Kyrgyzstan: another former prime minister detained on corruption charges

Kyrgyzstan's former Prime Minister Jantoro Satybaldiev (file photo)

BISHKEK (TCA) — Kyrgyzstan’s State Committee for National Security on June 18 detained the country’s former Prime Minister Jantoro Satybaldiev on corruption charges.

The Committee’s press center said Satybaldiev was detained in a graft case related to modernization work at the Bishkek Heat and Power Plant.

The ex-Prime Minister was put in the pretrial detention center of the State Committee for National Security.

Satybaldiev is the second former prime minister taken into custody in the graft case related to the modernization of the Bishkek Heat and Power Plant.

On June 5, former Prime Minister Sapar Isakov was put in pretrial detention for two months, a week after he was charged with corruption.

Isakov’s cabinet was dismissed in April following a no-confidence vote by the Parliament.

The charge against Isakov stems from 2013, when he was implementing a project to modernize the Bishkek Heat and Power Plant while serving as deputy head of the administration of then President Almazbek Atambayev.

He is accused of using his position to lobby for the interests of a Chinese company in the selection process of a contractor for the modernization of the power plant, inflicting great damage on the Kyrgyz state and society.

The Chinese company TBEA was selected as the winner of the tender. The case was launched after an accident at the Bishkek power station in January left thousands of households in the capital without heat for several days last winter.

Isakov denies any wrongdoing.

Sergey Kwan

TCA

Sergey Kwan has worked for The Times of Central Asia as a journalist, translator and editor since its foundation in March 1999. Prior to this, from 1996-1997, he worked as a translator at The Kyrgyzstan Chronicle, and from 1997-1999, as a translator at The Central Asian Post.
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Kwan studied at the Bishkek Polytechnic Institute from 1990-1994, before completing his training in print journalism in Denmark.

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