely populated areas, bisecting streets, yards, and even houses. “Therefore, it should be separated. This is a difficult compromise. It is impossible without it. We have to give way. If necessary, the option of exchanging regions can be considered. Of course, there should be a preliminary agreement with local residents; that's how things are going now,” said Imankulov. The Secretary of the Security Council noted that each country has its own interests, but the parties are now looking for balance and compromise. Imankulov added that all border negotiations should proceed peacefully. Demarcation of the border has been a long-standing source of conflict between the two nations, it is emblematic of the problem that even the length of the border - sometimes cited as being 975-kilomtres long, and at others times 972-kilomteres - is rarely agreed upon. In January 2023, Tajikistan’s President Rahmon stated that 614-kilometres had been settled upon, backtracking on a previously stated figure of 664. In a sign of thawing relations, however, on November 9th 2023, the Cabinet of Ministers of the Kyrgyz Republic announced that a further 17.98 kilometers of the border had been agreed. With its scant natural resources and dwindling water supplies, the border between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan has been the scene of numerous skirmishes for many years. In 2014, all borders between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan were closed indefinitely to Kyrgyz and Tajik citizens following clashes over a bypass road in disputed territory; mortars were fired and both armies suffered casualties. Trouble spilled over again throughout 2021 and 2022, reportedly starting over a water dispute in the Vorukh enclave, and leaving an unknown number in the hundreds killed, and up to 136,000 people evacuated. In September 2022, another shooting took place on the border between the two countries.

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